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horselover61
Aug. 26, 2009, 01:05 AM
Figured this board would know best. Just got a tb gelding that has a green osselet. Just popped within the last two weeks (so they say). What can I do, besides Surpass, that will help stop it. Horse is being just lightly jogged every few days with daily turnout now. Being bandaged while stabled overnight & painted with a DMSO/Cortisone mix.

LKF
Aug. 26, 2009, 07:20 AM
I had this article- good info:

Treatment Options

The good news is that osselets don’t have to be a permanently crippling development. In many cases -- if treated promptly -- osselets resolve to the point that the horse can resume normal work, even racing (although the horse might wear the "jewelry" of an enlarged ankle as a result of the trauma).

When a horse first shows signs of soreness and inflammation in his fetlocks, his work schedule should be curtailed, and he should be started on cold therapy (cold hosing and/or ice packs applied to the ankle several times a day) for about 48 hours. Usually, this will take care of the acute irritation. By the third day, most horses will benefit more from the application of warm, moist heat (warm compresses, warm-water hosing, or whirlpool boots), alternating with applications of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) or capsaicin, on the advice of your veterinarian. If a strict routine of stall rest and heat therapy is followed for about four to six weeks, the horse has a very good chance of a complete recovery and return to work. In essence, you’ve stopped in its tracks the worst of the inflammatory process that leads to chronic arthritis.

If, however, your horse’s fetlocks don’t respond to this regime, or if it took you some time to realize his problem before you began treatment, further measures might be necessary.

In decades past, caustic leg paints or blisters often were employed to trigger a "counter-irritant" effect, which was said to increase circulation to the affected area and speed healing. Most veterinarians now feel this approach potentially can cause far more harm than good. The same can be said for the ancient (and some call cruel) practice of pin-firing.

More recently, osselets have been treated with the injection of cortisone into the joint. While this usually has a very good pain-relieving effect, allowing the horse to return to work sooner, steroids (like cortisone) can sometimes trigger further cartilage damage down the road (particularly when used on a continuing basis). A better option for many horses is the injection of polysulfated glycosaminoglycans (PSGAGs) -- brand name Adequan -- or sodium hyaluronate, either intra-articularly or systemically. Both have the effect of reducing inflammation within the joint capsule, and they can help repair damaged cartilage if administered early in the inflammatory cycle.

Although stall rest is indicated when osselets are "green," careful exercise is a good idea once the acute inflammation is past. Some veterinarians recommend swimming as rehabilitative exercise; it has the advantage of toning the muscles and challenging the cardiovascular system while putting no pressure on stressed leg joints.

Osselets often respond to treatment if they’re discovered early and dealt with diligently, but the prognosis is considerably poorer once bony changes begin to accumulate within the fetlock joints and encroach on the articular surfaces. Much depends on exactly where the new bone growth shows up (something which is best assessed by X ray). Ulceration of the joint cartilage, which can occur in advanced cases, is tough to reverse since cartilage heals very slowly and imperfectly. The prognosis with that sort of damage is for chronic, recurring lameness, and almost certainly a reduction in the level of athletic performance.

Osselets that have resolved can recur, especially in horses used for high-performance sports such as racing or three-day eventing, unless some of the causative conditions are eliminated. One of the biggest differences you can make is to assess your horse’s shoeing. If his hooves are unbalanced or strike the ground unevenly, they can create stress for all of the joints above them, including the fetlock. Therapeutic shoeing can help reduce the amount of torque on the joints and minimize the chance of problems resurfacing. You also might want to consider using special shock-absorbing pads or shoes.

If your horse has upright conformation that contributes to his ankle problems, he’ll likely be prone to aggravating his osselets all of his life. It’s possible a change of career to something low-key and low-impact will help keep him sounder, longer.

DickHertz
Aug. 26, 2009, 09:56 AM
They have to run their course regardless of what you're going to do with them right now (so I wouldn't fret about doing all the work you are currently doing). I would give the horse 4-6 months off in a field and hit them with adequan 2x per month. For the first month I would keep the horse on a mix of stall rest and limited turnout in a small area. Depending on your budget, I would consider putting Hylartin with a pinch of cortizone in there right now. Seems to work well for me.

Florida Fan
Aug. 31, 2009, 12:01 PM
They have to run their course regardless of what you're going to do with them right now (so I wouldn't fret about doing all the work you are currently doing). I would give the horse 4-6 months off in a field and hit them with adequan 2x per month. For the first month I would keep the horse on a mix of stall rest and limited turnout in a small area. Depending on your budget, I would consider putting Hylartin with a pinch of cortizone in there right now. Seems to work well for me.

Ditto, Dick. Most "old timers" know this is just the way it is!