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View Full Version : Earning money to go to the NAJYRC?



OlympicDreams
Aug. 17, 2009, 02:56 PM
Hi there!

I hope everyone is having a wonderful day! :) I just wanted to post a question that people might be able to answer or help me with. I am a FEI Junior rider and I am turning 17 this year. I am hoping to try out for the Canadian Junior team this year on a horse I am going to lease. I tried out last year on a different horse that I leased but unfortunately we just missed it by a little. As everyone knows it is an expensive sport to be in. I know my parents work very hard to allow me to have these wonderful experiences! I am truly blessed to be doing what I am doing. However, I would love to support my hobby as much as possible (ex: paying for shows, lessons etc.) so I can take some of the stress away from my parents. I would love to take on a part time job but being in private school in grade 12, I need to focus on my homework and after thats done riding. I was wondering if anyone had any ideas on how to earn money on the side? Like I don't know... selling cookies, weeding... things like that? I am open to ANY suggestions :). I will do absolutely ANYTHING to go to the NAJYRC! :D

Thank you so much for all your help! I really appreciate it! Have a fantastic day!


Happy Riding!

YankeeLawyer
Aug. 17, 2009, 03:23 PM
What about teaching riding lessons to younger students? Or perhaps accompanying them to horse shows and keeping an eye on them for their parents? When I was a junior, once I got my driver's license I used to drive 1-2 kids to the away shows; I was competing anyway and it was a good way to earn a little pocket money. I also made and sold birthday cakes for little kids' parties (but I am really good at decorating cakes), and had all kinds of retail jobs at one time or another. I would not recommend taking on something that requires a time commitment such that it would interfere with your schoolwork as the most important thing for you right now is that you do well in school so that you have many opportunities in your future (but I sense from your post that you are already aware of that). If you can manage it, waiting tables on the weekends - maybe one night a week - might work.

Another thought - if there are any small private farms in your area, you might be able to get a simple job like feeding and turnout several mornings a week before school, or horse / pet sitting while people are on vacation.

cyndi
Aug. 17, 2009, 03:33 PM
Pet sitting is a great idea and pays well. Another idea is to offer a tack cleaning service - pick it up, take it home and clean it, and deliver back. Or clean onsite.

Last week I saw a flier in the feed store that an enterprising young girl had made - offering horse 'salon' services -- shampoo, condition tail, pul mane, clip whiskers etc. she offered several 'packages' -- I thought it was a great idea!

Along that vein, how about a horse trailer detailing service? Clean out interior, wash outside, etc. You might get multiple people signed up at barns to make the most of your time!

Good luck!

YankeeLawyer
Aug. 17, 2009, 03:37 PM
Last week I saw a flier in the feed store that an enterprising young girl had made - offering horse 'salon' services -- shampoo, condition tail, pul mane, clip whiskers etc. she offered several 'packages' -- I thought it was a great idea!

Along that vein, how about a horse trailer detailing service? Clean out interior, wash outside, etc. You might get multiple people signed up at barns to make the most of your time!

Good luck!

Those are great ideas! I would love a salon day for my guys. Also, you can earn some decent pocket money braiding if you are good at it.

ania
Aug. 17, 2009, 03:46 PM
in addition to tack cleaning, may i suggest boot polishing? and maybe odd jobs in your neighborhood, or for people at the barn. it could include dog walking (along the lines of pet sitting), or mowing lawns, etc. it might work to just go up and ask if they need anything done and suggest a few things that you could do and ask if they had anything else. i agree with yankeelawyer in not taking something that takes a time commitment that interferes with your schoolwork.

Commander Cody
Aug. 18, 2009, 12:20 PM
In Region 1 (East Coast US) our kids for this year's NAJYRC teams did a variety of fundraising activities. They had a lot of success with tack cleaning and boot polishing AT SHOWS where you have access to a large number of people. Make your prices reasonable, do a good job and perhaps you will have repeat business. Also, let them know why you are doing the work and you may find some good hearted donors give you a bit extra. Maybe you can talk a few friends into helping you out. They also did a bake sale at a show, with much of the food donated by friends and family (it's easier to talk people into a small donation like that than actual $ sometimes).
Also, we worked with some of the local dressage organizations to do both raffles of donated items and a 50/50 cash raffle. I don't know if you have a local group you could work with to come up with some ideas.
Does the Canadian Dressage organization offer support for its Junior and Young Rider teams? Perhaps you should investigate any programs or grants they might have.
Good luck! If you start now, you should have plenty of time.

CapitolDesign
Aug. 18, 2009, 06:59 PM
We have made quite a bit selling Avon and Mark (http://www.youravon.com/hmoore0910)to friends/family. You make up to 50% commission and it only costs $10 to start.

In the first 2 weeks of our fundraiser, we already sold $300+ in products and made over $100. This only took a day each week, to email everyone we knew, and just encouraging everyone at your farm/school to buy (and you are already there, talking with many people).

You can also have friends help you sell and you still make a percentage of the commission!

PM me or visit www.youravon.com/hmoore0910 (http://www.youravon.com/hmoore0910) to see what the fundraising is all about!

saxony
Aug. 18, 2009, 08:17 PM
The juniors in our area (region 8) have organized stall cleaning commitees at our shows. They strip your stall and they keep your deposit. I thought that was a great idea.

YankeeLawyer
Aug. 18, 2009, 10:02 PM
We have made quite a bit selling Avon and Mark (http://www.youravon.com/hmoore0910)to friends/family. You make up to 50% commission and it only costs $10 to start.

In the first 2 weeks of our fundraiser, we already sold $300+ in products and made over $100. This only took a day each week, to email everyone we knew, and just encouraging everyone at your farm/school to buy (and you are already there, talking with many people).

You can also have friends help you sell and you still make a percentage of the commission!

PM me or visit www.youravon.com/hmoore0910 (http://www.youravon.com/hmoore0910) to see what the fundraising is all about!

I would not count on schools allowing that. I know that neither my school nor any my 4 siblings attended allow sales or solicitations by students on school grounds.

rivenoak
Aug. 18, 2009, 10:33 PM
Not just pet-sitting, but house or farm sitting!

I made a lot of $ this way...especially with people who had a home on the market or a ranch with livestock. I did live-in situations, so there is someone there at night, odd times during the day, etc. It went well beyond just taking in the mail everyday.

One of the best gigs I had was at friends' house that had an indoor pool and jacuzzi. It was winter & I could look out the windows of that room at the snow, while being all cozy in the jacuzzi. I got great compliments after that job, because I had deadheaded the plants inside the house & kept everything looking REALLY good. They said it was in better shape than when they left.

Maybe some of your parents' friends who know you would be willing to hire you while they go away for a weekend or a week. Then you could build some good references.

And yes, I even did this in high school.