PDA

View Full Version : How thick is your barn concrete?



dmalbone
Sep. 2, 2009, 03:16 PM
The concrete in my mom's barn (converted from garage) is 4". We're trying to figure out if it's in the budget to do just underneath the stalls. These would be 12x15 areas. If you have concrete, how thick is yours? Our "concrete guy" is not a horse guy and has limited experience with horse barns so told us "he assumed it would need to be 6". Just not sure...

092556
Sep. 2, 2009, 03:56 PM
4" - wash rack, isle, tack room, stalls and driveway but that's in Florida, not sure about the effect of colder climates on concrete.

fivehorses
Sep. 2, 2009, 03:57 PM
again, do not recommend in stalls, why are you doing this?

Anyhow, minimum is 4", 6" is best.

dmalbone
Sep. 2, 2009, 04:19 PM
again, do not recommend in stalls, why are you doing this?

Anyhow, minimum is 4", 6" is best.
As shown by my last post I am obviously not the only person to consider concrete. I was/am merely asking for opinions and experiences in the last post and exploring options in this one. I get that you don't like concrete. I'm not sure how I feel about it yet, but when building a barn I think its smart to explore all of your options, which I'm attempting to do.

MSP
Sep. 3, 2009, 11:09 AM
The edge boards where 2x4s so probably 31/2" - 4". I originally skipped the stalls and just concreted the feed room and isle. I have gone back and poured concrete under the area of the feed tub (in one stall) because of the mess my old horse makes with his wet feed.

I would concrete the stalls if the barn had issues with mud but other than that it is just an added expense and you need to protect the horses from the hard surface.

Elghund2
Sep. 3, 2009, 11:45 AM
It also depends on if you reinforce with rebar. Ours is 4" reinforced.

sk_pacer
Sep. 3, 2009, 11:57 AM
I have concrete, probably 6" thick plus footings....and it is 60 years old, only a couple of surface cracks and I'm not sure there is rebar in there, never asked, and certainly was never told. Oddly, when I had to turn the horses loose inside last winter, they would still go lie down on the concrete (bedded) because the rest of the 'floor' is dirt and very uneven. They were turned loose because of many blizzards last winter that limited me to one trip a day to the barn in daylight when I had some visibility.....oh and it gets cold here, long stretches of sub-zero temps and horrendous windchills.

I also don't have mats but bed deeply with straw.

Gloria
Sep. 4, 2009, 11:55 AM
Our barn floor is 4" throughout. That is the minimum requirement I believe for horse stalls and for a small tractor to be driven on it. You do need to make sure that no horse (and no machine) is on it until it is thoroughly cured. Some even suggest spraying water on it so it cures slowly if you are having a dry spell. I personally love the concrete floor in stalls with mat on top of it and will not do anything different.

Cougar85
Sep. 4, 2009, 11:57 AM
My barn in NC. 4 inches with rubber mats over it. Many years old now, and still perfect.

Janet
Sep. 4, 2009, 02:08 PM
I am pretty sure mine is 4" (don't remember if it is reinforced or not). I have rubber mats over concrete, but in the past I have just used deep bedding over concrete.

deltawave
Sep. 4, 2009, 03:04 PM
Four inches.

JSwan
Sep. 4, 2009, 03:20 PM
OP -

I think what you're saying is that the concrete is not part of the structure, right? You're just pouring it into the stalls - it doesn't support posts or load bearing walls.

If that's correct, I think you can go with 4 inches.

If you want to increase the strength of the concrete and reduce cracking, ask the concrete company if they can add fiber to the concrete mix. You won't notice it's there - it's not a mesh (though some people put that down).

It may not be worth the extra money to you - I can't recall how much it cost but if it was horrible I would remember, I think. I'm pretty frugal.

Not sure if you're putting gravel down or anything else like rebar or a mesh.

Hope that helps. :)

KrazyTBMare
Sep. 4, 2009, 03:24 PM
My barn was preexisting on dirt. We had concrete poured for the aisles and stalls. It is all 4" thick. I had them dig the stalls out so that when the concrete was in, the stalls were 1-1.5" lower than the aisle. That way, after putting in the mats and all, there would still be a tiny ledge to help keep the bedding IN the stalls.

My concrete does not support the building or anything like that. I LOVE it and after the barns Ive been in with packed stone dust floors and the likes, they all feel the same in hardness.

sidepasser
Sep. 4, 2009, 06:18 PM
4 inches in stalls and in feed and tack room and washrack
8 inches in aisleway for large trucks to drive in.

works for me and has since 1987.

sidepasser
Sep. 4, 2009, 06:21 PM
oh and it does matter what PSI you have:

my barn aisle 6500 psi and tested.

rest of barn - 5,000 psi and tested. Testing is cheap. Concrete suppliers can and will "water down" concrete, make sure to test using a break test. 21 day break test should tell you your strength.

I don't like the fiber reinforced concrete, I prefer the old fashioned re-bar or welded wire.

Oh and in case you wonder - been a construction site person in previous life building roads, wastewater treatment plants and water treatment plants.

Pay the 400-500 for testing. It is well worth it.