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View Full Version : Dumb as a rock but (leg yielding into correct lead)



BumbleBee
Aug. 6, 2009, 05:41 PM
Imagine you have a horse resisting right lead canter.

If you were going to leg yield into the canter to help set the horse up which way would you leg yield?

I have been doing what I thought was correct with not great results then listened to "Cowboy Jim" at our stable and for kicks gave it a shot his way. Yeah and it worked every time but I am now a bit confused as it seams counter intuitive his way...

Nojacketrequired
Aug. 6, 2009, 05:44 PM
Say you were coming down centre line, you would leg yield to the LEFT, meet the rail and ask for the canter right while the horse is still firmly on the outside rein and bent around your inside leg.



Check out First level test 1 (I think?) for the correct way to approach it.

NJR

Gloria
Aug. 6, 2009, 05:55 PM
It really depends on the horse. Whatever works for your horse is the right way. What you are trying to accomplish is to supple the horse, activate his lazy hind leg whatever it is, position his body so it is easy for him to take the lead, and sharpen his response to your aid.

I have tried leg yielding from left leg along the wall, straighten the horse, then right lead canter. I have tried leg yield from right leg to the wall, then right lead canter. I have tried shoulder-in on right bend then right lead canter. I have tried haunches in for three steps, shoulder in for three steps, repeat, shoulder-in, then canter. All of them work and all of them help you to get what you want.

NorCalDressage
Aug. 6, 2009, 05:55 PM
Depends where the resistance is -

For right lead canter -

Leg yield from the right leg would activate the inside hind, but if the problem is with the inside shoulder not being free/supple, this will not really help you.

Leg yielding from the left leg would free up the inside shoulder (and activate the outside hind for the depart) Different solutions for different problems....

ThreeFigs
Aug. 6, 2009, 05:55 PM
Dittos, NJR!

Is that how Cowboy Jim told you to do it?

BumbleBee
Aug. 6, 2009, 07:25 PM
Say you were coming down centre line, you would leg yield to the LEFT, meet the rail and ask for the canter right while the horse is still firmly on the outside rein and bent around your inside leg.



Check out First level test 1 (I think?) for the correct way to approach it.

NJR

That is what I was doing. Good hear I am not as dumb as a rock. Honestly this had worked for other horses I tried it on but not this gelding.

BumbleBee
Aug. 6, 2009, 07:29 PM
It really depends on the horse. Whatever works for your horse is the right way. What you are trying to accomplish is to supple the horse, activate his lazy hind leg whatever it is, position his body so it is easy for him to take the lead, and sharpen his response to your aid.

I have tried leg yielding from left leg along the wall, straighten the horse, then right lead canter. I have tried leg yield from right leg to the wall, then right lead canter. I have tried shoulder-in on right bend then right lead canter. I have tried haunches in for three steps, shoulder in for three steps, repeat, shoulder-in, then canter. All of them work and all of them help you to get what you want.

Guess I should have asked you a few moths ago.

I had done the leg yield left into right lead canter, shoulder in into right lead canter but neither worked for this fellow. I was allergic to haunches in due to my old mare using it as an evasion so I never tried it with current gelding but dang it I never would have thought to try leg yield right, into right lead canter.

BumbleBee
Aug. 6, 2009, 07:31 PM
Depends where the resistance is -

For right lead canter -

Leg yield from the right leg would activate the inside hind, but if the problem is with the inside shoulder not being free/supple, this will not really help you.

Leg yielding from the left leg would free up the inside shoulder (and activate the outside hind for the depart) Different solutions for different problems....

Okay smarty pants I tip my hat to you this was exactly what Cowboy Jim's comments were.

BumbleBee
Aug. 6, 2009, 07:40 PM
Dittos, NJR!

Is that how Cowboy Jim told you to do it?

Nope me, you and NJR are still cantering on the wrong lead with this gelding.

Really though I don't think I will ever ignore unsolicited advise again.
He is an old style western pleasure trainer. For the most part we do things exactly opposite but damn if he didn't just give me the key to my geldings right lead.

Between the last two rides I asked his way maybe 25 times and got the right lead every single time.

I will be leaving him a lesson fee and tip for that 20 minute impromptu miracle lesson.

lorilu
Aug. 7, 2009, 04:29 PM
Isn't that really similar to the old trick of turning the horse's head OUT as you ask for canter?

L

BumbleBee
Aug. 7, 2009, 05:00 PM
Isn't that really similar to the old trick of turning the horse's head OUT as you ask for canter?

L


Funny I was so desperate I tried that a while ago with no luck at all.

Gloria
Aug. 7, 2009, 05:19 PM
Isn't that really similar to the old trick of turning the horse's head OUT as you ask for canter?

L


Nay, if you turn the horse's head out to ask for canter, he is crooked and that kind of crookedness is rather hard to fix. All the leg yield, shoulder-in thinging either activate hind leg or free up the stuck shoulder so the horse can strike off canter balanced.

Nojacketrequired
Aug. 7, 2009, 05:47 PM
Dittos, NJR!

Is that how Cowboy Jim told you to do it?

Well, Ma'am...I can't say as I know any Cowboy Jim, but this is how those Swiss Cowboys Sven, Uli and Carlo taught me to do it.

NJR

Movin Artfully
Sep. 1, 2009, 04:00 PM
Well, Ma'am...I can't say as I know any Cowboy Jim, but this is how those Swiss Cowboys Sven, Uli and Carlo taught me to do it.

NJR

LOVE IT :yes:

KBEquine
Sep. 1, 2009, 06:21 PM
Nope me, you and NJR are still cantering on the wrong lead with this gelding.

Now you're just cracking me up. Which might be because I'm . . . NOT on the wrong lead. I'm counter-cantering. Really. I meant to do that . . . :winkgrin: Okay. I'm on the wrong lead with you (the only difference was I was leg-yielding out on a circle & that's really no difference at all!)


I will be leaving him a lesson fee and tip for that 20 minute impromptu miracle lesson.

Very nice - that tangible kind of thank you doesn't happen nearly enough.

I used to board at a horse show grounds where you would be amazed at what you'd see in the schooling ring. But some of it was really worth watching (as in, to learn something good) and some was worth watching (to remember to avoid the area when that show came back to town).

And I saw some of the best horsemanship in some of the most surprising places. It's hard to listen some times, but so worthwhile when you do.