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AHorseSomeDay
Aug. 6, 2009, 08:38 PM
Just a question, would you buy a green 8 year old QH who lived out in the field for a couple of years? The horse is really cute but needs training. Do you think 8 is too old to train a horse to jump and do lead changes? Kind of a silly question but I would like to hear some thoughts and opinions.

The horse already knows how to walk, trot and canter and has great manners on the ground.

Thanks :)

FindersKeepers
Aug. 6, 2009, 09:06 PM
My Children's hunter was a green 13 yo QH mare. She had been ridden for pleasure on trails...and thats it.

I was 13 when I started working with her. It took a year to get her to a point where she was really ready to go into the show ring and be competitive, but well worth it! She was a fantastic hunter mount, and while she lacked the picture perfect confirmation, she made up for that with her easy going attitude and safe, solid jumping ability. We always pinned in the tricolors.

I once had the opportunity to speak with a judge following one of the shows (B rated, nothing spectacular) and asked out of curiosity my little red-headed QH won the division. She said "she was the only one in there that I would feel safe letting my grandchild take out fox hunting"

So, I'm biased, but I say GO FOR IT!

ETA my juniors hunter was a TB mare. She was 11 when I found her and had never been ridden anywhere but on a racetrack. We were showing in the greens 6 months later. SO age has nothing to do with it. If they have the talent and the right attitude, don't let a number stop you.

SarahandSam
Aug. 6, 2009, 09:09 PM
I have a 6-year-old green QH that is learning to jump now. He w/t/c but sometimes still gets confused about his leads... but is figuring it out. He is smart, sane and kind. I love quarter horses. It sounds like yours has a good basis and would probably learn quickly. (:

juniormom
Aug. 6, 2009, 09:38 PM
You might want to ask why it was "out in the field for a couple of years." I always like to see what the response is. Did the horse have an injury and had to be "laid up" for awhile or was it simply that noone was interested in riding it due to lack of time, etc.? That said, we have had a couple of really good ones from "out in a field" and a couple of not so good ones. Good luck with it! :) ;)

dab
Aug. 7, 2009, 02:12 AM
There's a 9yo warmblood in my barn that was pulled out of a field as an unbroke this past winter -- I heard his previous owner passed away several years ago and apparently nobody's been in a rush to find new homes for his horses --

Anyway, he's coming along well, especially considering the fact he's 17H+ -- Seems to know where his parts are unlike many of the younger big horses I'm familiar with -- He jumps nicely -- Trainer asked him for lead changes for the first time last week, and he offered them right away --

So, I wouldn't let the age scare me off -- I would be concerned about a prior injury --

blueskye
Aug. 7, 2009, 05:20 AM
In the late 90s I orked for a small scale Welsh pony breeder, who was getting out of the pony breeding. One of the broodies was a lovely, sweet small pony who had been backed as a youngster but hadn't been ridden for most of her life. She must have been about 12 or 14 years old when she was sold. She was reserve champion the folloing year in the small greens at Pony Finals.

Ozone
Aug. 7, 2009, 09:17 AM
Ahh ... I've seen it done so many times - taking the horse from the field and making them into something. It would not scare me off. Usually these horses are just pets or older folks place where the kids lost interest before the horse got a shot to be broke or started.

These horses tend to make the best horses. They start out with no miles at 8+ years old, they end up lasting a lifetime!

the lady of shalott
Aug. 7, 2009, 12:51 PM
My mare is 19 this year, I got her as a coming 14 year old who had been in pasture since she was 7. Old Barrel/rope horse used as a brood mare. I started jumping her when she was 16 and we are now going (pretty successfully!) at BN looking to move up to N (we had a two year break due to some injuries on my part) I definitely think its possible! As an eight year old, the main issue on my part would be wondering why he was in pasture (injury? bad temperament?). I think the biggest obstacle is going to be ground manners at least at first. As long as he is sound, there wouldn't be a question in my mind whether he can learn to jump and do flying changes. You really can teach an old horse new tricks!

O also to add, as my mare had been out to pasture for so long, getting her in shape/balanced up was our biggest issue. Conditioning rides will be your best friend. O and some basic dressage work to ;)

Janet
Aug. 7, 2009, 01:16 PM
Not too old at all.

Spy was 10 when I started him.

ETA I agree it makes sense for a "keeper" but not for a sales project. I intended Spy as a sales project, but never sold him. I did lease him out for 6 years, but never sold him, and he is now may pasture ornament.

H/J Anonymous
Aug. 7, 2009, 01:19 PM
If he is super green then it would not be a great prospect as far as resale is concerned and maybe not for yourself either. If some of the riding foundations are there and he seems super willing, it might be okay. Unless he has a great deal of potential. If it is something you are wanting for yourself to enjoy, 8 doesn't seem to old. I just think as an investment prospect the age would bother me -- especially with the market today and what is available.

Czar
Aug. 7, 2009, 01:31 PM
If he is super green then it would not be a great prospect as far as resale is concerned and maybe not for yourself either. If some of the riding foundations are there and he seems super willing, it might be okay. Unless he has a great deal of potential. If it is something you are wanting for yourself to enjoy, 8 doesn't seem to old. I just think as an investment prospect the age would bother me -- especially with the market today and what is available.

Bingo.

Resale...don't even look in the double digits unless it's free.

AND H/J raised a SUPER important point...how willing is the horse? I'm sure there are plenty of wonderful stories out there about the times it worked out but you must consider the temperament of the horse. There are plenty of "types" who would not be easy to pull out of a field at an older age and be made into productive citizens.

Also, make sure you do your homework. There are fantastic deals to be had in certain situations like an owner passing away or sickness or just not enough time but there are also horses that were turned out to pasture for a reason ;)

LShipley
Aug. 7, 2009, 02:23 PM
My mare was a w/t/ maybe c? trail horse until 8, when a pro gave her a few months training, leased her to me as a beginner horse (not a lot of training, so she didn't care about jiggly legs and all that), and then I bought her at age 9, and she learned lead changes. She loves to jump, and is a wonderful partner.

I think an older green horse can be great for a novice rider who wants to learn about the training process (if you have a trainer to help!).

AHorseSomeDay
Aug. 7, 2009, 09:06 PM
Thanks for your responses. Apparently it was a teenager who owned him and she lost interest in riding and in the horse and they didn't want to sell the horse. He is a nice horse and supposed to have really nice bloodlines. He has an S brand on his but so it makes him different. If I were to buy him, I would have him vetted out. Being a QH, I would get his hocks and front feet xrayed.

He does have a crack on his right front hoof that has been patched and he needs to build up his muscle tone so he does need a lot of work.

My trainer said I wouldn't have a problem selling him but in this economy it would be pretty tough.

H/J Anonymous
Aug. 7, 2009, 09:50 PM
Bingo.

Resale...don't even look in the double digits unless it's free.

AND H/J raised a SUPER important point...how willing is the horse? I'm sure there are plenty of wonderful stories out there about the times it worked out but you must consider the temperament of the horse. There are plenty of "types" who would not be easy to pull out of a field at an older age and be made into productive citizens.

Also, make sure you do your homework. There are fantastic deals to be had in certain situations like an owner passing away or sickness or just not enough time but there are also horses that were turned out to pasture for a reason ;)

I always tell amateurs to focus on three specifics that they feel are important when shopping for green prospects and not to detour from those top three. My top three things are: soundness, temperament, and ability; in this specific order.

My reason for putting soundness first is because if you don't start with a sound horse you are very limited where you will be able to go with the training because you are starting with huge issues.

Temperament is second, above ability, because you as an amateur are suppose to be doing the majority of the training and if you cannot handle/ride the temperament, then you are again in a very tough situation.

Third is always ability for me since if I do not have the above two situations the ability does not matter since I would most likely not be successful in brining out that ability.

I know this sounds crazy, but there are so many things that buyers tend to look for above these things when buying green horses that I find a little stupid....like they are so pretty, they have cool markings, they have great personalities, etc....

Oh, and seriously consider what Czar said about the well-bred prosepcts available right now that are younger. I wish I was in the market right now for a new project -- it really is great time for it!

AHorseSomeDay
Aug. 16, 2009, 02:58 PM
Well I am now half leasing the horse for this month. So far it's been working out. I started jumping him over small jumps. He is really easy and fun to ride. I found him to be smart and he learns really quick. What's really nice is that all you have to say is whoa and he immediately stops or slows down. Whichever one you want him to do.

I am hoping to find someone to half lease him with me. If I were to find someone, then I would buy him if he passed the vet check.

But we'll have to see.

indygirl2560
Aug. 16, 2009, 04:42 PM
I think you could if you know how to do the training or you know someone you could pay to do it. I got my pony(who was sold earlier this year) out of a pasture at age 7. She'd never been backed and was only halter broke. In a year and a half, I turned her into a children's low hunter/eq pony(took her to a few shows and cleaned up) and then she sold for over twice what she was purchased for(I didn't technically own her, I just put all the training on her). I definitely think it's possible if you know what you're doing and the horse is reasonably cooperative. Good luck!

Brown Horse
Aug. 16, 2009, 10:20 PM
I got an 8 yr old OTTB that had been sitting in a field since he retired from racing (at 5yrs old). The main problem was that he had become a bully b/c he knew how big he was (17.1hh) - that's been our biggest obstacle. I worked on ground manners FIRST and got him to behave there. Then I started with the riding :) He's my once in a lifetime horse! Even if he does still have I'm a Big Bully moments every now and then.

I agree with everyone else though, find out his medical history and do a thorough PPE.

chestnutwithchrome
Aug. 16, 2009, 10:59 PM
My horse was a broodmare until she was 10. She was then sold and the new owners decided she was going to be the husband's trail horse. They sent her to a professional to start, and apparently she hated life for the first 30 days and did Not want to be a riding horse! Then it kicked in that it wasn't so bad after all. I bought her at 11 and began riding her english, started jumping her 6 months later, and am now successfully eventing her at the novice level at age 16. She is easier to train and try new things on than a young horse in my opinion because she is mature and level headed, although she is a hot and stubborn chestnut mare!

http://s597.photobucket.com/albums/tt51/crazkat13/Garnet/?action=view&current=5980_109099113425_502798425_2216432.jpg

http://s597.photobucket.com/albums/tt51/crazkat13/Garnet/?action=view&current=5980_109099153425_502798425_2216437.jpg

LetsRide
Aug. 17, 2009, 12:19 AM
He does have a crack on his right front hoof that has been patched and he needs to build up his muscle tone so he does need a lot of work.


I would not consider a horse in pasture shape with bad feet (such as a 1/4 crack) as any sort of jumper prospect. No way will the horse hold up to jump.