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mickeydoodle
Aug. 11, 2009, 02:27 PM
When I was in High School quite a few years ago, my first dressage horse was a wonderful 14.2h quarter horse, bred in Michigan. He was of the "Poco" bloodlines. He was a lighter type, not very muscle bound, and just wonderful to train.

I have a friend looking for a similar type of "hony" for dressage. Does anyone know if these bloodlines are still being used and where we might find such a horse?

Bluey
Aug. 11, 2009, 02:40 PM
Poco Bueno was an old very accomplished cowhorse stallion, his gaits were not the best and he tended to pass them on, short and choppy, if very athletic anyway.

I think that the horse you remember must have received his good gaits from some other in his breeding.;)

This was a good looking granddaughter of Poco Bueno thru Poco Dell that had lovely gaits, but she didn't get them from the postlegged, short and squatty Poco Buenos:

http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a298/Robintoo/Scan163August112009.jpg?t=1250017120

Here is a grandson of Poco Bueno that looks like him, the old type, bulldog quarter horse.
He also was the roughest trotting horse you ever tried to sit on, like a short, rapid cilinder hitting hard:

http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a298/Robintoo/Scan021August252006.jpg?t=1250017283

Both of these horses were very good ranch horses and had many of the good Poco Bueno features they were known for.:)

mickeydoodle
Aug. 11, 2009, 02:50 PM
you are right, now that I "googled" Poco. Poco Bueno looked nothing like my horse. Sorry for the post, I knew nothing about "foundation" breeding. I was really lucky with my little horse, when I went to college, he stayed on as a "schoolmaster" at the lower levels, with Violet Hopkins and her students to teach on.

So does anyone know a lighter type, smaller QH or cross for sale, suitable for dressage, safe, need not be a world beater.

LJStarkey
Aug. 11, 2009, 02:51 PM
If you're interested in those older, more "Baroque"-style QH bloodlines, you might look for a Hancock-bred horse. Here's a link where you can learn more about them.

http://www.hancockhorses.com/articles.html

mickeydoodle
Aug. 11, 2009, 02:53 PM
If you're interested in those older, more "Baroque"-style QH bloodlines, you might look for a Hancock-bred horse. Here's a link where you can learn more about them.

http://www.hancockhorses.com/articles.html


No, want a smaller, lighter horse. I did not realize that my little horse was not typical of the line.

Bluey
Aug. 11, 2009, 03:10 PM
Quarter horses are known as "the versatile" breed.
That means there are all types of them and you get to pick what type you like to ride for what you want to do.:)

I would look for the other qualities you want in a horse more than for specific bloodlines.

You want small?
Most cutting, reining and working cowhorse lines tend to be small, ranch horse and roping lines taller.:yes:
I would just look for the type horse you need regardless of the lines, since you are not going to compete in breed shows or need one bred for a certain discipline.

sheltona01
Aug. 11, 2009, 04:14 PM
Growing up my younger sister had a horse from the Poco line. I do not know how he would have done in dressage, but he has awesome. We rode western and that little horse would try his heart out for his rider. Everyone else who has had horses from that line always made similar comments.

atlatl
Aug. 11, 2009, 04:23 PM
If you want a smaller quarter horse with nice gaits, look at the pleasure bloodlines or even better some good Western Riding horses (aka lead changing machines). All-arounders will likely be too tall. Some considerations; Zippo Pine Bar, Blazing Hot, Rugged Lark, etc. but now I'm dating myself.

Know in advance however, that quarter horses typically have a very low neck set and most will travel either downhill (bad) or if nicely put together and properly trained will go level. Very few will travel uphill. This isn't the desired conformation for dressage so some expectations management is in order.

xQHDQ
Aug. 11, 2009, 04:33 PM
I'm not up on all of the modern bloodlines but from current/past experience:

Look for Boston Mac bloodlines if you want small and good mover and a great mind.

Investment Asset throws very sweet babies (not the brightest bulbs on the tree) and because they are Western show bred, they are usually on the small side and very light.

Big and good mover is easier because they usually have a lot of TB blood.
Bett Ohio (a TB but throws great minds)
Skys Blue Boy (don't know about disposition)
Ruggard Lark (great minds)

Sonny Go Lucky/Sonny Dee Bar horses are very athletic but a little stubborn.

Impressive bloodlines tend to like to rear and often have that HYPP problem.

Good luck. I love my QH (Irresistible Bett x Hemps Speedy Girl)

thatmoody
Aug. 11, 2009, 04:55 PM
All of the Rugged Lark horses I've known have been very athletic and good movers - but then you have to factor in the rest of the bloodlines. I had a really awesome mare who would have been good for dressage - she was a really good working cow horse, too, but she was so balanced and light. She could go all day and was very uphill and a beautiful overstriding mover. She has also stayed sound o' these many years - she's still toting beginners around the barrel circuit and I see her from time to time (she's in her mid-20's now, but I broke and trained her and had her till she was 9). She has a great forever home and I'm very proud of the part I played in her upbringing. She was Rugged Lark on the topside but Go Dick Go (a Florida bred racing QH) on the mare line.

KBEquine
Aug. 11, 2009, 05:40 PM
No, want a smaller, lighter horse. I did not realize that my little horse was not typical of the line.

I think I know what you mean - our old foundation-bred QH stallion was "hony-sized" maybe 15.1 & because he was NOT the modern muscle-bound type, folks often wondered if he were maybe a Morgan or an Arab cross . . . but he didn't look like that, either.

He stayed with a friend who was a dressage trainer & the first time she saw him, she shook her head and said, "I think he's the most correct mover I've ever seen!"

Last year we sold one of his sons - a TB cross, who is bigger (maybe 15.3) than his sire. His new owner was working with him when a friend who is a confirmed warmblood-owning dressage rider showed up, took one look & said simply, "I'm jealous."

(And we've got 2 of them left at home.)

As a plus, they all work cattle & the ones we've trail ridden have been pretty happy doing it, if you want to get out of the dressage ring and "play" somewhere else.

By the way, the stallion's sire was from the Virginia/Tennessee area (we're not - we're farther north) & named "King's Destiny." If you by chance see the name in a pedigree, well, it's a place to start. (The stallion's dam was a Waggoner ranch mare by a cutting stallion named War Leo, if you are looking at pedigrees).

Edited to add pictures:

http://i214.photobucket.com/albums/cc307/KBEquine/0107billandbosshalt.jpg

http://i214.photobucket.com/albums/cc307/KBEquine/0107billandbosscanter.jpg

http://i214.photobucket.com/albums/cc307/KBEquine/0107billandbossprance.jpg

Bluey
Aug. 11, 2009, 05:43 PM
I'm not up on all of the modern bloodlines but from current/past experience:

Look for Boston Mac bloodlines if you want small and good mover and a great mind.

Investment Asset throws very sweet babies (not the brightest bulbs on the tree) and because they are Western show bred, they are usually on the small side and very light.

Big and good mover is easier because they usually have a lot of TB blood.
Bett Ohio (a TB but throws great minds)
Skys Blue Boy (don't know about disposition)
Ruggard Lark (great minds)

Sonny Go Lucky/Sonny Dee Bar horses are very athletic but a little stubborn.

Impressive bloodlines tend to like to rear and often have that HYPP problem.

Good luck. I love my QH (Irresistible Bett x Hemps Speedy Girl)

Some of that I agree with, except with Boston Mac, according to the several that have come thru our hands and what we have heard over the years.
Horses that his breeding comes thru generally tend to be hard to keep sound, are more the nervous kind and have tendency to have skin allergies.

Even with all that, some are very good performers and people will put up with any drawbacks to them because of that.

We used to train some Go Dick Go sons and they were very good as race and ranch horses.
Maybe not top race horses, but they sure would consistently bring a check home if you entered them in the right races for them.:)
We trained, raced and kept one of his sons as a stallion for several years, but the bloodlines were not that popular, so we finally gelded him at ten.
Since he was a good ranch horse also, he adjusted well to being a gelding.

merrygoround
Aug. 11, 2009, 06:07 PM
I too would look at the horse, not the blood lines. If you get bogged down in blood lines, you may miss the very horse you want.

I remember riding a lovely mare by Forecast many years ago. Don't even remember her dam.
Unfortunately he didn't seem to imprint his foals, and a lot of them followed their dams.

BTW I would not use the word "baroque" in conjunction with Poco Bueno. ;) :lol:

birdsong
Aug. 11, 2009, 06:25 PM
QH are great in my book. My own is of racing bloodlines..which means is very heavy TB on sire side.

http://www.allbreedpedigree.com/shades+of+black+gold

Everyone always asked what his breeding is. He would have made a very nice English styled mount.

We had Poco Imprint as a child....very bulldoggish! He would sit..and when he did he looked like an elephant!

tempichange
Aug. 11, 2009, 07:16 PM
When I was in High School quite a few years ago, my first dressage horse was a wonderful 14.2h quarter horse, bred in Michigan. He was of the "Poco" bloodlines. He was a lighter type, not very muscle bound, and just wonderful to train.

I have a friend looking for a similar type of "hony" for dressage. Does anyone know if these bloodlines are still being used and where we might find such a horse?

Lisa, you might want to take a look at the reining horses. They tend to run towards "hony" range, use some Poco lines and come with a number of pre-installed stuff. I remember when I slapped a dressage saddle on one and did an entire 4-1 with him, including tempi's. Probably not the cleanest half pass in the world, but he tried his heart out and the breaks where still definitely there.

meupatdoes
Aug. 11, 2009, 07:38 PM
If you want a smaller quarter horse with nice gaits, look at the pleasure bloodlines or even better some good Western Riding horses (aka lead changing machines). All-arounders will likely be too tall. Some considerations; Zippo Pine Bar, Blazing Hot, Rugged Lark, etc. but now I'm dating myself.

Know in advance however, that quarter horses typically have a very low neck set and most will travel either downhill (bad) or if nicely put together and properly trained will go level. Very few will travel uphill. This isn't the desired conformation for dressage so some expectations management is in order.

My little dressage QH (http://i579.photobucket.com/albums/ss235/meupatdoes2/Horses/Jinxy/Jinxyhandsome.jpg) is a son of Blazing Hot and he is absolutely adorable.
He is a cute little mover too.

He has turned me into a great big fan of the QH breed so I 100% second atlatl's recommendation!

ottb dressage
Aug. 11, 2009, 07:49 PM
hi

i have a little quarter horse fellow for a dressage mount. he and my off the track tb just helped me achieve my usdf rider's performance award at training level : ) i think if you look to the more tb influenced lines in a qh you will be happy. my little boy is a grandson on the sire side of the great three bars, a racing tb, and mare line bred to impressive. he is not hypp and does not have any rearing issues. impressive was quite a bit tb. my boy is about 15.3 and very solidly built yet refined. perhaps check out the aqha website to see if their are any breeders in your area that have qh for sale that suit your friends needs.

paintjumper
Aug. 11, 2009, 07:50 PM
You should be proud, he is beautiful.

nuts4cowboybutts
Aug. 11, 2009, 08:03 PM
This thread takes me back - way back.

We were all in awe of Poco Bueno and his cow sense. We got a Poco Bueno grandson, and he did not have a bone jarring gait. We loved those bloodlines. I can remember drooling over the mare, Poco Lena, who was some kind of cutting horse! She produced, too. I remember I sobbed when they had to put her down.

Now we hear that HERDA is supposed to come down from the sire line of Poco Bueno. I guess we didn't know any better back then.

And also way back were the King Ranch Quarter Horses. Mr. Kleberg was keen on genetics and great record keeping. I was so pleased to have a couple of Hired Hand bred geldings that I showed. Talk about easy moving horses! Hired Hand was a prepotent son of Old Sorrel who was at the foundation of the King Ranch breeding program. Hired Hand was used to "set type" and was closely line bred to some Old Sorrel progeny. Mr. Kleberg was closely observant in his line breeding and did not want the mares he produced to have masculine characteristics. When that happened he brought in mares to outcross. I had a lot of respect for Mr. Kleberg.

Thanks for taking me back to the olden days...

thatmoody
Aug. 11, 2009, 09:15 PM
I used to work for Deseret Ranches, and we had some of those King ranch mares - my mare was out of their stock. Lots of Poco Bueno, but we never had a HERDA horse, thank goodness. I was heavy into breeding and training stock horses through their program (they had an employee incentive program where you would take 2 year olds and break them, and if you trained them for 6 months they were yours to resell) and we had some really good horses come out of there. Not your heavy pleasure type QH that you see today, but light, responsive horses that had a lot of sense. That's where my mare came from - as a 2 year old she'd never been handled but she was very easy to work with and sensible.

Bluey
Aug. 11, 2009, 09:19 PM
This horse of ours went back to Hired Hand five times, came from a neighbor to the King Ranch, that bred to their stallions:

http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a298/Robintoo/Scan010June112006-1.jpg?t=1250039479

I liked these lines better than the Poco Buenos for all around good horses and very good minded ones, but I have to say that we had a more athletic horse with the Poco Buenos.
Pine Johnson and Don Dodge agreed with that and so did many judges, that made the shows of the time interesting between the slightly different types of the King Ranch and Waggoner horses.;)

I would guess that most horses of those breedings would not be what I would think is competitive in any kind of English events at other than very low levels.
Many just didn't have the gaits for it.

Now, many quarter horses going back to Three Bar TB did move considerably better for that, although I have right now one that his dam is a granddaughter of Three Bars himself and he is more like the rest of his breeding, his sire being a grandson of Doc Olena and Peponita.

We may try for some traits, but in breeding, nothing is a given, you get whatever you get.:yes:

Bluey
Aug. 11, 2009, 09:28 PM
I used to work for Deseret Ranches, and we had some of those King ranch mares - my mare was out of their stock. Lots of Poco Bueno, but we never had a HERDA horse, thank goodness. I was heavy into breeding and training stock horses through their program (they had an employee incentive program where you would take 2 year olds and break them, and if you trained them for 6 months they were yours to resell) and we had some really good horses come out of there. Not your heavy pleasure type QH that you see today, but light, responsive horses that had a lot of sense. That's where my mare came from - as a 2 year old she'd never been handled but she was very easy to work with and sensible.

I don't remember the King Ranch having many Poco Buenos for long time, as they were their competition.;)
Not until much later, crossed many times with others, they may have had some.

mickeydoodle
Aug. 11, 2009, 09:54 PM
Well, this was 30 years ago (hard to believe, it seems like yesterday) but my Poco was a great-grandson of PB. He was uphill, lightly built and so good in the mind. I bought him as a 4yr old, and tried him at the "horse dealers". The guy was a real horse trader, very shady, named Roman. I hauled out my English saddle and bridle (I was 15) put them on the pony and climbed aboard. It was definitely love at first ride. I did not know until later that he pony had never (NEVER) been ridden. Such a good mind he had. He is likely in large pony heaven now, after I went to college, he stayed at Violet Hopkins's farm as a school/lesson dressage horse. I still have the saddle I rode him in after all these years, too bad my butt doesn't fit in it any more.

Bluey
Aug. 11, 2009, 10:17 PM
Well, this was 30 years ago (hard to believe, it seems like yesterday) but my Poco was a great-grandson of PB. He was uphill, lightly built and so good in the mind. I bought him as a 4yr old, and tried him at the "horse dealers". The guy was a real horse trader, very shady, named Roman. I hauled out my English saddle and bridle (I was 15) put them on the pony and climbed aboard. It was definitely love at first ride. I did not know until later that he pony had never (NEVER) been ridden. Such a good mind he had. He is likely in large pony heaven now, after I went to college, he stayed at Violet Hopkins's farm as a school/lesson dressage horse. I still have the saddle I rode him in after all these years, too bad my butt doesn't fit in it any more.



Probably similar to the mare in the first picture I posted, that was a grandaughter of Poco Bueno, but didn't take after his lines after all and may have made a fair working hunter.
We still called her a Poco Bueno bred mare, but there was definitely more to her.
Sometimes, we forget to look at what else is there.:yes:

I did get to meet Violet Hopkins when we were showing in the Midwest circuit many, many years ago.
Neat that you rode under her.:)

mickeydoodle
Aug. 11, 2009, 10:33 PM
"Vi" (Violet Hopkins) was a great teacher. She taught anyone who wanted to learn dressage, even me on my 14.2 QH. I rode thru fields and road to her farm from where I boarded. In the winter she let me ride in her indoor for $10 per month, lessons were $15. Me and my Poco slogged over there every day that I could get out to the farm, thru snow, ice, etc. Michigan is yucky in the winter. I really learned a lot from her. She was very picky in the barn- tooth brushes were an integral part of cleaning tack, and heavy gloves and a bushel basket were used to pick up small bits of poop after the main stall cleaning was done.

The summer instructor sessions when people from across the country came to learn were invaluable. She was invariably firm, but fair. She would correct you firmly (she told a pony club friend of mine "you ride like you have hemmorhoids" ) but you always ended up in the most correctr position, with a supple horse.

She was gallant to the end of her life, even at over 90yrs she remembered that I had ridden with her, and had a nice thing to say.

atlatl
Aug. 11, 2009, 11:39 PM
Impressive bloodlines tend to like to rear and often have that HYPP problem.



I had an Impressive grandson. He never reared but boy that sucker could buck. Absolutely gorgeous to look at, an awesome pleasure horse and a real lead changing machine. I sold him to a gal in France; he was the high point quarter horse in Europe for a couple of years. HYPP negative.

City Ponies
Aug. 11, 2009, 11:55 PM
Look for a Zippo Pine Bar, or Sonny Dee bred crossed with a Ranch bred Doc Bar or Skipper W. Get the mind, legs, movement of the pleasure side with the athleticism and smarts of the cow side :)

thatmoody
Aug. 12, 2009, 07:22 AM
I'll have to search my memory (which is getting faultier as I'm getting older, I fear) - I may be getting my horses mixed up, and I'm NOT that good with bloodlines, so...! This was back in the mid 80's so a while ago - they had several studs, and about 30 broodmares, so quite a few different sets of genes but still some nice babies floating around Florida from that program. Their main focus was on their angus breeding program, of course - they weren't breeding for horses, but I do remember they had some nice foundation QH bloodlines. And of course when I sold these mares their papers went with them so I have no records. The only horse I do remember clearly was the one mare, because I had her so long. The other babies I sold within 6 months so they're all kind of a blur. I also remember the one mare because she had race breeding, which was unusual for their stock - still not sure how they got hold of HER.

It's funny - I still get to see her from time to time when I go to local barrel races, so at least I know she's still getting taken care of!

KBEquine
Aug. 12, 2009, 11:09 AM
I had an Impressive grandson. He never reared but boy that sucker could buck. Absolutely gorgeous to look at, an awesome pleasure horse and a real lead changing machine. I sold him to a gal in France; he was the high point quarter horse in Europe for a couple of years. HYPP negative.

Hating to over-generalize, but some Impressive horses are hard to get moving under saddle - they aren't so hard to saddle & back & even walk. But with some, "forward" often isn't part of their vocabulary, so it's when you think it's time for a strong trot or any ol' canter that they vote "No!"

see u at x
Aug. 12, 2009, 12:01 PM
We have some horses in our barn from the Zips Chocolate Chip line. They all have nice temperaments, are cute movers, and none of them are overly tall. I'd guess that they're all around 15-15.2 hands. There's also an Artful Move son who is a pretty mover as well, but he's awfully big - about 17h IIRC.

rabicon
Aug. 12, 2009, 12:04 PM
Mickey I sent you a pm.

Movin Artfully
Aug. 12, 2009, 07:33 PM
I have a grey 4yo 14.1h Colonel Freckles/Smokeys Gray/The Continental QH. I received great reviews at recent clinics with a Canadian Dressage Team rider and with a Senior rider of the Spanish Riding School. I bought Ace because I liked his walk/canter. He is an amazing athlete in a little package.

I've also got a black 3yo 16h Artful Investment/TB daughter. She's a beautiful big mover. Mentally very quiet. She has an awesome walk/canter and is just getting started under saddle. Tons of suspension at the trot.

Both horses are very athletic. Follow lines loosely, but buy for movement and a strong, level topline. They are hard to find, but are out there.

Poco Bueno is pretty old time...I'd look to the Bueno Chex line. Nu Chex to Cash is hot in reining right now. If you can find a small Artful Move/Investment- you can probably get it at a steal because they are looking for size in HUS.

mzm farm
Aug. 12, 2009, 09:34 PM
If you are not stuck on QH exclusively, take a look at:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CmC4_EcnWBY
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vfxI1edxJEc
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ndjysVTs6y4

Both are really fun to ride and can go as far as you'd like them to. The pony has done all the GP stuff - including piaffe, passage, one tempis. The paint is not under saddle yet, so is a clean slate.

Speedy Alice
Aug. 12, 2009, 10:11 PM
I agree with those who say that the Poco Bueno bloodline probably isn't the most amenable to dressage work...fabulous cow horse, though. :)

This thread brings back great memories - my first horse was a Poco Bueno granddaughter, your typical foundation-bred mare. She'd never been around a cow that I knew, yet she once turned on a dog that was annoying her (with me on her) and got very cat-like close to the ground and cut that dog back and forth until it left us alone. Sweetest girl in the world... I had her from age 6 until she was put to sleep at age 24.

Trivia - Poco Bueno was owned by friends of ours and as a mark of honor for him he was buried standing up. Here's a picture of his gravestone that my daughter took when she was visiting them:

http://www.dressageclinics.org/mypics/pocobuenograve.JPG

2Horse
Aug. 13, 2009, 09:39 AM
Nu Chex to Cash is hot in reining right now. .[/QUOTE]


Funny, The farm that has this stallion moved RIGHT across the road from my sister. Which is about 10 miles from me.
It is a pretty extensive facility. They just recently had a reining and cow horse clinic there.
I assume they moved there because of the KY incentive.

HenryisBlaisin'
Aug. 13, 2009, 09:54 AM
KBE-Your horse looks SO much like mine. He's unregistered, so I have no idea about his bloodlines. He was a ranch horse for many years, but that's all i really know about his history or breeding. Considering my boy's conformation (butt high, pretty big muscular quarters), he is surprisingly light. Dressage is totally new to him (as in about 2 months now new), but he's slowly starting to understand. We're going to our first Intro show on Saturday. We have a long way to go, and he'll probably never be more than a first level horse, but I love his QH mind and his personality.

nuts4cowboybutts
Aug. 13, 2009, 04:51 PM
Peptoboonsmall bred Quarter Horses are well liked around here. I know they really have cow sense and are very agile and responsive.

Anyone know of any of his breeding used in other disciplines? He is a super kind of horse.

silver pine
Aug. 13, 2009, 08:25 PM
Another vote for Zippo Pine Bar. My quarter horse, Silver Pine Scout, is a gem. We event up to training level and are working our way through First level.
http://www.facebook.com/home.php?#/photo.php?pid=4946&id=1699815026

Bluesy
Aug. 13, 2009, 10:44 PM
Just a warning on Poco Bueno,

There is a hereditary disease called HERDA that traces back to Poco Bueno,
http://www.angelfire.com/pa5/ment2befarms/herda.html (http://www.bringinglighttohypp.org/HERDA.html)
Doesn't mean that every horse by Poco Bueno has the disease, but it is good to be aware of it.

My hot (!) QH http://www.allbreedpedigree.com/jets+war+fire is quite uphill, though his stride is too short for dressage, really.

http://pets.webshots.com/photo/1067982241044994600ywLFcP
(showmanship picture - I've done a lot with him though - western pleasure/eq, english pleasure/eq, hunters, cow work etc.)

Cinnybren
Aug. 14, 2009, 10:56 AM
I am right in the middle of reining horse country (N. Texas). :) I'd be looking at some nice reining bred horses. The good reining horses have self carriage and typically have ammy friendly temperments. ;) They can be some neat dressage horses in a smaller package.

etc.
Aug. 14, 2009, 11:14 AM
My daughter has a 15h QH. The sire has Poco Bueno and Zippo Pat Bar on his side. He is retired now, but we could never ask for a better tempermant. He took her from Short stirrup through Children's with lots of wins along the way.
Probably wouldn't have made a dresssage horse, but what a kid's or ammie's horse!

used2
Aug. 14, 2009, 11:26 AM
Back in the early 80's we had a daughter of P.B. had to be one of the last she was in her 20's. Her stature and heavy muscle were out of style for halter horses even at that time. She was a good match for cutting horses and produced some nice babies. I can't imagine her as anything but a drooping rein wesern pleasure horse.

meupatdoes
Aug. 21, 2009, 10:15 AM
You should be proud, he is beautiful.

Thank you so much!

I just made a video (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NFr8X8fdCYE) of him, too (shot two days ago).

I am completely in love with that little horse. :yes:

maximus2244
Aug. 21, 2009, 02:47 PM
Sonny Go Lucky/Sonny Dee Bar horses are very athletic but a little stubborn.


Yep, I have a Sonny Dee Bar (well, a ways back, but on both the top and bottom) and he is extremely athletic, but stubborn just isn't the word for him. :lol: If you can get him to work, he moves like a dream.

He's not short though, at 16.1

He is the best horse (http://picasaweb.google.com/maximus2244/Horses#5372491239697206978).:winkgrin:

dauntless
Aug. 25, 2009, 11:10 AM
Did you see the thread about the cute little guy on the Hilltop website?