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Ellie&Werther
Aug. 25, 2009, 12:07 AM
I went to a show this weekend, one of our friends truck had a flat tire so we trailered her Lusitano stallion home. The trailer was a four horse head to head, we had two mares in the trailer and my gelding. We put himself next to my gelding and across from the mares. We didn't had a stud gate or anything, he was so good and was a perfect gentleman the whole way back. He is a great little horse in the show ring as well, the trainer who rides him does a excellent job. I'm not looking for a horse anytime soon but I would like to hear more about temperament and ridabilty, particularly as a para rider I am always on the lookout for horses with really good brains. Also, is there prejudice against them in the ring say versus a Hanoverian or a Dutch Warmblood because of their more classical build?

Ambrey
Aug. 25, 2009, 12:25 AM
A friend at my barn has a Lusi stud who is just the most well behaved boy. And drop dead gorgeous to boot ;)

atr
Aug. 25, 2009, 12:31 AM
I occasionally ride a Lusitano stallion. Total gentleman, very correct, and a joy to ride.

pintopiaffe
Aug. 25, 2009, 01:42 AM
It's quite 'traditional' to leave them intact unless there's a reason not to. Which means there is a lot of breeding for temperament and for being able to be left intact. Some are more studdy, some are more mouthy, but as a *rule* they seem to be able to contain themselves admirably. ;)

I am a huge fan, I ride them at my teacher's. Of course, I ride a stallion too, who also can be trailered with mares, turned out with geldings/his colt son etc. I'm spoilt rotten. ;)

One of the things my hip and back appreciate is almost every one I've ever been on has a back like butter. Brings it's own woes when it comes to getting them truly through--vs faking it and looking pretty, like many baroque builds/types--but has led me to start an IberianX branch of my program.

If you like a smaller package, look at Colonial Spanish horses. Same gaits and traits, just downsized a bit.

Shiaway
Aug. 25, 2009, 02:34 AM
Wonderful horses. I think many, not all, have great temperaments. Some can be hot. Maybe too hot for some but others are very quiet. They are breeding them more sporty now in Brazil. But I'm sure you can also find the older style. Some bloodlines are more like spanish QHs. But some are more dressage oriented.

It depends on your goals. There are lusitanos that can be competitive in the top levels. There are currently. But I think that if you want to compete at the top levels on a more international scale the odds of finding a suitable horse would be more in your favor if you went with a WB.

But if you want a horse that will be a good teacher and take pretty good care of you, I'd recommend a lusitano. My trainer describes my horse as a "true lady's horse". I'm not sure if this is a good thing LOL

If I were in the position to buy another horse (read lusitano, cause I'm addicted) I would either find a private seller in the states or I would go to Brazil personally. I would not buy from a middle man. And if you insist on buy from a middle man and you're in the new england area, PM me because there are some who have a better eye for horses and some who do not IMO.

Petstorejunkie
Aug. 25, 2009, 01:50 PM
Lippizzans are the soldiers, Andalusians the pre-Madonnas, and Lusitanos are the happy go lucky goobers.
i see alot of similarities between these three breeds, but the above is my easiest analogy for their temperament.

EiRide
Aug. 25, 2009, 03:12 PM
I rode for a week in Portugal on a lovely Lusitano mare--the whole group were mounted on them, and all were really nice, rideable horses with plenty of go and a nice whoa. I am sure there is plenty of variation within the breed, but the ones I worked with were all really nice horses.

Elegante E
Aug. 25, 2009, 03:27 PM
There are hotter and colder bloodlines so it really depends on that - just like any breed. If you want a smoother ride, be sure the pasterns are longer and well sloped. The short backs can make sitting the trot a bit hard until the horse is really through and more collected (can feel like you're on top of that strong hind end).

Be warned that Lusitanos are still pretty rare in the US so you will spend a premium on a good one. Consider a PSP (pure spanish portuguese) as they are much less expensive and just as nice (just means they aren't papered pure spanish or pure portuguese as they have some of both).

dutchmike
Aug. 25, 2009, 04:13 PM
The Lusitano is a noble horse. The horse of kings. :D

Hampton Bay
Aug. 25, 2009, 04:15 PM
I love them! The ones I have ridden are easy to sit, but I'm sure not all of them are like that. And there are very quiet ones, but there are also very hot ones. So certainly pay attention to that.

They are quite pricey though because of the limited supply in this country. Many of the half or 3/4 Luso's are still very nice though, if you are on a budget. I have a half-Luso filly out of a nice appendix mare, and she really looks purebred, but her back is a bit longer than they tend to be. I think that's the only thing she took from her dam!

smithereens_86
Aug. 26, 2009, 12:02 PM
They are quite pricey though because of the limited supply in this country.

Tell me about it!! I fell in love with the temperament of the Iberians when I took some lessons on some schoolmasters during my downtime while horse shopping after selling my horse. I ended up refocusing my horse search to just the Iberian breeds. I really wanted a Lusitano, but I couldn't find one that suited my needs. I eventually found a really nice Andalusian/TB with lovely movement and a fantastic temperament. The Iberians are harder to come by in this country, but well worth the effort.

~Shelly~

ESG
Aug. 26, 2009, 05:37 PM
They're not that expensive, especially compared to the European warmbloods. Just do a search on Dreamhorse or Equine.com and compare the prices of similarly trained, similar aged horses. You'll probably be pleasantly surprised. :yes:

And yes, Andalusians and Lusitanos are the best. Only thing that surprises me is that it's taken American riders so long to catch onto that. Not that it bothers me, mind you - more for me, when I go looking again! :D

nmazteca
Aug. 26, 2009, 07:00 PM
I have an Andalusian/QH cross.(Aka Azteca) He has a wonderful mind, is a willing partner and is very easy on my old back. I take dressage lessons and we are bringing each other along nicely. Not sure what the comment about Andy's being prima donna's meant.

Lusoluv
Aug. 26, 2009, 07:22 PM
After riding my trainer's Luso stallions, I couldn't get them off my mind. I've started/trained a TB, WB and PRE. After saving and saving, I finally got an imported Lusitano 2 years ago. He's everything I had hoped for, all business undersaddle, but no dead-head, that's for sure! I'd say about 10% of the breed could be called hot. My trainer has a young para-rider who lessons on his GP stallion. If you can afford one, you'll never go back :)

whicker
Aug. 26, 2009, 07:54 PM
Isn't Kyra Kyrklund competing one? There was a thread about it. check the archives, it was very interesting.

FillyMe
Aug. 26, 2009, 08:18 PM
When I was interested in the Lusos I had an opportunity to ride a couple, one of which was a stallion. I had never been on a stallion before so I was a bit intimidated, plus he was 16'3, bigger than what I was used to. Anyway, it sealed the deal for me and I was on a mission. I now have owned my amazing and beautiful Lusitano for about 2 1/2 years and he is so great. He has very comfortable gaits and is forward thinking, which is what I was looking for after 8 years with a lazy DWB. So, if you are not looking for one right now, just check out some of the classified web sites and see what is out there snd the current prices and continue to research. My guy was originally bred in Brazil as a lot of them are and is from an international GP sire, so there is good breeding coming from there. Also, for fun, if you can plan it, in February of next year the Lusitano Collection is coming back to Wellington, Fl where you can view, ride and bid on the ones they bring in from the Interagro Lusitanos from Brazil. I truly feel even as a para-equestrian they are a good breed choice. As far as competitiveness, I have seen over the years lots of Luso's and Andalusians scoring very well in probably the most competitive show rings anywhere in the US, especially in the FEI levels where they tend to excel.

Ellie&Werther
Aug. 26, 2009, 09:58 PM
When I was interested in the Lusos I had an opportunity to ride a couple, one of which was a stallion. I had never been on a stallion before so I was a bit intimidated, plus he was 16'3, bigger than what I was used to. Anyway, it sealed the deal for me and I was on a mission. I now have owned my amazing and beautiful Lusitano for about 2 1/2 years and he is so great. He has very comfortable gaits and is forward thinking, which is what I was looking for after 8 years with a lazy DWB. So, if you are not looking for one right now, just check out some of the classified web sites and see what is out there snd the current prices and continue to research. My guy was originally bred in Brazil as a lot of them are and is from an international GP sire, so there is good breeding coming from there. Also, for fun, if you can plan it, in February of next year the Lusitano Collection is coming back to Wellington, Fl where you can view, ride and bid on the ones they bring in from the Interagro Lusitanos from Brazil. I truly feel even as a para-equestrian they are a good breed choice. As far as competitiveness, I have seen over the years lots of Luso's and Andalusians scoring very well in probably the most competitive show rings anywhere in the US, especially in the FEI levels where they tend to excel.

The stallion that rode home with us was Vadico Interagro, the other Interagro stallion this trainer has is Sargon.

smithereens_86
Aug. 27, 2009, 09:10 AM
They're not that expensive, especially compared to the European warmbloods. Just do a search on Dreamhorse or Equine.com and compare the prices of similarly trained, similar aged horses. You'll probably be pleasantly surprised. :yes:

And yes, Andalusians and Lusitanos are the best. Only thing that surprises me is that it's taken American riders so long to catch onto that. Not that it bothers me, mind you - more for me, when I go looking again! :D

Trust me, I just spent 8 months horse shopping for an Iberian, so I am VERY WELL AWARE of what is and isn't available in the market right now. I've done more searches on Dreamhorse and Equine.com than I care to admit to. If you pop in Lusitano and limit it to "for sale only" to try to weed out some of the "stud" ads, you will get about 60 hits nationwide. That's it. You still need to weed out the quality from the crap, and weed out the stud ads that Dreamhorse still picked up, and what you will find is that you only have a VERY SMALL handful of quality horses left to even begin to consider. Your options are extremely limited. Whereas if you put in any of the warmblood breeds and run the same search, you will get a plethora of hits that you will need to weed through in the same fashion with many more resulting potential candidates to choose from in the end. Shopping for a Lusitano in this country is much more difficult than shopping for a WB. The Lusitanos tend to be sold more frequently by private breeders so your search needs to be more "creative" rather than limited to just the regular horse sale sites. The horses are there, and their prices are comparable to a quality warmblood. Just make sure that the Lusitano you purchase is worth its pricetag as not every Lusi has the gaits/temperament to justify the cost - most yes, but not all.

~Shelly~

ania
Aug. 27, 2009, 09:24 AM
i got to piaffe on one! he was great. wonderful horse, a stallion but you couldn't tell. another one that i handled was a bit hotter in that respect but apparently a great ride. i've heard that they're becoming popular because they're a lot easier to sit and know a woman (AA, middle-aged) who has one and really enjoys hers.