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View Full Version : Conformation video w/Michael Matz, etc.



wonderland9
Aug. 27, 2009, 11:54 AM
I don't think there are many video resources out there focusing on racehorse conformation, specifically, but this one was just released by the Blood-Horse:

Conformation for Performance DVD: This hour-long, step-by-step guide for assessing conformation features Kentucky Derby-winning trainer Michael Matz, Keeneland sales inspector Ryan Mahan, Fasig-Tipton sales inspector Bill Graves, and noted bloodstock agent Buzz Chace... (exclusivelyequine.com/conformation)

It features Michael Matz, which I find interesting. I wonder if he uses any of the Barbaro bros as examples, haha. If someone sees it, I'd be interested to know if it's a good resource.

Absolut Equestrian
Aug. 27, 2009, 12:38 PM
You can watch a short preview here:

http://www.bloodhorse.com/horse-racing/videos/watch/E0E67A5E-21D1-40B6-BD65-9FFFF2688692

Barnfairy
Aug. 27, 2009, 02:14 PM
Nothing against Michael Matz, but the person whose brain I'd really like to pick on the subject (especially from a racing point of view) is D. Wayne Lukas. Love him or hate him, you can't deny the man's got an eye for horses.

caffeinated
Aug. 27, 2009, 02:22 PM
I was sort of thinking the same thing barnfairy :) I love the guy, but his history in the racing business is relatively short, really, isn't it?

I'd be interested in seeing it anyway, because I love learning more about conformation. Judy Wardrope also has some neat stuff out there about conformation for racing too, if you search her website.

Barnfairy
Aug. 27, 2009, 02:32 PM
I'd be interested in seeing it anyway, because I love learning more about conformation. Me too! Even if it is "just" Michael Matz. ;) :lol:

minnie
Aug. 28, 2009, 08:42 AM
Watched the preview and if the rest of the video is similar you would learn absolutely nothing.

Vindicated
Aug. 28, 2009, 01:22 PM
Personally, given Matz' history. I would prefer his opinion over Lukas.

Skin me if you like-but would'nt it make more sense to breed a horse that looks like may have a future after 2?

On the Farm
Aug. 28, 2009, 03:16 PM
Personally, given Matz' history. I would prefer his opinion over Lukas.

Skin me if you like-but would'nt it make more sense to breed a horse that looks like may have a future after 2?

Given Matz's record with big horses, his are only making it to three.

Back to the original topic, I remember watching a conformation video several years ago that used the opinions of different trainers, breeders, bloodstock agents, etc. One trainer of note stated that he would never buy a horse turned out in the left front, but didn't mind that much if it was turned out in the right. Later in the video, another expert offered the advice that he didn't mind if a horse were turned out in the left front, but wouldn't touch a horse turned out in the right.

Hi Profile
Aug. 30, 2009, 01:53 AM
I was sort of thinking the same thing barnfairy :) I love the guy, but his history in the racing business is relatively short, really, isn't it?

I'd be interested in seeing it anyway, because I love learning more about conformation. Judy Wardrope also has some neat stuff out there about conformation for racing too, if you search her website.

Thank you Caffeinated!! I had no idea Judy also focussed on racing. Form to function has always intrigued me and I'd been to Judy's talks at Equine affair so finding out about this was just perfect.

I bought the racing ebook online and have hardly pulled myself away from it. As advertised, 250 or more pages and tons of photos, 400 or 500 I think. Mostly conformation photos and notes on 'functional' conformation along with race records of the horse, the sire and the dam sire. Wow is this ever a handy way to look at racehorses!!

Its nice to see horses from so many places but it was particularly interesting for me to see the notes on the ones that ran here in the west. I find myself saying 'well that explains it' as I look at photos and read about the horses I know.

My husband even joined me because he likes the mechanical explanations! No arguemnets about spending too much time on horses.

I'm off and running now.

Pronzini
Aug. 30, 2009, 07:30 AM
There's a video out there featuring Bob Baffert in which he pulls an unraced two year old out pointing out his strengths and weaknesses. It turned out to be Real Quiet.

No offense to Matz but he has a lot of wood to chop before he's in Baffert's or Lukas' league when it comes to evaluating conformation and unraced horses.

Hi Profile
Aug. 30, 2009, 06:51 PM
The video with Baffert and others at sales was ok but not specific enough for me to really learn what I wanted to know. Much better if the descriptions are accomanied by explanations of how, why, where, etc.

farmgirl88
Aug. 30, 2009, 07:06 PM
and you can flame me for this one too:

I dont care what racing folks say about it. No matter how good the horse is put together, racing and training from under 2 years and around that general age is not good for a young animal, at all. they are still growing, nothing has fused yet, and they still have 4 more years of growing left to do. its really, honestly, no surprise that its very difficult to try and find a clean horse off the track. there is always something wrong, its just a matter of finding it. we have 3 year olds on the racing circuit with many bone chips in their legs, splints, tendon and suspensory issues, etc. maybe if they wern't hammered on at such a young age, none of them would be falling apart.

Granted i dont mind the racing industry so much, but when you look at the big picture of age and injuries vs amount of training the animal is being put through its kind of obvious. there is no explanation to say that what the racing industry does to these young horses is good for them. theres a reason why horses in the h/j and eventing worlds are not jumped at young ages like this. its no different. they all grow pretty similar and no matter what breed, any amount of stress put on joints, bones, and soft tissue at this critical growing period int heir lives is not good for them.

I would respect M. Matz's opinion any day in regards to conformation. he knows a great horse when he sees one.

On the Farm
Aug. 30, 2009, 07:21 PM
and you can flame me for this one too:

I dont care what racing folks say about it. No matter how good the horse is put together, racing and training from under 2 years and around that general age is not good for a young animal, at all. they are still growing, nothing has fused yet, and they still have 4 more years of growing left to do. its really, honestly, no surprise that its very difficult to try and find a clean horse off the track. there is always something wrong, its just a matter of finding it. we have 3 year olds on the racing circuit with many bone chips in their legs, splints, tendon and suspensory issues, etc. maybe if they wern't hammered on at such a young age, none of them would be falling apart.

Granted i dont mind the racing industry so much, but when you look at the big picture of age and injuries vs amount of training the animal is being put through its kind of obvious. there is no explanation to say that what the racing industry does to these young horses is good for them. theres a reason why horses in the h/j and eventing worlds are not jumped at young ages like this. its no different. they all grow pretty similar and no matter what breed, any amount of stress put on joints, bones, and soft tissue at this critical growing period int heir lives is not good for them.

I would respect M. Matz's opinion any day in regards to conformation. he knows a great horse when he sees one.

Again, and for the friggin' umpteenth time that I and others have stated here, the SCIENTIFIC evidence shows that training horses at a young age actually conditions their bones to withstand the rigors of racing. Tell you what, take one your full grown, never stressed until they were fully "developed" jumpers and put them into race training. I'd be interested to see the result (and I'm betting that it wouldn't be good.)