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View Full Version : Spinoff: Progression/Evolution of Jumping Form



chukkerchild
Sep. 3, 2009, 05:09 PM
You know how way back when, before the forward seat was developed, people used to jump leaning back in the ol' yo-ho hunt seat style? Sometimes with one hand in the air? And then the forward seat was developed and refined by people as they learned more about influencing and/or staying out of the way of a horse's jump. And even since then (which was really not so long ago, maybe seventy years?) bits and pieces of "perfect" form have been experimented with and changed (ie, how far your foot is in the stirrup, outside-bar-ahead-of-inside bar, etc.) I'm wondering how other things will change as jumping science and physiology continues to evolve.

What things would you venture to say you could see happening?? Here's mine: I think that over larger fences that when you're in balance the leg should swing back parallel to the ground. When I've watched riders that do this, it seems that the propulsion of their leg swinging back to the girth as the horse lands from the fence pushes them up and absorbs concussion so that their seat does not touch the saddle, allowing freedom in the horse's back to turn easily or sit themselves back in a tight grid. Sounds good to me. ;)

All theoretical, of course, but I've always thought it looked comfortable and natural for some reason.

dainty do
Sep. 3, 2009, 05:25 PM
I think that over larger fences that when you're in balance the leg should swing back parallel to the ground. When I've watched riders that do this, it seems that the propulsion of their leg swinging back to the girth as the horse lands from the fence pushes them up and absorbs concussion so that their seat does not touch the saddle, allowing freedom in the horse's back

This sounds like how Rodney Jenkins used to ride. He was possibly the most successful grand prix rider of all time, so one might think that this style would be copied more. I have heard that he rode mostly by natural "feel" and was mostly self-taught. I'm no Rodney, so when my legs swing back it pitches my balance forward. I need my leg underneath me to help me stay centered.