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View Full Version : Anyone ever tie stirrups? is this legal?



AGRHJRider
Aug. 6, 2009, 08:20 PM
When i was in college i had a trainer who would tie our stirrups to the girth with a shoelace. The theory behind it was to basically train our leg muscles to sit where they needed to be. We rode this way a few times a week and sometimes over fences. It wasn't something we depended on just a schooling aid.
Has anyone else ever done this? And do you think its legal to show in?

ExJumper
Aug. 6, 2009, 08:22 PM
Yes I've done it for schooling, and yes it is illegal to do it at shows.

I don't have time to find the rule right now, but it is specifically forbidden.

wesierobb
Aug. 6, 2009, 08:36 PM
3. Any rider competing and or riding anywhere on the competition grounds with their stirrup,stirrup leather, or foot tied and/or secured in any manner, will automatically be eliminated from the entire competition. The steward will note the trainer name(s) on the stewards report and further disciplinary actions may be taken by the Federation:eek:

klmck63
Aug. 6, 2009, 08:38 PM
Kind of a nice schooling aid to use every once and a while but definitely not allowed at shows!

flogarty
Aug. 6, 2009, 08:41 PM
I knew a trainer that would use thin fishing line around a stirrup to the girth of an older adult (think 60 ish- 60+) when they were showing.

MILOUTE55
Aug. 6, 2009, 09:19 PM
3. Any rider competing and or riding anywhere on the competition grounds with their stirrup,stirrup leather, or foot tied and/or secured in any manner, will automatically be eliminated from the entire competition. The steward will note the trainer name(s) on the stewards report and further disciplinary actions may be taken by the Federation:eek:

but I've seen riders using those at very high level (Ludger Berbaum at a show in Italy to be more precise):

http://www.freejumpsystem.com/uk/#/produits/xup/

maybe it was allowed and is not anymore? Or maybe it's because the foot will still separate from the stirrup in case of fall? I don't know... What do you think?

*JumpIt*
Aug. 6, 2009, 09:26 PM
I am pretty sure it is 1. because it is cheating and everyone would have a perfect leg if it was allowed. 2. Because the stirrup is "suppose" to slide off the stirrup bar if the foot gets stuck to prevent a drag, if the stirrup was tied then they would certainly be dragged.

superpony123
Aug. 6, 2009, 09:39 PM
I've never done this and it's absolutely illegal and you can be disqualified for tying stirrups. It's a popular schooling aid, though. I prefer good old fashioned no-stirrups.

subk
Aug. 6, 2009, 09:42 PM
but I've seen riders using those at very high level (Ludger Berbaum at a show in Italy to be more precise):

http://www.freejumpsystem.com/uk/#/produits/xup/

maybe it was allowed and is not anymore? Or maybe it's because the foot will still separate from the stirrup in case of fall? I don't know... What do you think?
Italy doesn't show under the United States Eq. Federation rules so it might be fine. The FEI has it's own set of rules as well...

mvp
Aug. 6, 2009, 09:53 PM
It's a *great* schooling aid for riders who ride with their legs "scissored"-- one slightly ahead of the other. That's a hard problem to see and correct, but the cause of big problems. Stirrupless won't touch that one.

Tied stirrups brought me to Jesus and I have been known to school, jump even trail ride in them. Having fallen off once or twice with my trusty baling twine on, I didn't think my feet were any more likely to get stuck. I must say, I have never fallen off in a way that took the whole stirrup leather with me. However, being dragged by a stirrup attached by baling twine to my horse's girth would probably be a fitting way for a redneck-wannabe-equitation-princess like me to go.

Had no idea I couldn't school in these at shows. Oops. I figured if Ludger could do it, so could I. I stand corrected. Thanks.

Seven-up
Aug. 6, 2009, 10:19 PM
I've done it. Used a few loops of yarn, strong enough to hold your leg there but flimsy enough to break if any real pressure is put on it.

Only for a lesson because of the illegal-ness of it at a show. If I recall, we only did it once, to get a feel for where the leg should be.

And yes, I talked to Jesus too when I jumped with stirrups tied for the first time.:lol:

Janet
Aug. 6, 2009, 10:29 PM
Illegal for hunters

3. Any rider competing and or riding anywhere on the competition grounds with their stirrup,
stirrup leather, or foot tied and/or secured in any manner, will automatically be eliminated
from the entire competition. The steward will note the trainer name(s) on the stewards
report and further disciplinary actions may be taken by the Federation.
Illegal for jumpers

4. Tied Stirrups. Any rider competing with their stirrup, stirrup leather or foot tied and/or
secured in any manner, will automatically be eliminated from that class. Riding anywhere on
the competition grounds with stirrup, stirrup leather or foot tied or otherwise secured is
cause for elimination, by the steward, of that rider from the current or subsequent class in
which the rider is entered. In the case of junior or amateur riders, the steward will note the
trainer name(s) on the Steward’s Report and further disciplinary actions may be taken by
the Federation. Exception: Devices approved by the FEI are allowed.
Illegal for Eventing


In the interest of safety, the stirrup iron and stirrup leathers
must hang free from the bar of the saddle and outside the flap. There must be no other
restrictions or attachments of any kind.
Illegal for Dressage

English-style stirrups, without attachments, or safety stirrups are compulsory.

Hunter Mom
Aug. 6, 2009, 10:33 PM
I've done it. Used a few loops of yarn, strong enough to hold your leg there but flimsy enough to break if any real pressure is put on it.

Definitely illegal (as in pack your horse and go home NOW illegal) at shows - in classes or not. However, I have done it myself at home, but only with yarn, just to break a bad habit of flipping my leg back. I did it one day and Mare had a moment - yarn was flimsy enough to break when I needed it to. That was good.

mvp
Aug. 6, 2009, 10:49 PM
Wow. That's quite an a$$-kicking by the USEF just for tied stirrups. I can think of some other infractions that I'd put ahead of this one...

SarahandSam
Aug. 6, 2009, 11:07 PM
I've never heard of it before but I'd like to try it for schooling now... I feel like I don't notice if my leg starts to drift so it would be a good way to check. d; Not at all surprised it's illegal for showing though! And a trainer using fishing line to make it invisible is pretty darn sheisty.

Madeline
Aug. 6, 2009, 11:16 PM
I'm constantly amazed at what people will confess to in a public forum...

dghunter
Aug. 6, 2009, 11:36 PM
My trainer's had me do it a couple times, made a HUGE difference! I think it helps because then I can really feel over the fence where my leg is supposed to be and I get to know that feeling and then can apply it without the string.

Janet
Aug. 7, 2009, 12:07 AM
Illegal in the US NOW.

But I have a book with a picture of Hans Gunther Winkler jumping (at Aachen I think) jumping with his stirrups tied, and a positive caption.

the lady of shalott
Aug. 7, 2009, 12:24 AM
I had a trainer DUCK TAPE my legs to the cinch once (western saddle) Yup you heard it ladies... duck tape. Yes, I was the worst of the leg swinging at the canter, but I didn't think it was that drastic. And no, I never trained with her again. Good ole 4-H *eye roll*

As everyone has said, very illegal in showing. I've never seen anyone do it in schooling, but to each their own=] Does it actually help train your leg?

klmck63
Aug. 7, 2009, 12:52 AM
but I've seen riders using those at very high level (Ludger Berbaum at a show in Italy to be more precise):

http://www.freejumpsystem.com/uk/#/produits/xup/

maybe it was allowed and is not anymore? Or maybe it's because the foot will still separate from the stirrup in case of fall? I don't know... What do you think?

Unless I misunderstood the website these do not hold the stirrup or foot to the girth in anyway, so not the same thing. I *think* that these are legal since they have the safety release function, but maybe not in the US.


I'm constantly amazed at what people will confess to in a public forum...

Lol. Tying stirrups to the girth with yarn or bailing twine or whatever is a pretty commonly accepted practice that I have seen lots of reputable trainers use at home while schooling to help reinforce where the leg should be. And if I'm not mistaken, no one ever admitted to doing it themselves at shows.

Janet
Aug. 7, 2009, 06:56 AM
but I've seen riders using those at very high level (Ludger Berbaum at a show in Italy to be more precise):

http://www.freejumpsystem.com/uk/#/produits/xup/

maybe it was allowed and is not anymore? Or maybe it's because the foot will still separate from the stirrup in case of fall? I don't know... What do you think?
I think those are covered for jumpers, at USEF shows, by
Exception: Devices approved by the FEI are allowed.

luvs2ride
Aug. 7, 2009, 06:59 AM
An old trainer of mine used spur straps for one of her riders at a show once or twice... not that they were exactly known to do things by the book ;)

JWB
Aug. 7, 2009, 10:49 AM
I knew a trainer that would use thin fishing line around a stirrup to the girth of an older adult (think 60 ish- 60+) when they were showing.


klmck63 - See post# 5

Personal Champ
Aug. 7, 2009, 11:02 AM
Okay, I have a friend who is compulsive about her heels, which usually ends up with her legs jacked out in front of her. I think that this may help.

Not to sound like an idiot, but how do you do it? She has a girth with the side dees, can I tie the leather to the dee???

klmck63
Aug. 7, 2009, 11:47 AM
klmck63 - See post# 5

I just meant that nobody had said "Oh, I do that at shows all the time!". This person was saying they knew someone who did which isn't exactly an admission of guilt on a public forum.

dghunter
Aug. 7, 2009, 12:40 PM
I just meant that nobody had said "Oh, I do that at shows all the time!". This person was saying they knew someone who did which isn't exactly an admission of guilt on a public forum.

I suppose it's an admission of guilt for that person (who tied the stirrups) :lol: But no one has said "my trainer has students do it" or "I do it" so no, no real admission of guilt on here.

Renn/aissance
Aug. 7, 2009, 12:44 PM
It's something I keep meaning to do as a schooling aid because, due to a back issue, I ride with my legs scissored and it does indeed cause me trouble, and I have no idea where the legs actually need to go. At what point on the girth do you guys attach the yarn? In the Y for the split end? Around the girth itself?

OneonOne
Aug. 7, 2009, 12:51 PM
We used to do this as a schooling refresher.

We tied a loop of baling twine on the stirrup, and then just ran the girth through the loops. No d-rings, not around the elastic.

Madeline
Aug. 7, 2009, 01:12 PM
I wasn't saying that it was an admission of guilt, just an admission of stupidity...

Seven-up
Aug. 7, 2009, 01:30 PM
Okay, I have a friend who is compulsive about her heels, which usually ends up with her legs jacked out in front of her. I think that this may help.

Not to sound like an idiot, but how do you do it? She has a girth with the side dees, can I tie the leather to the dee???

If I recall, we used 3 loops of yarn. Loop it thru the stirrup iron, then around the girth right at the point where the stirrup hangs naturally. The dees might be too high up on the girth, but I don't know exactly what the girth looks like. You want to be able to pull the stirrup several inches away from the girth to allow for a little bit of movement. The point is not to lock the leg in place, but to gently remind the rider where the leg goes.


Advice from one "stupid" ;) person to another. ;):lol:

mvp
Aug. 7, 2009, 01:31 PM
Here's what you want to do:

Get a piece of bailing twine, yarn or whatever, and tie it in a loop that includes the inside branch of your stirrup and the girth.

The loop will be more or less parallel to the ground when you're on, so don't anchor it to any D-rings on the girth.

Here's the important part: Put *at least* a hand's width of distance between the girth and your stirrup. We normally have our stirrups farther out from the horse's sides when we are actually riding, especially in a two-point. It will really hurt your knees and make you feel like you are chair-seating-it/falling backward if the loops are too short.

Of course your conformation and your horse's will help determine how generous of a loop you need. Err on the side of too much, but consider some other parts of a "good leg gone bad."

Before you do this, or to make it effective, or to not trash your knees, you need to make sure that you are good at turning your toes forward (really, the whole leg) from the hip. Get on, arrange yourself that way and then pick up your tied stirrups. Walking should make your leg feel "claustrophobic" but it shouldn't hurt.

In the posting trot, if your knees hurt, think about relaxing your leg each stride until they stop barking. Accepting knees means you are, in fact, putting your leg on the horse with toe-to-hip facing forward. If your knee hurts, you are turning out from the hip.

This revision to your riding position involved building either lots or different kinds of strength, and the tied stirrups will force you to do that. It may take some time before you can use them without hurting yourself at the two-point, so go slow.

Personal Champ
Aug. 7, 2009, 08:48 PM
Thanks for the advice! I don't like to proceed in illegal activity without proper knowledge. :lol:

AGRHJRider
Aug. 8, 2009, 01:01 AM
MVP i think this is a great start for a weekly tips and tricks section on COTH or maybe we can collaborate on How to" from a pusher of illegal things for DUMMIES! lol

Not that we ever do anything illegal lol.
I never let my kids show in tied stirrups, but my feeling is that this is kind of similar to a "shoulders back" apparatus in what it does for the rider. I dont have my kids show in it, but repeatedly using it develops proper muscle alignment and posture and trains the muscles to do the job correct. Proper leg position becomes a habit.
To each his own though.

Haalter
Aug. 8, 2009, 09:00 AM
I wasn't saying that it was an admission of guilt, just an admission of stupidity...An admission of someone else's stupidity? Huh?

I once rode with a trainer who regularly used this exercise at home using yarn and it really helped train my leg to be in the right position, and this same trainer also insisted we have our hair up under our helmets every lesson. She happens to have trained a number of International level riders. How's that for stupid :lol:

mvp
Aug. 8, 2009, 03:57 PM
OK, then, I'm totally stupid-- both to tie my stirrups and to confess to that here. But I do ride straight.

The only truly stupid thing I did was to school in my contraption at shows because I trusted pictures of Ludger Beerbaum instead of the USEF rulebook to tell me what was what.

Don't be hatin' on the stupid people. Or if you do, don't be ripping off their faboo/stupid advice. Get your straightness some other way.

Or, screw it, just try the system above in the privacy of your own arena and admit it to no one.