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claire
Aug. 27, 2009, 05:07 PM
Wonderful story.
http://www.bokt.nl/forums/viewtopic.php?sid=&f=11&t=1161580

(Very loose translation :lol: )


Adelinde Cornelissen: No Money but Gold

Dressage Amazon Adelinde Cornelissen gave over one years ago, her job as an English teacher in order to be professional athlete. She dared to follow her dream. That was Thursday at the European title fight in Windsor in a paid hit. The Drenthe won gold in the Grand Prix Special.
Parzival rode with them a world record, 84.042 percent.

When asked whether they already believed, she could quickly answer: 'No''.
The road followed Cornelissen has been unparalleled. She started at a time when Parzival the owner of the animal could not lose the cobblestones. The ring was the horse to speak more back than forward.

Cornelissen (30) but knew that there was future. "After my second lap on this horse, I thought: Wow! This is it. But that feeling lasted three steps. Then it stopped. But I thought: If it takes three minutes later again. And then five. Then I can come pretty far.''

Thus Cornelissen at the European Championship unofficially the best in the world. With the team they had already won gold in the national competition. She was the second Dutch, after Anky van Grunsven, who won a European Championship individual.
They defeated the Windsor Castle estate of the stud be untouchable Moorlands Totilas Edward Gal.

The latter did not initially Cornelissen. She stepped out of the ring and congratulated Gal. "I thought he had won."
But Gal, who grossierde in tens, even just made too many mistakes. "With Totilas I miss the experience." This is normal at this stage of his career. The animal is still young.''
and so was Adelinde Cornelissen European champion with a phenomenal pilot.

The Cornelissen which alone in the professional circuit with a trailer for the game comes. A truck does not.
The Cornelissen in a terraced house in Beilen and lives on the bike to the stable of her horse, to train.

She thanked Thursday Sjef Janssen, the coach. Once every two weeks she drives him to Parsifal, for always two days to train. Since then, her scores improved. Of seventy percent to over eighty.

The last winter won Cornelissen, national champion in 2008, suddenly three consecutive World Cup qualifications.
Before she was at the Olympic Games in Hong Kong have been reserve.
But the World Cup Final in Las Vegas Parzival was injured. "Veterinarian January Greve has helped me on the horse time to get fit.''

A contest then drove in Hickstead.
There Janssen gave her the chance to still qualify for the title race at Windsor. She seized that opportunity. Cornelissen understands the art to perform as it should.

Parzival is, according to experts, by now one or two miljoentje worth.
Co-owner Henk see a sale price is down.
Cornelissen, with her father, the other half owner: "I do not sell my half. I would go with Parzival. As part of his hand he does know. I do not. Never.''
No money, or gold.

How to proceed? Cornelissen, "I just keep driving. That is clear. Of the horse I could buy the other half? No, then I think I take a few extra hyphoteken. I have no sponsor. If one would come, that might be helpful.''

egontoast
Aug. 27, 2009, 09:43 PM
She started at a time when Parzival the owner of the animal could not lose the cobblestones. The ring was the horse to speak more back than forward.



I see.

claire
Aug. 27, 2009, 10:15 PM
Quote:
She started at a time when Parzival the owner of the animal could not lose the cobblestones. The ring was the horse to speak more back than forward.

I see.


:lol: Gotta love some of these Google translations.

Most, I can sort of figure out, but this :confused:


Maybe, someone could do a better translation of the original Dutch article?

BaroquePony
Aug. 27, 2009, 10:27 PM
Originally Posted by egontoast

She started at a time when Parzival the owner of the animal could not lose the cobblestones. The ring was the horse to speak more back than forward.

I see.

Gotta love some of these Google translations.

Most, I can sort of figure out, but this

Maybe it was meant to translate as "... couldn't get the lead out of his @$$".

(sorry, couldn't resist :rolleyes:)

canyonoak
Aug. 28, 2009, 12:14 AM
I have a lot of love for Parzival and great admiration for Adelinde Cornelissen and her progression down the long road.

That said--I just don't find ANY story these days as great an inspiration as Hilda Gurney and Keen.

Hilda went to the Olympics in Mexico and saw a new kind of horse for dressage--she saw big frame big-bone German warmbloods. Horses with a real motor .

SO she looked around in California for something approximate--and found Keen, an American Thoroughbred, born and bred. Way too large to make his way around the fast turns of the California tracks, the owner finally agreed to sell him for $1500, so he could buy a fancy cow.

But the inspiring part of the story (for me) is that Hilda and Keen forged a partnership that was legendary; that was acknowledged all over the world of dressage; that won them an Olympic team bronze; that put her in a position to turn down/accept blank checks for her partner (she said No Thank You).

And that she accomplished all this while teaching school full-time. Emotionally disadvantaged children.
ANd she accomplished all this at a time when dressage was not particularly popular in the US; when there was no such thing as a sponsor as the term is used today; pretty much on her own, and with a bit of help from clinicians here and there.

What is it about big chestnut horses? Because Keen at the start was just as unfocused, just as unsettled and without a doubt, even more of a handful than Parzival.

Anyway--just want to firmly state my love and admiration for yet another big red horse.
<g>

Coreene
Aug. 28, 2009, 12:40 AM
Claire, it was not a bad translation. Adelinde had a sponsor who pulled out after HK, but the market had a lot to do with it. She recently got the ride on another nice horse (IIRC it is still small tour), and switching to Sjef for training has made a giant difference. My guess is that the sponsors will come in spades. Far cry from her stint as a teacher, but she can absolutely say she made the right choice.

claire
Aug. 28, 2009, 11:58 PM
Coreene for adding to the story of Adelinde and Parzival.
Talking about sponsors: What's not to love about this pair?

Beautiful schoolteacher becomes an international Dressage star with her big fancy chestnut steed! :winkgrin:

And canyonoak, what a lovely background story about Hilda Gurney and Keen.

I did not realize Keen was that big (17 hands?)

Gotta love those big fancy chestnut boys! :lol:

Sabine
Aug. 29, 2009, 01:08 AM
Oh- just loving this story - Hilda's and Adelinde's....way to go and soo inspiring...somehow I have no fear that the right thing will happen for Adelinde...somewhat wish that Hilda was 25 again...haha!

Love big chestnuts- especially red mares....:)!

canyonoak
Aug. 29, 2009, 10:48 AM
Oh Sabine-- Keen was around 17.2. I think he sticked at 17. 1 1/2.

He was A Wild Thing when younger. Hilda took him away from home every weekend to get him to the point where he would stay in the arena...and there was a LOOOONG period where she would enter at A, halt at X and really have no idea what was going to happen next!

But that horse could be eating grass, having a roll, whatever--and he would hear her voice and just rise up on his hooves and look for her.

Her school put in a tiny patch of grass, and she would bring Keen and they would perform for the kids..a patch of grass not much bigger than a 24' corral.

Of course, these days, no one would do this with a top FEI horse, let alone a priceless Olympic medal winner.

Marieke
Aug. 31, 2009, 10:31 AM
Parcival was no sweetheart in his younger days, the 'loose the cobblestones' meant he (the owner) couldn't find a rider for that horse. Many professionals turned him away as the horse was a true looney booney. And I mean looney booney. Nobody was willing to risk it. Adelinde and I rode at the same manege when younger and I visited her and saw her ride him in maybe 2001? I was looking for a horse to buy, and back then he was for sale between <10k. I never even got on him, too crazy for me. He broke her arm like a week later.

She did a fabulous job. Nobody believed she would get this far with that horse, locally. Her parents are nice people who breed a few horses, and that is what she rode when younger.

Way to go!

torontodressage
Aug. 31, 2009, 11:58 AM
http://www.topdressage.tv/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?f=14&t=145

claire
Sep. 1, 2009, 04:31 AM
Parcival was no sweetheart in his younger days, the 'loose the cobblestones' meant he (the owner) couldn't find a rider for that horse. Many professionals turned him away as the horse was a true looney booney. And I mean looney booney. Nobody was willing to risk it. Adelinde and I rode at the same manege when younger and I visited her and saw her ride him in maybe 2001? I was looking for a horse to buy, and back then he was for sale between <10k. I never even got on him, too crazy for me. He broke her arm like a week later.

She did a fabulous job. Nobody believed she would get this far with that horse, locally. Her parents are nice people who breed a few horses, and that is what she rode when younger.

Way to go!


Thanks Marieke for sharing your personal experience of Parzival and Adelinde.

Explains some of the remarks about her ridng technique (rides leaning back on the contact/rides w/hand brake on)

I found this interesting also in Astrid's EuroDressage report on the Parzivals kur:

http://www.eurodressage.com/reports/shows/2009/09ec/rep_grandprixkur.html


While Cornelissen's Special ride was an absolutely highlight in its precision, punctuation and softness, Parzival did look a bit harder in the bridle in the kur and the rider was leaning in the contact a bit too much.

By the end of the ride, Cornelissen was ahead of her music which showed in the extended trot and final passage.

Cornelissen : "I was very satisfied with the first part of my test but then got ahead of the music and had to slow down. I couldn't ride to the full."

Cornelissen will go home and fine-tune her freestyle even more. "At home during training, the Kur fits exactly with Parzival's movements, but in the show ring it is like he gives it more," Cornelissen told the Dutch Equestrian Federation. "His strides become longer and in no time I'm ahead of the music.

It shouldn't be like that and in this freestyle I had to ride again with the hand brake on which meddles with the expressiveness of Parzival's gaits. It's a pity but we'll have to work on it."

Marieke
Sep. 1, 2009, 08:03 PM
NOthing but hats off to Adelinde, but to explain the 'hand brakes', she broke her arm giving 'counterpressure' and it snapped her upper arm, muscles, tendons, the whole thing. I guess it wasn't pretty.

mbm
Sep. 1, 2009, 10:55 PM
sorry, do you mean she broke her arm pulling on the horses mouth? that cant be right?

Fixerupper
Sep. 1, 2009, 11:11 PM
Adelinde Corelissen: Amazing Cinderella Story!

Cornelissen

could Claire (OP) please ammend the spelling in the thread title...it's probably just me.... but it makes me :sigh: whenever I read it

thx

claire
Sep. 2, 2009, 08:23 AM
Fixerupper, Sorry for the typo :uhoh:

Hope you can go from :sigh: to :D and enjoy this thread! :winkgrin:

Mozart
Sep. 3, 2009, 02:41 PM
I see.

Be it on your head that computer monitor is now sporting beef and barley soup....

Cat - OnceUponADressageDream
Sep. 4, 2009, 09:27 AM
What a fantastic success story it has been for Adelinde then! One of our very own South Australian dressage rider/trainer/coach/queen types (I say that very affectionately, she is brilliant!) is currently "over there" and is lucky enough to be training with Adelinde for the next few weeks. This was all planned well before anyone really knew who she was here, but I bet everyone will be flocking to our rider for lessons when she gets back!

slc2
Sep. 5, 2009, 09:32 AM
I would hazard a guess, that this horse has gone from less than ten thousand dollars, to close to over a million, difficult or not. He's won enough that he's worth a lot of money. That's when owners sell. And quite often, the savvy trainer works something out and gets to keep competing the horse.

feetofclay1678
Sep. 5, 2009, 10:16 AM
i cannot understand harldy even a word of this:(

Marieke
Sep. 7, 2009, 09:04 AM
sorry, do you mean she broke her arm pulling on the horses mouth? that cant be right?

yes that is right.

She wasn't pulling back just to clarify, but he would literally rip at your arms.

slc2
Sep. 7, 2009, 10:13 AM
That makes a lot more sense than her pulling back so hard she broke her own arm, LOL! My friend had a field hunter that I think gave her a wopping case of tendinitis - she used to say he about broke her arm snagging the reins. He would do it very fast and forcefully, didn't like to stay at the back of the field.