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Sparkling_Sunset
Sep. 2, 2009, 08:09 PM
So, I 've got two prospects going here, that I'm thinking of buying. (But only one!) One is a 14-year, 14 hand Un-registered Welsh, who's being sold because his owner, a 14-year-old girl, wants to move up to the 4 foot + jumpers (heaven help her!). I love the way his temperment looks (with her, anyway!:), he's older, so I would think that would make him quieter... here's the video link : www.youtube.com/watch?v=SvvsXgqGl1I. They're asking
$10k for him, negotiable.

The other is 7 years, 13.2 hands, Registered Section B Welsh, by Glannant Keel. He's been trained primarily hunters, though he was trained some in dressage by Kaycee Welsh Ponies when he was about 4 or 5. He's $8,500, firm I think. I've ridden him twice before I had a horrible accident on another horse. I don't really know what to make of him. I'm very timid and I need a horse that will build my confidence, and well... the lady that's training him told my mom months ago that "he was WILD when I first got him; I almost sent him back!" I'm not sure what she ment by that, but... well, the first time I rode him, I totally lost my balance cantering, was hanging onto his neck, quite certain I was going to be eating dirt any second, and... he just stopped. Not a slam-the-brakes-on stop, just soft, gentle stop where I managed to sit back up, give a him a (shaky) pat on the neck, and dismount properly. And the second time, I was with the trainer at the facility he's at, and he just seemed like a DREAM to ride-- silky gaits, easy to steer, easy to stop (even though he could get a little speedy at the trot, he never ignored my aids when I asked him to slow down), light but not TOO light off the leg... At the time, though, I was really, in my heart, wanting a large, elegant, 16.1 + HORSE (though my mom thought I should get a pony, which why I looked at him). Now that's REVERSED, weirdly enough. I might add, despite what the lady who is training him said to my mom, I have never seen him spook, bolt, buck (not even in turn-out-- I've free-lunged him a couple of times), or kick or bite. He CAN get a teensy bit bratty about treats, but I have to say that I've never witnessed him doing anything dangerous undersaddle or really on the ground for that matter. He's also, in my opinion, pretty intelligent-- he can bow, count, "smile", "wave", and cross (his front legs). And he's even saved his trainer from a rattlesnake! (I live in Southern California, and he's out in Santa Clarita; the other one is in Ventura County) Still, because of his age, and what I HEARD... that's what gives me pause, not anything I've actually experienced. I wish I had a video so I could show you his gaits; he actually has a nice, fairly uphill canter, and a different trot than the palo; but the seller never made one and neither have I. (Though I 'm going to try sometime soon)
Also, I would like to add, I KNOW small does not equal safe. I looked at a 14.2 13 year pony a long while back, and did not stick around after the first 5 minutes of riding her-- she had a horrible habit of rootingand nearly unseated me. And I know of another pony that is for sale at my local barn that I would not even TRY riding because she is incredibly spooky when she is standing inside of her own stall! And, I've looked at more than one horse that turned out to be such a sourpuss in person that I left without even getting on. Temperment IS a MAJOR factor for me-- I want an equine with a "puppydog personality". I don't know if anyone watched the entire video of the Palomino (who's name, by the way, is Popcorn), near the end the girl rides him BAREBACK AND BRIDLELESS, and then she gives him a hug at the very end of it. THAT'S the kind of personality I want! (But I don't think I could ever do bareback, with any horse, and DEF not bridleless!)

Which of these do you think would be a better bet? Mind, I haven't actually seen the Palomino in person, while the other one I've ridden, so it's kind of a tough call... And, by the way, I'm only interested in dressage (which is why I'm posting this in this section), and also in-hand showing, if you can do that with a gelding.

Edit: I am 5'2, 92-97 pounds (depending on whether I've been lazy and Cookie-Monsterish or not:) ) I've only been on a horse twice since my accident. She was a 16.2 Hanoverian X, and being up there on her TERRIFIED me. Besides, I like the idea of a pony. Also, to add more info on the Palomino: he's been schooled in leg-yields, shoulder-in, haunches-in/out, and has a flying change, so I think he probably about 2nd level dressage, and could likely do 3rd. I guess what I'd really like to know is, what could I offer for him? (The Palo) And please, NO being a rude jerk about it! You aren't the ones selling him.

Coppers mom
Sep. 2, 2009, 09:13 PM
I think you could get a lot more dressage pony for those prices.

slc2
Sep. 2, 2009, 09:28 PM
The palomino looks quick and energetic, not a good choice for a person lacking confidence. And...Why buy a hunter to do dressage? Especially if you lack confidence, buy a trained, experienced, quiet older dressage horse that has been trained in dressage, ridden in dressage shows, NOT a retraining project. It will be a lot cheaper than these (factoring in retraining costs). The back on the palomino is not correct, and he looks a little uneven.

Ambrey
Sep. 2, 2009, 10:08 PM
Uh, do you need a pony? Because if you get something 14.3 you'll get a LOT cheaper. That first pony looks a lot like my daughter's 1/2 welsh hony, and he'd be dirt cheap in this market even though he's been in steady dressage training and is going pretty well, and jumps too.

Even for ponies, if you get something with no jump you'll save a lot of money.

goodpony
Sep. 2, 2009, 10:37 PM
I'd be careful not to buy something too narrow for an adult to ride (even small adult). The deeper the pony the better your chance of fitting him/her well.

hoopoe
Sep. 2, 2009, 11:53 PM
AGE DOES NOT = QUIET small does not = safe

For the price ( 10,000) you could find a nice steady confirmed 2nd level horse. This one is not even showing viable training level work.

I suggest working with a trainer to find a nice steady properly trained horse. For $10,000 you can find something trained for purpose and with and temper you need. If you are a timid rider the last thing you need is to tackle training a horse to a new discipline.

I am not trying to harsh you , I am trying to give you the wisdom of been there done that mistake

shoot, if he was a little more sound I would give you mine

Ambrey
Sep. 3, 2009, 12:09 AM
Agree with hoopoe, my welshx is 12 and can be quite hot. He is slowly learning to use his cuteness for good rather than evil, but ponies can be... fun ;)

Of course, if you had 3x that amount, I'd say you need to buy the mobile horse supply lady's PSG mare :) That's the one I would want if I was petite!

http://www.mobilehorsesupply.com/images/Breeding%20Program/Mollie-2.jpg

mbm
Sep. 3, 2009, 01:16 AM
well, i think you can do better for the amount. a lot better.

poltroon
Sep. 3, 2009, 02:11 AM
The right pony is out there. I do like small, but of course small is not necessarily quiet. (Small is easier to sit if there is an incident.) Don't feel limited to these two. It sounds like you have doubts about them.

Welshes are of course lovely, but you might also find what you're looking for in a Morgan, a QH, a Connemara, a Haflinger, or somewhere else. In this price range, you should be able to find what you seek.

rabicon
Sep. 3, 2009, 09:06 AM
Don't like the first one. Not really even ready for training level. He seems off balance in the canter esp. and he looks like he might be a handful. The rider is very handsy, not sure if its because she is trying to keep his attention or just the way she rides. I wouldn't pay 10K for that pony. The second without seeing is hard to say but I wouldn't get a primarly hunter horse for dressage unless you want to take the time and have the confidence in retraining him. (but some hunter horses got easily into dressage) I'd pass on both and keep looking.

AKB
Sep. 3, 2009, 09:30 AM
The palomino is quite cute, but may never do above Training level dressage. If you are interested in him, you need to ride him at least 3 times to be sure he is as calm as you need. I would also talk with people who know him. If they say he bucks or is difficult at times, he is not for you. I like that the kid has done lots of things with him. I had a Irish Draught who was raised by an Irish family with 15 kids. Then, my kids evented, pony clubbed and did polocrosse with him. By the time he became my horse, he was totally bombproof.

Don't be in a hurry to buy. Your best bet may be an arrangement where you can lease to purchase. We have done that with several of our horses. After a month of riding them, you will know if it is the right one. If it isn't the right one, at least the seller has $500 or whatever amount of your money. Of course, every horse that we did the lease purchase on was perfect. We fell in love and finished the purchase. Be sure the horse is fully insured, at your expense, during the month.

gardenie
Sep. 3, 2009, 09:32 AM
Edit: I am 5'2, 92-97 pounds (depending on whether I've been lazy and Cookie-Monsterish or not ) I've only been on a horse twice since my accident. She was a 16.2 Hanoverian X, and being up there on her TERRIFIED me. Besides, I like the idea of a pony. Also, to add more info on the Palomino: he's been schooled in leg-yields, shoulder-in, haunches-in/out, and has a flying change, so I think he probably about 2nd level dressage, and could likely do 3rd. I guess what I'd really like to know is, what could I offer for him? (The Palo) And please, NO being a rude jerk about it! You aren't the ones selling him.

Ponies...they don't call them pony-brained for nothing.

Just because they are ponies, doesn't mean they are easier or safer. The palomino looks like alot of horse.

That said, I love ponies. I have a 14.3 Andy that my sick Mom (balance problems, arthritis, liver bad, shouldn't ride, but won't do anything else) rides every day that will go out and move xc. He has a great temperment because he reads the rider. That's the kind of horse you need.

You need a quiet steady mount. Don't get hung up on what you think you like. And with your history, you should make sure you get one on trial or ride it at the venue over several days to make sure that horse/pony can take your fear and maintain training and quietness over time.

ania
Sep. 3, 2009, 09:37 AM
I have a 14.3 Andy that my sick Mom (balance problems, arthritis, liver bad, shouldn't ride, but won't do anything else) rides every day that will go out and move xc. He has a great temperment because he reads the rider. That's the kind of horse you need.


the andalusian (or maybe lusitano) idea isn't a bad one. i don't think the palomino is worth the 10k- it seems you should be able to get something nicer for that much.

poltroon
Sep. 3, 2009, 09:47 AM
The Palomino is easily worth $10k as a hunter/jumper pony, but as a dressage pony, even though he may have "schooled" haunches-in etc, he does not currently have enough suspension in his gait to go above training level. That's not to say he couldn't develop it, but at 14 he's a few years of schooling away at best from that 2nd or 3rd level test, if that is what you're looking to do.

Tamara in TN
Sep. 3, 2009, 09:49 AM
[QUOTE=Sparkling_Sunset;4349001]So, I 've got two prospects going here, that I'm thinking of buying. (But only one!) One is a 14-year, 14 hand Un-registered Welsh, who's being sold because his owner, a 14-year-old girl, wants to move up to the 4 foot + jumpers (heaven help her!). I love the way his temperment looks (with her, anyway!:), he's older, so I would think that would make him quieter... here's the video link : www.youtube.com/watch?v=SvvsXgqGl1I. They're asking
$10k for him, negotiable.

ummm well....the short answer is, not in my lifetime ;)

best

goodpony
Sep. 3, 2009, 10:07 AM
I went back and watched the video again....JMO but he doesnt seem to move through his back and drags his toes quite a bit behind. Im not an expert but most of the time he isnt connected and I'd be interested in seeing his reactions when he is asked to work a little more round over his topline (in trot and canter). Just judging by what I can see of him naked he doesnt look like he has appropriate muscling for a pony who's been working correctly. IMO his canter looks short and shuffling at least in this video. As strictly a dressage prospect I think you could do better for the money. As an all around kids mount he could very well be worth every penny.

rabicon
Sep. 3, 2009, 10:30 AM
The Palo pony is just not worth 10K for dressage. The pony doesn't readily work from behind and round into the bit. Watch the half halts the girl is giving, the are very noticeable because he is not listening to sudtle ones probably and he doesn't want to push into the bit and round like he should. His whole look to me looks artificial and is in a "frame" more than anything. He is off balance and just because he can "do" leg yields and shoulder/haunches in/out doesn't mean he is a 2nd level dressage horse nor possibly 3rd. My horse does all the above and we are in traning level!! Why, because the amount of collection they start asking for in 2nd level he is not ready for, nor is this pony. He is not muscled well for correct 2nd level work either. My horse also now does rollbacks (we taught this for fun) and neck reins but that doesn't mean he is ready for the reining/cutting pen. :no: If you are really really set on the palo. I'd offer no more than 5K for the pony and that is high IMO also. I don't want to sound mean, believe me, but I don't want you to have the wool pulled over your eyes either. Has the horse been shown at 2nd level??? Or even 1st??? I'd want scores in training in the high 60's for 10K for a pony. JMO. Also is he lengthen in the trot yet?? If not then he is not even in 1st level yet. He also doesn't show much bend at all yet on his circles. He is cute, I'll give him that, and could possibly be a nice dressage pony for lower levels with some more work. The question is do you want to do that work or do you want something that is ready to go?

Jealoushe
Sep. 3, 2009, 11:20 AM
So, I 've got two prospects going here, that I'm thinking of buying. (But only one!) One is a 14-year, 14 hand Un-registered Welsh, who's being sold because his owner, a 14-year-old girl, wants to move up to the 4 foot + jumpers (heaven help her!). I love the way his temperment looks (with her, anyway!:), he's older, so I would think that would make him quieter... here's the video link : www.youtube.com/watch?v=SvvsXgqGl1I. They're asking
$10k for him, negotiable.


I think the Palomino is more of a walking horse than a welsh. Way over priced IMO

Ambrey
Sep. 3, 2009, 11:38 AM
Again, ponies that jump bring a premium. Honies that don't are much cheaper for the same dressage potential (a horse that is above the 14.2 limit for h/j ponies). There is a lot of range in between 16.2 and 13 hands.

If you are looking for dressage bang for your buck, you will be much better off with something that has not competed in h/j.

You can get a LOT more pony for $10k if you get something without the h/j show miles.

GallantGesture
Sep. 3, 2009, 12:52 PM
I agree with everyone else. That palomino is cute cute cute!!!! But... if you haven't ridden him, you don't know if you will be getting what you want from him (temperment, training) and his price tag is high because he jumps. Ponytude is a bad, bad thing. They all look so sweet and innocent, but especially the ones that have been handled by kids have been allowed to get away with all sorts of stuff and are just naughty.

For the money you are looking at spending, you should be able to find something with more solid dressage training, either something fancy with a solid start, or something a little less fancy with some actual miles. There's lots of smaller horses out there that are going for less $$ just because they are under 16 hands, and not warmbloods.

This summer I picked up a very fancy tb mare that is 15.1, she was a bargain I'm sure because of her height, but the way she moves makes her everything I need in my prospect because I kinda like riding the smaller horses! The has brains and beauty, no spook, no buck, just enough forward to be fun. I also have a 15.2 qh that is not as fancy, but has done EVERYTHING. He's shown dressage, hunters, wp, and has done mini events. He's trail ridden everywhere, he's been a little girl's horse and a husband's horse. Now he's my school horse, and everyone just loves him... but one of my students won at a recognized show on him this summer! So he's got solid training in there if someone knows how to ride. But he's an off-breed for dressage, and small, so probably you could find one like him in your budget.

I think for you, a small horse with a good mind and solid basic training (or more), ideally some show and/or trail experience would be good (so you know how they handle those sorts of things). Something you can grow with and not out of. And in your case, I think it's very important that you can ride the horse before you buy... multiple times. You need a horse that you trust, and a horse that is going to work with you and not challenge you or take advantage of you. That part is tricky to buy over the internet! Also, a good trainer that understands your situation and can help you find and then become comfortable riding your new horse would be a plus!

Good luck!!

exvet
Sep. 3, 2009, 12:57 PM
Small is easier to sit if there is an incident. :lol:

I have a 13 hand section C welsh that is the epitome of the breed standard. He is a to die for mover and very sweet but positively ornery and very smart. He will get you off in a New York minute and you'll be wondering what the hell happened 'cause he's that quick. I've come off of him 3 times in the 10 months I've had him. His MO if he doesn't want to be ridden is to wait until just as you barely get ready to sit in the saddle and then he rears, bucks and goes to town. You have to have super strength velcro to overcome the short back, G-forces and spin that this pony can whip out. There is no room (quite literally) for forgiveness. Now when he's already going I do have the advantage and don't come off but that's because I'm ready and in good position. He was given to me for free because everyone else gave up trying to get on and/or ride him. His previous owner spent more than $25,000 on him. So if you still think small is easier to sit if there's an incident, here I have some reins to hand over to you and a timer...................:winkgrin:

http://i122.photobucket.com/albums/o253/ldarling_photos/August%202009/2009-08-021324.jpg

http://i122.photobucket.com/albums/o253/ldarling_photos/August%202009/2009-08-021447.jpg

Price of the above - $0 and though I can get really good scores with him, and he's quite capable to go up the levels there are some trade-offs ;)

Now in contrast I also have a 14.1 hand Welsh cob x Morgan mare who has not been able to get me off simply because there is so much back and barrel there. She's in no way long in the back but if she even tries to move out from under me or unseat me there's still plenty of forgiveness.

http://i122.photobucket.com/albums/o253/ldarling_photos/Flagstaff/DSC_0613.jpg

http://i122.photobucket.com/albums/o253/ldarling_photos/Flagstaff/DSC_0552.jpg

The above won this first level class (1st 3 I think) two weeks ago. She was a CDE pony and had only been backed when I purchased her for $4000 about 2 years ago.

As for the question from the OP. I agree with the others. You can get so much more DRESSAGE pony for the buck than what you're presenting us. The palomino appears to be long in the back and weak through the loin as well as the other issues already mentioned. He is going to have a harder time collecting, not impossible but coming from one who has a long backed welsh, it's a challenge you could avoid. Ambrey is also right but only to a point. Once a 14.3+ critter gets much more training on it beyond say 1st level, the financial advantage diminishes quickly.

Here is another example. This is my pony/hony. I purchased him for $4000 as a two year old who had just flunked driving training.

http://i122.photobucket.com/albums/o253/ldarling_photos/Flagstaff/Trotinwarmup.jpg

http://i122.photobucket.com/albums/o253/ldarling_photos/Flagstaff/DSC_0313.jpg

http://i122.photobucket.com/albums/o253/ldarling_photos/Flagstaff/DSC_0162.jpg

http://i122.photobucket.com/albums/o253/ldarling_photos/Flagstaff/DSC_0167.jpg

He has not had any "official" jumping training though we are going to do a hunter pace next month 'cause he can jump. He is trained to FEI (by me) and though he was peanuts to buy in the beginning he's priceless to me now and even with all his faults you could not buy him for the prices you're discussing; so even at the hony height level you will pay a higher price as their training advances. He's around 15 hands but all pony.

I've become wiser in my choices as I've purchased/been given more ponies. The next two coming up the ranks have shorter backs, are well connected, and move more like sport/dressage horses. I'll let you know if the journey's really easier but I'm damn sure holding these people to it ;) 'cause they do have what it takes & I'm ready for one of those piece of cake types :lol:.

So I would suggest to keep looking and/or pass on the two described.

Ambrey
Sep. 3, 2009, 01:15 PM
Ambrey is also right but only to a point. Once a 14.3+ critter gets much more training on it beyond say 1st level, the financial advantage diminishes quickly.

Yes, of course :) All that training doesn't come cheap! But then again getting a horse already going well at that level carries a lot less risk than getting a prospect.

I guess my point was, why get a horse that is already going well in an expensive niche as a prospect for another discipline? You would be paying for the training it already has (h/j) and then paying again to train to the new discipline, and you run the risk that he won't enjoy it, won't hold up, etc.

The honies over 14.2 aren't really part of that h/j niche. They might jump, but they can't compete in the pony classes and they (usually) can't compete with the big guys (teddy excepted). Once they become dressage horses they have their own niche, but as prospects they usually go cheaper, to people like you ;)

smilton
Sep. 3, 2009, 01:26 PM
There are too many horses available to not find exactly what you are looking for in that price range. Keep looking if you have any doubts.

exvet
Sep. 3, 2009, 02:05 PM
Ambrey I wasn't disagreeing with you. I did, though, want to make sure that the OP understands that just because it's a hony and is likely not competitive or highly sought after in the hunter venue doesn't automatically equal cheap or even less expensive. If it's green/a prospect and hasn't been proven then yes you can often economize on that point; however, training and miles does add to the price. Now do I think my critter would be in the same price range as a taller, more suitable and socially acceptable dressage horse? - no way. I could get perhaps 8000-10,000 for him tops; and that is a huge reason why I wouldn't sell him. He would cost way more to replace than what someone would be willing to pay; but, that actually has more to do with his breed and conformation than it does with his height or training.

Ember
Sep. 3, 2009, 02:16 PM
I'd like to throw Morgans into the mix if you're looking for a little big horse. I do agree with everyone else as far as price goes on these ponies.

Here's a quick dreamhorse search. You can find something much more suitable with more training. If you're looking for small you have A LOT of options!

http://www.dreamhorse.com/show_list.php3?form_adv_search=Y&form_breed_id[]=2&form_breed_id[]=78&form_breed_id[]=166&form_breed_id[]=112&form_breed_id[]=24&form_distance=&form_zip_code=&form_area=0&form_name_position=CONTAINS&form_name=&form_words=&form_position=CONTAINS&form_bloodline=&form_generation=1&form_skill_id=5&form_days=0&form_gender[]=Any+Gender&form_min_age=0&form_max_age=0&form_year_foaled=0&form_color[]=Any+Color&form_other_color=&form_min_height=0&form_max_height=0&form_min_weight=0&form_max_weight=0&form_min_price=0&form_max_price=10000&form_min_temp=0&form_max_temp=0&form_sold_only=0&form_at_stud_yn=N&form_sort_by=NEW&form_rows=200

poltroon
Sep. 3, 2009, 02:31 PM
Small is easier to sit if there is an incident. :lol:

I have a 13 hand section C welsh that is the epitome of the breed standard. He is a to die for mover and very sweet but positively ornery and very smart. He will get you off in a New York minute and you'll be wondering what the hell happened 'cause he's that quick. I've come off of him 3 times in the 10 months I've had him.

I don't doubt you. I've sat on plenty of athletic ponies that can drop me if the mood suits. I'm just saying that he'd be even MORE powerful if he was 17 hands! :D

exvet
Sep. 3, 2009, 02:40 PM
I'm just saying that he'd be even MORE powerful if he was 17 hands!

Now that is a truly scarey and diabolical thought :winkgrin:

IronHorse
Sep. 3, 2009, 02:43 PM
Here is a pony that is currently for sale at a local barn. The pony is doing FEI Jr - not sure what the asking price is though.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UYCcBynV3H8&feature=fvw

http://sonnenhofstables.ca/saleslist.php

mp
Sep. 3, 2009, 04:27 PM
exvet, I love your ponies. They're beautiful and beautifully ridden.

OP, add me to the chorus of people who say small doesn't mean they can't get you off. My mare is 14.2 and she can jump right out from under you. She's not being crafty, she's just quick and her go-to spook move is the 180 drop shoulder. She's there one second and the next you're looking down at empty air where the saddle used to be.

If a safe, sane ride is your goal, look for temperament, not size. And if dressage is your goal, look for a horse that's been trained and shown in it.

Good luck.

JWB
Sep. 3, 2009, 04:43 PM
These are not mine.... I know NOTHING about them. Just a quick search through for what you can get out there. TONS of good safe horses out there for a lot less $. All of these are between 14 & 15 hands.... It's a great size!!! I'm just saying find the right one.

http://www.dreamhorse.com/show_horse.php?form_horse_id=1448229&share_this=Y - Looks very safe

http://www.dreamhorse.com/show_horse.php?form_horse_id=1427611&share_this=Y - Can't tell. I think the picture doesn't do it justice.

http://www.dreamhorse.com/show_horse.php?form_horse_id=1415030&share_this=Y - Again, looks very safe. I actually emailed this one to a friend because it looks perfect for her lesson programs. Love a QHxArab!!!

http://www.dreamhorse.com/show_horse.php?form_horse_id=1412241&share_this=Y -CUTE!!!

http://www.dreamhorse.com/show_horse.php?form_horse_id=1401736&share_this=Y - Tiny Hanoverian (14.2) for $8500.... She doesn't like to jump. If she did, she'd probably be an expensive pony hunter.

poltroon
Sep. 3, 2009, 04:45 PM
I get the sense that people are trying to dissuade the OP from a smaller horse/pony. At 5'2" a pony is absolutely appropriate, and she will have far more influence over him and find him far more ridable than the equivalent temperament and athletic ability as a larger horse. In turn, that will give her more confidence.

I agree that the right temperament is certainly important; a smaller size doesn't guarantee that the individual will build her confidence. But I also think it's very appropriate for her to limit her search to 15.2 and under, say. Still gotta look at each one as an individual, is all. ;)

Ambrey
Sep. 3, 2009, 06:24 PM
Here is a pony that is currently for sale at a local barn. The pony is doing FEI Jr - not sure what the asking price is though.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UYCcBynV3H8&feature=fvw

http://sonnenhofstables.ca/saleslist.php

*swoon*

Sparkling_Sunset
Sep. 3, 2009, 07:35 PM
I get the sense that people are trying to dissuade the OP from a smaller horse/pony. At 5'2" a pony is absolutely appropriate, and she will have far more influence over him and find him far more ridable than the equivalent temperament and athletic ability as a larger horse. In turn, that will give her more confidence.

I agree that the right temperament is certainly important; a smaller size doesn't guarantee that the individual will build her confidence. But I also think it's very appropriate for her to limit her search to 15.2 and under, say. Still gotta look at each one as an individual, is all. ;)

THANK YOU!!! :)

rabicon
Sep. 3, 2009, 07:43 PM
JWB I love the hano.;)

exvet
Sep. 3, 2009, 08:23 PM
I am certainly not trying to disuade the OP from buying A pony just not either of these ponies for which the question was posed. I too would put disposition first and foremost in the selection process. I agree with goodpony too in that height is only one dimension to consider when buying a pony. How wide sprung it is or not can make a huge difference in how it rides. I prefer the wider models myself. I'm only 5'2" and 104 lbs but if my section C didn't have the amount of barrel and frame that he does there is no way I could comfortably ride him. Once we get the mounting behind us he's very comfortable to ride without me looking too big for him. Also ponies can be very deceptive in how big or small they really are. I always encourage anyone to ride the beast first to get a feel for fit (as well as all the other benefits to riding a prospect before hand). My most massive looking guy is actually my narrowest in terms of saddle fit. My mare who is pictured and my 3 year old stallion are far rounder/wider and you would never guess it by just looking at them 'cause they both appear more refined. One just never knows until they throw a leg over :winkgrin:

Heck I'm for more owning pony power not fewer.

Liz Steacie
Sep. 3, 2009, 08:36 PM
Here is a pony that is currently for sale at a local barn. The pony is doing FEI Jr - not sure what the asking price is though.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UYCcBynV3H8&feature=fvw

http://sonnenhofstables.ca/saleslist.php

I have seen this pony going at the shows and it is a wonderful pony ... you really couldn't go wrong with this one, I don't think!

DreamsOfGP
Sep. 3, 2009, 09:40 PM
Hello. I had to join this board just to jump in on this conversation. I love my dressage ponies so much! I have a 13.3 Welsh who was given to me because he was a dirty stopper and dumped everyone. Well, I took the jumping out of the equation and he is a super dressage pony! I originally intended to sell him, but have grown very attached. Hopefully, it's okay to brag and post some pics? (Ignore the sale ad and old video!)

http://lakesregiondressage.com/edison.cfm

Anyway, to the OP, you should be able to get a nice pony for that price range. When I was trying to sell this guy, I had him listed at $8,500. I sold another pony that I showed third level last winter for $15,000. I'd keep looking and find something with miles in the dressage ring. Where are you located? I can keep an eye out for you if you're near me (I'm in New Hampshire). Everyone knows I love ponies and I get lots of sale ponies forwarded to me. Have you thought about looking into proven pony club ponies that maybe can't event hard anymore?

Petstorejunkie
Sep. 3, 2009, 10:01 PM
You have found some VERY overpriced ponies for what you want to do. keep looking 14.3 is not a bad thing. especially when it knocks a few k off the price tag

i should mention (i'm 5'9") that the only critters to dump me in my adult career were below 14.2h fwiw

exvet
Sep. 3, 2009, 10:14 PM
exvet, I love your ponies. They're beautiful and beautifully ridden.

Thank you. I"m kind of partial to them myself even the little stinker.

Tamara in TN
Sep. 4, 2009, 11:38 AM
[QUOTE=poltroon;4351089]I get the sense that people are trying to dissuade the OP from a smaller horse/pony. At 5'2" a pony is absolutely appropriate,

correct,but what she's shown are overpriced for their age,conformation and "gifts" the Lord gave them in comparison to what she'd like to do with them ;)

best

Nanerpus
Sep. 4, 2009, 01:38 PM
Hello. I had to join this board just to jump in on this conversation. I love my dressage ponies so much! I have a 13.3 Welsh who was given to me because he was a dirty stopper and dumped everyone. Well, I took the jumping out of the equation and he is a super dressage pony! I originally intended to sell him, but have grown very attached. Hopefully, it's okay to brag and post some pics? (Ignore the sale ad and old video!)

http://lakesregiondressage.com/edison.cfm

Anyway, to the OP, you should be able to get a nice pony for that price range. When I was trying to sell this guy, I had him listed at $8,500. I sold another pony that I showed third level last winter for $15,000. I'd keep looking and find something with miles in the dressage ring. Where are you located? I can keep an eye out for you if you're near me (I'm in New Hampshire). Everyone knows I love ponies and I get lots of sale ponies forwarded to me. Have you thought about looking into proven pony club ponies that maybe can't event hard anymore?

DreamsofGP: I saw you at Deer Creek:) I was also there showing a friends horse (not my pony) and thought your pony was fantastic and you put in a great ride! I was hoping to bring my pony (in my signature) up there for the last show but couldn't make it...but anyways, I thought you guys looked great!

Kate66
Sep. 4, 2009, 01:56 PM
exvet - your ponies and hony are absolutely fantastic! You look great on them and they look wonderful.

Op - I am 5'4" and about 130lbs and I would love a pony now!

pday09
Sep. 4, 2009, 02:54 PM
The palomino is a better fit for some pony club kid. The rider is too handsy, and he clearly doesn't listen. You can get much nicer dressage ponies in this market. Speaking of which, now is SO time to buy because you can get twice as much horse for the money as you could even a year ago. Hold out for something quieter and with better gaits.
I don't know about the other pony, but for 10,000 dollars you can get something better schooled and proven quiet. The perfect pony (I also recommend you look into small horses, 14.3-15 hh) is out there, and it's probably not a welsh, not to be "breed-ist," in my experience they're not the quietist ones (I still LOVE them though) you might want to look into a Morgan or something.

Tiligsmom
Sep. 4, 2009, 09:37 PM
This is the way I would go. I'm also 5'2" and decided to go small after having a large warmblood. This woman produces lovely mounts

http://www.franciscreekfjords.com/forSaleFCF.htm

DreamsOfGP
Sep. 4, 2009, 10:13 PM
Nanerpus: Thank you! It was a fun show and Ed was good as always. I didn't have time to get to the last two:-( I think we have a lot of mutual contacts. I've heard so much about you, but don't think we've officially met. Maybe next show season? I'm hoping to get out a lot more.

Nanerpus
Sep. 5, 2009, 09:10 PM
Nanerpus: Thank you! It was a fun show and Ed was good as always. I didn't have time to get to the last two:-( I think we have a lot of mutual contacts. I've heard so much about you, but don't think we've officially met. Maybe next show season? I'm hoping to get out a lot more.

I bet we know a lot of the same people :) How have you heard about me??? lol just curious:lol: (You can always PM me if you want). It's neat to know somebody on these boards from NH!

poltroon
Sep. 6, 2009, 01:11 PM
BTW, if the OP is showing in California, CDS has a special high score pony award at every recognized show.

narcisco
Sep. 6, 2009, 05:52 PM
In our neighborhood, the palomino pony would sell for $8000 to $12,000 as an adult dressage pony. He would clock around training level at USEF shows and win the high point pony awards at every show at training level. I think with a more "dressage" educated rider, he could easily do the same thing at first. He is rock steady with his connection, no matter what the rider does. He does not throw his head, even when she is bareback, cantering, no bridle, arms in the air.

You can't put a price on safety. If he were sound and in our area, I would be sending all small adults out to look at him as a dressage prospect.

The other one, I can't see, so I don't know.

This is my favorite one, ever. She was for sale, but I think getting close to six figures :)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=smgHHkhDs2k

mbm
Sep. 6, 2009, 07:03 PM
narcisco - you are saying they got almost 100,000 for that little arab mare?

that is insane. folks dont get that much for WBs with better training!

narcisco
Sep. 6, 2009, 07:12 PM
No, that was her asking price. She's "private treaty" now, so don't quote me.

The thing about that pony is that a caveman could ride her. A small adult with a modicum of talent could sit those easy gaits, smooth transitions, clean changes and get their silver medal very quickly. I disagree about the warmbloods having better training. I would guess they have better gaits but lower rideability.

I would say this pony has very short gaits, but very exceptional training to get the most out of limited gaits. It is because the gaits are short and the temperatment so sane that she has more rideability for an amateur than most warmbloods.

mbm
Sep. 6, 2009, 07:15 PM
oh, ok, i get that she looks to be an easy ride, easy gaits etc.

i guess i still dont think what i saw warrants 100k, which doesn't mean i don't think she is valuable , but that is a lot of dough..... <shakes head>

maybe i just dont have the wallet to understand :lol::lol::lol:

narcisco
Sep. 6, 2009, 07:22 PM
I'm with you. I remember the days when Hans Biss said about dressage, "there's no such thing as a $100,000 gelding." Those days are gone.