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View Full Version : Saddle fit experiment - has anyone ever tried this?



Blacktree
Aug. 6, 2009, 02:32 AM
After looking for a year and buying several saddles, I'm still without a dressage saddle that will work. :( Nothing seems to fit our stallion, even though he has never been hard to find a jumping saddle for.

My last attempt was a Wintec Isabell - I thought that with the adjustable tree and air panels, I might have a better chance of having things work. But it sits too close to his spine. rrrrr. Buying and trying saddles by mail is getting old (and expensive) and no tack shops w/ a lot of saddles in stock are close by. I was actually thinking of approaching a trainer at one of our local dressage barns and asking if they would be willing to have me pay to haul my horse in and try any of their student's saddles on him that are willing to let me (under their supervision of course). I don't even need to ride in the saddles, I just want to be able to go to one place and put a bunch of saddles on him - to get a feel for a brand/model could work for us (w/o all the delay of doing this one at a time by mail). Has anyone tried anything like this before, or is this idea pretty 'out there'?

Also, any suggestions? He fits in most regular treed jump saddles - but most of the dressage saddles I've tried seem to be a bit wide for him (if they have enough clearance), or they are well balanced but sit too low on him. I'm not very tall, so I'm also hoping for something that doesn't have super long flaps. Other than that I'm not too picky, I just want something decently well made that isn't a custom price.

Ambrey
Aug. 6, 2009, 02:34 AM
How about something like Schleese or Custom Saddlery where they bring saddles out for you to try?

buck22
Aug. 6, 2009, 08:37 AM
After looking for a year and buying several saddles, I'm still without a dressage saddle that will work. :( Nothing seems to fit our stallion, even though he has never been hard to find a jumping saddle for.

Also, any suggestions? He fits in most regular treed jump saddles - but most of the dressage saddles I've tried seem to be a bit wide for him (if they have enough clearance), or they are well balanced but sit too low on him. I'm not very tall, so I'm also hoping for something that doesn't have super long flaps. Other than that I'm not too picky, I just want something decently well made that isn't a custom price.
For the last 2 years, I have bought & sold saddles in my quest to find one for my horse. I keep a log and journal, and just recently counted 44 saddles that I've bought & sold :eek: Thats my saddle experiment/school :)

I've learned a lot. I've learned what my body likes, I've learned how different styles can really affect one's riding. I've learned the pro & cons of being stuck in boofy deep seat vs unsupported in an open minimal flat seat (and I like 'em both actually :D). I've learned how to care for leather, and how to spot the hallmarks of craftsmanship. I've learned about the intricacies of fit for my horse, and what to pay attention to. And I've learned the remarkable lesson of "if the saddle doesn't fit the horse properly, you will be thrown into a chair seat or tipped forward with a hollow back" its not the saddle's fault.

But the most valuable lesson I've learned is that it all boils down to what the horse says about the fit. Some of the saddles that my horse likes going in the best, look like not-so-perfect fits, and some of the ideal fitting saddles, my horse despises.

My advice to you is to consider professional help, someone who can look at a tracing and put you in the right direction. I think the idea of going someplace and just setting lots of saddles down on your boy's back is a marvelous idea, see as many shapes and designs as possible. But I advise that you need to, at one point, ride the saddle before committing to it. For example, you might find Albions suit your horse's build, but I wouldn't go out and buy one until you at least ride one.

There is no shortcut for experience, imho one can either hire experienced help, or put in the time like I'm doing (I'm a hardheaded irish-woman :) never said I was smart :) )

I've learned that its critical to ride the saddle, not just slap 'em down and feel for gaps. Fortunately for me, my horse is so sensitive, I get a yeah or nay when I tighten the girth, but I verify that with a 45min ride too (just to torture the poor pony :lol: but seriously, to look at pad & sweat marks).

A friend has a saddle of mine on loan, she rode her recently deceased TB in it. She LOVED the saddle for herself, and the sweat marks and dirt marks on the pad were perfect, everything about the fit was perfect, and yet the horse despised the saddle. :confused: and was happy as a clam in some old $300 stubben that had an awkward yet passable fit. :confused:

I'd love to see photos of the saddles on your horse though. "Well balanced but sits too low" has got me imagining lots of different things. Is it not possible to find a solution in padding? I'm envisioning a saddle that is a perfect shape, but just slightly too large overall. :confused:

I hope this is helpful

retrofit
Aug. 6, 2009, 10:12 AM
You say that most jump saddles fit him but dressage saddles do not. The biggest difference between jump vs dressage saddles is that dressage saddles have longer tree points. My guess is that the longer tree points don't conform to your horse's conformation around the withers & shoulders.

In my experience, you have 3 good options -

1. Look for a dressage saddle with tree points that angle back. Try Hennig, Custom Saddlery (I know the Wolfgang Solo is like this, not sure about their other models), and Kieffer Orphee. There may be other saddles that I'm not aware of.

2. Look for a dressage saddle built on a jumping tree. Jaguar, Cobra, Dominus, Harry Dabbs, and some Amerigo models fit this bill. There are others but I can't think of their names right now. The only drawback here is these saddles tend to have very up-swept panels (in back) so if your horse has a longer, flatter back this may not disperse weight enough for his comfort.

3. Look for a saddle with gussets in the front panels. Black Country does this and I think Passier's Freedom Panels address this need, although I have yet to see them in person. Although the tree points are still long, these gussets allow for a much more custom fit around withers/shoulders.

I hope this helps you & your horse.

Gloria
Aug. 6, 2009, 11:09 AM
When you say the saddles you tried did not fit, did you mean that they plain will not work? The reason I ask is, I have yet encountered a saddle that will fit my boys from the get go.

What I need to do is, to find a saddle that has the right tree width and the right overall tree shape ( I mean the whole tree not just the tree point), and get the saddle fitter to reflock it. And a good saddle fitter should be able to tell you whether the tree shape works for your boy.

Most jumping saddles are made of foam stuffed so most jumpers don't think about reflocking. However, most good dressage saddles are made of materials that can be reflocked.

Rival
Aug. 6, 2009, 11:29 AM
Have you tried a Childeric or a l'apogee?

Blacktree
Aug. 6, 2009, 01:24 PM
How about something like Schleese or Custom Saddlery where they bring saddles out for you to try?

That sounds lovely - but we are writing a BIG check today to the guy putting in our arena, so my husband would *kill* me if I spent that much money on something custom, esp. in the Schleese price range. :lol:


For the last 2 years, I have bought & sold saddles in my quest to find one for my horse. I keep a log and journal, and just recently counted 44 saddles that I've bought & sold :eek: Thats my saddle experiment/school :)

Holy cow, 44 saddles!! I totally would have given up. :winkgrin:


But the most valuable lesson I've learned is that it all boils down to what the horse says about the fit. Some of the saddles that my horse likes going in the best, look like not-so-perfect fits, and some of the ideal fitting saddles, my horse despises.

I hear you there. My old gelding was VERY particular and let me know QUICK if he didn't like a saddle. Sometimes the ones that looked perfect fit-wise, he rejected. Our stallion on the other hand is such a good boy, he just tries to make everything work without being so obvious about how happy he is (or isn't). Who knew that could be a bad thing?


I think the idea of going someplace and just setting lots of saddles down on your boy's back is a marvelous idea, see as many shapes and designs as possible. But I advise that you need to, at one point, ride the saddle before committing to it. For example, you might find Albions suit your horse's build, but I wouldn't go out and buy one until you at least ride one.

I would definitely also want to ride in one before buying, but I thought this could give me a good starting point, help me to get a feel for what brands/models seem to work for him and which don't.


I'd love to see photos of the saddles on your horse though. "Well balanced but sits too low" has got me imagining lots of different things. Is it not possible to find a solution in padding? I'm envisioning a saddle that is a perfect shape, but just slightly too large overall. :confused:

The 'well balanced but sits too low' saddle I still have, so I could take some pictures of that one. That's the Isabell. It looks good on him from the ground, though not as much clearance as would be ideal (the bottom panels on either side of the gullet aren't thick enough). It looked like that could be a problem, so I just took him on a 15 minute walk hack in it, then did about 20 steps of trot. When I took it off I felt HORRIBLE. The muscles about 6 inches back - on both sides of his spine - were quite raised and tight. I checked in the channel of the saddle in that same place, and sure enough, there was a part of the tree that you could feel through the channel there, that must have come in contact with him. I have a dense foam pad that could raise the whole saddle a 1/4", but after seeing his poor back like that just from walking, I don't know if I want to try it on him again. And he was such a good boy! You'd never had known that was happening, poor guy.


You say that most jump saddles fit him but dressage saddles do not. The biggest difference between jump vs dressage saddles is that dressage saddles have longer tree points. My guess is that the longer tree points don't conform to your horse's conformation around the withers & shoulders.

That sounds right, that's where most of these dressage saddles aren't fitting him. He has a pretty normal topline but is a bit narrow further down, in the barrel/shoulders. Most saddles have been too low in front.


Look for a saddle with gussets in the front panels. Black Country does this and I think Passier's Freedom Panels address this need, although I have yet to see them in person. Although the tree points are still long, these gussets allow for a much more custom fit around withers/shoulders.

Retrofit - VERY helpful post - thank you so much! Could you clarify what you mean above by 'gussets in the front panels'?


When you say the saddles you tried did not fit, did you mean that they plain will not work? The reason I ask is, I have yet encountered a saddle that will fit my boys from the get go.

What I need to do is, to find a saddle that has the right tree width and the right overall tree shape ( I mean the whole tree not just the tree point), and get the saddle fitter to reflock it. And a good saddle fitter should be able to tell you whether the tree shape works for your boy.

I've thought of this and may definitely go that route if I find one that looks pretty good on him but could use some minor adjustments. How much does it usually cost to reflock a saddle?


Have you tried a Childeric or a l'apogee?

Haven't even heard of those brands. I'll check them out. So far we've tried a Bates, a Wintec, a Crosby and 2 Courbettes.

mbm
Aug. 6, 2009, 01:26 PM
i totally can relate. i have a difficult to fit mare that i have had many different saddles for.....

i have finally bitten the bullet and gone "custom" - but since i cant afford a new custom, made to fit me and my horse saddle, i am doing the 2nd best thing which is to have the saddermaker find a good fitting used saddle from his line and then re flock for a good fit. IT wont be a great fitting as a totally custom saddle, but it will fit better than an off the rack model.

anyway, total cost to me $1950

Feel free to PM me for name of saddler - i think he comes to your area....

ETA: re: your OP - i think it is *brilliant* idea about going to a large barn and trying all the saddles.... super duper idea!

eta again to say - i have learned a lot about saddle/fitting/etc in m search for a decent saddle... and what i have found i that in general the off the rack models dont have good fitting trees - and since the trees are not made to fit then the saddle will always be "wonky"

and the reason why the trees don't fit is various basic form issues and the fact that they are trying to make a tree for the "average" horse...... and if you don't that that perfect average horse you are out of luck.

buck22
Aug. 6, 2009, 01:28 PM
Retrofit - VERY helpful post - thank you so much! Could you clarify what you mean above by 'gussets in the front panels'?
this is a superb site for explaining parts of the saddle,
http://www.trumbullmtn.com/Other_Pages/saddle_termgy/saddle_term.htm

about halfway down the page is a photo of "wither gussets"

Ambrey
Aug. 6, 2009, 01:37 PM
Custom Saddlery is much less expensive than Schleese, and despite the name they have off the rack saddles ;) I was more thinking about the fact that they'll bring them to you.

As for a horse with a wither and a hollow around it, my pony is like that and the Neidersuss in medium fits him really well. The other option, although not as good, is to pad it up a bit at the top with a correction pad.

You can have a saddle re-flocked to fit as well.

kpony
Aug. 6, 2009, 01:47 PM
I have paid between $100 (reflocking & adjustments) to almost $400 (more like a total rebuild of the whole underside of saddle - so semi-custom fit for horse). Definitely worth it if you like the saddle to begin with.

Gloria
Aug. 6, 2009, 01:52 PM
Around here in central Oklahoma, the saddle fitting runs about $90, plus fitter's traveling expenses. When the saddle fitter came, he told me what brands of saddles will most likely work with my horses and what will mostly not work. In the past two years, I purchased one used Albion and two used County, and have them reflocked to fit my boys. I have been very happy with the result.

And really I dislike any of those exchangeable gullet thingy. Think about it, an ideal tree will coform to your horse's back to provide even contact and elimiate pressure points. To make exchangeable gullet work, the tree itself has to be somehow in two pieces. And the edge of the two pieces of tree can cause extreme pressure. Imagine what it is like to wear a backpack where the hard plastic piece has broken, and then put 100+ lb of pressure on it. I can just flinch to think about it.

Valentina_32926
Aug. 6, 2009, 02:03 PM
I think the hauling in is a SUPER idea. I'd even bet that some of the saddle owners would allow you to ride in it (I would if I was there and my saddle is a Verhan - Pretty pricey).

Maybe offer $5.00 to test ride or if that gets pricey perhaps swap something (chores, something you could make rather inexpensively - e.g. embroider their initials on a saddle pad, etc.). You might even luck out and find someone wanting to sell their saddle.

mbm
Aug. 6, 2009, 02:15 PM
Custom Saddlery is much less expensive <snip> and despite the name they have off the rack saddles ;) .

yes and you wont believe the number of people who think they are getting a custom made to fit saddle when they order a "Custom Brand" saddle.

in all honestly i think it is misleading and false advertising.

Blacktree
Aug. 6, 2009, 02:17 PM
Thanks so far everyone - this has been very helpful!


this is a superb site for explaining parts of the saddle,
http://www.trumbullmtn.com/Other_Pages/saddle_termgy/saddle_term.htm

Great site, thanks for the link. :)


I have paid between $100 (reflocking & adjustments) to almost $400 (more like a total rebuild of the whole underside of saddle - so semi-custom fit for horse). Definitely worth it if you like the saddle to begin with.

That's not too bad. Good to know!


Around here in central Oklahoma, the saddle fitting runs about $90, plus fitter's traveling expenses. When the saddle fitter came, he told me what brands of saddles will most likely work with my horses and what will mostly not work. In the past two years, I purchased one used Albion and two used County, and have them reflocked to fit my boys. I have been very happy with the result.

I think if my 'going to a dressage barn experiment' doesn't pan out, this is they way I'll go next.


And really I dislike any of those exchangeable gullet thingy. Think about it, an ideal tree will coform to your horse's back to provide even contact and elimiate pressure points. To make exchangeable gullet work, the tree itself has to be somehow in two pieces. And the edge of the two pieces of tree can cause extreme pressure.

I think that is exactly what was causing problems with the Isabell.


I think the hauling in is a SUPER idea. I'd even bet that some of the saddle owners would allow you to ride in it (I would if I was there and my saddle is a Verhan - Pretty pricey).

Maybe offer $5.00 to test ride or if that gets pricey perhaps swap something (chores, something you could make rather inexpensively - e.g. embroider their initials on a saddle pad, etc.). You might even luck out and find someone wanting to sell their saddle.

That's kind of what I was hoping for. :)

DebbieB
Aug. 6, 2009, 02:29 PM
I use an American Flex delrin panel saddle. It will fit every horse I put it on in any state of muscular development, even if they are unevenly muscled. The sweat patterns always are full and even, plus the weight bearing area is greatly increased from a regular hard tree. The delrin panels are mounted to a regular tree on a ball joint at the front so they conform to any shoulder shape (table back or narrow). The back attachment has a slot so that the panel can shorten/bend when the horse bends. The panels distribute the rider/saddle weight and are flexible enough to allow the shoulder blade freedom of movement.
You can find used saddle or the newest models here: http://www.hillviewfarms.com/

I see no reason why a person should go through dozens of saddles to find one that has limited fit for a horse or horses. Get the tree that your butt likes with the delrin panels that fit every horse you ride.

Blacktree
Aug. 6, 2009, 02:44 PM
Is your stallion still growing? If he is, I suggest you find a "second best" saddle that you can work with for now, but start saving your pennies and when he has finally finished growing at about 7 or 8 years of age, then go to Schleese and get him a purely customized saddle built specifically for him and for you.

That's actually where we are now. When I got him, my dressage saddle didn't fit him - so I sold it. He was still growing and changing so much that I didn't even look into getting a new one until last year when he turned 7 and seemed like he was finishing (I've just been using my jump saddle in the meantime). In the end, I probably will end up trying to save for something like a Schleese, because you are so right that w/ a stallion, it is even more important that he is be able to move and show himself as best as possible. But for now, I'm hoping to get that 'second best' saddle that will work for a while until I can afford that final step.


You mentioned that there was a saddle that seemed to work but sit rather on the low side? That's because it is wide, but you said it seems like he likes it.

I don't think he likes it, it just sits more balanced on him than most saddles. He's such a good boy, unfortunately he doesn't complain much if things aren't working, just gets sore. It does look like it could work with that foam pad to uniformly lift it up, but I was so upset to see his muscles look like that - I don't know if I should even try that or if I should move on.


My boy put on another 1/4 inch in height in the spring of his 8-year-old year, plus additional bone. So, just kinda keep that in mind. Some warmbloods grow a very, very long time.

Wow, that is a long time. And my guy has definitely been a late bloomer, I will keep that in mind.


Take a good firm feel of your horse's back and feel for the spinous processes tips under the muscle mass. Mark the widest point of each one with a felt pen. If you find some are wider than others, these are the ones you have to pay particular attention to. Draw a line down your horse's back connecting the dots, and measure the width at the widest point. THIS is the width you want for your gullet.

Very interesting. Didn't realize that, thank you.

Gloria
Aug. 6, 2009, 03:04 PM
You know it just occurs to me why on earth is custom made English saddle so pricy? A couple of years ago we purchsed a Billy Cook custom western saddle for my husband and his belgain x quarter horse for under $2000. I mean it was complete custom made with custom tree made by Billy Cook himself.

We hauled the horse to Billy Cook's shop, Billy Cook came out to look at the horse and decided we needed a custom tree. The widest tree they had was too narrow for this boy... I remember Billy was grumbling about "draft horses are not riding horses". lol.

mbm
Aug. 6, 2009, 04:56 PM
why are custom english saddle so pricey? because people will pay it..... and when one saddle maker ups their price - everyone has to do it otherwise they lose "cred" and people will think their saddles are no good.

Bobblehead
Aug. 6, 2009, 05:04 PM
I was actually thinking of approaching a trainer at one of our local dressage barns and asking if they would be willing to have me pay to haul my horse in and try any of their student's saddles on him that are willing to let me (under their supervision of course). I don't even need to ride in the saddles, I just want to be able to go to one place and put a bunch of saddles on him - to get a feel for a brand/model could work for us (w/o all the delay of doing this one at a time by mail). Has anyone tried anything like this before, or is this idea pretty 'out there'?



I have actually done this. It was at my own barn and was at my trainer's suggestion. I can't tell you how educational and helpful it was to be able to compare them one after another, sometimes going back to a previous one and looking at it again. I didn't have the major problems you've had, but also I was a lot less knowledgeable. I think it shortened my search quite a bit. But I do think you absolutely have to at least sit in a few of the saddles yourself, and by all means ride for at least 10 minutes if you possibly can. I think most people won't mind as long as you take excellent care of their saddle for those few minutes.

HollysHobbies
Aug. 8, 2009, 03:51 PM
I'm doing that now--trying everyone at the barn's saddles. The only way to buy a saddle is to ride in it.

Another vote for a Luc Childeric. Sounds like it might work for your horse...I had an Andalusian in on trial for 3 months--crazy, hard to fit conformation...short backed, EXTREMELY shark withered yet round and flat backed, very broad shouldered...I couldn't BELIEVE my Childeric fit her. All the other saddles we tried (Passier, Lauriche, 2 different Crosbys) were an utter disaster...making weird snapping sounds as she walked and wouldn't stay in place.

Good luck. Saddle shopping's a beast.

Risk-Averse Rider
Aug. 8, 2009, 04:27 PM
I use an American Flex delrin panel saddle. It will fit every horse I put it on in any state of muscular development, even if they are unevenly muscled. The sweat patterns always are full and even, plus the weight bearing area is greatly increased from a regular hard tree. The delrin panels are mounted to a regular tree on a ball joint at the front so they conform to any shoulder shape (table back or narrow). The back attachment has a slot so that the panel can shorten/bend when the horse bends. The panels distribute the rider/saddle weight and are flexible enough to allow the shoulder blade freedom of movement.
You can find used saddle or the newest models here: http://www.hillviewfarms.com/ This web site makes my eyes hurt.

Seriously - if these people want to be taken seriously, they need to get a professional web designer/developer to work with them on their site.

I was interested in learning about these miracle saddles, but not at risk of bringing on a migraine.

</rant>

fatorangehorse
Aug. 9, 2009, 01:33 PM
Whenever anyone expresses interest in my saddle or shares a story like yours, I happily offer them to try mine - which I am inlove with by the way. I can't imagine people would mind particularly since you are just looking for horse fit. I would connect with someone @ the farm - trainer or rider - so that you are not cold-calling them.

I would think most would be sympathetic to your plight . . .

Good LUCK!

Goo
Aug. 9, 2009, 04:34 PM
I’m on BI. If you’re willing to haul to my barn (I think my BO charges a $10 arena fee, but would have to double check), then you’d be welcome to try my Hennig on your horse. If it works for him, you can probably find one in very nice used condition for $2500, plus (bonus!) Hennigs have adjustable trees.

I believe there is also a Schleese on the premises - not sure what model it is and it is definitely older. I’m not wild about how it looks for the average modern WB back - the panels are rock hard and curved (not good for a flat back - your horse's back looks similar to my horse's, with a long wither and flattish back behind the wither), BUT I can find out if you could try that as well.

Most of the other saddles at my barn are pretty much Wintec Isabells I think, as the resident trainer seems to prefer those saddles for her students. There might be a couple old Rooslis, though (those have curved panels/trees), I believe a Prestige (also curved panels/tree), and maybe an old Passier or two. I think there’s a Neideruss too, but it probably has a narrow tree because it was used on an uber narrow withered TB. I’m not sure yet whether you’d be able to try any of the other aforementioned saddles, but I think I could definitely get you into a Roosli as well because I think at least one of the Rooslis belongs to BO (who is a friend of mine).

If this interests you, I'll send you my email address. :)

SpecialSue
Aug. 10, 2009, 12:28 PM
I've had saddle fitters out to the farm to fit my stallion and many of the saddles I already own 'appear' to fit him well - but he HATES them. Particularly the Passiers - that I love to sit in. I bought an Ansur treeless dressage saddle while I was on my hunt and that worked well for him but I'm not 100% comfortable in it - the 'button' hits me in the wrong spot.
I tried saddles of all of my friends too and found the following: He liked the Stubben Tristan (I hate it) and he liked the Prestige Andrea Pallidio - this model is no longer being made so I looked for a used one that had similar serial numbers to the one I had tried. I found one and while it doesn't look like the one I tried (size wise) when they are side by side looking at the bottoms - he likes it and so do I.
My horse is 16:0hh and 1000# with clear but not large withers. From this experience I can tell you that he wants clearance over his withers. The Prestige I found is a 32cm regular panel 17" seat. The gullet is narrower than the one that I tried before I bought this one but he is happy with it and the saddle pad shows that it fits too.
I like your idea of going to a dressage barn and seeing if they will let you try saddles. Another idea might be to go to a dressage show that has a big vendor group. Our local dressage group's shows usually have two large tack vendors with many saddles both new and used to try. I found my saddle through by googling 'Prestige Andrea Palladio Dressage Saddle'. Of course at that point I knew what I wanted. That said, my google returned a lot of great sites selling used saddles and I thought the prices were reasonable.
I hope this helps.

Blacktree
Aug. 12, 2009, 02:41 PM
I’m on BI. If you’re willing to haul to my barn (I think my BO charges a $10 arena fee, but would have to double check), then you’d be welcome to try my Hennig on your horse. If it works for him, you can probably find one in very nice used condition for $2500, plus (bonus!) Hennigs have adjustable trees.

If this interests you, I'll send you my email address. :)

Yes, that would be great! Definitely send me your email, I'd love to take you up on your offer... :)


I've had saddle fitters out to the farm to fit my stallion and many of the saddles I already own 'appear' to fit him well - but he HATES them. Particularly the Passiers - that I love to sit in.

I went through that with my old competition horse - a saddle would look like it fit, and I'd like it, but he'd HATE it. Then the ones that I hated, he would like. :lol: And here I thought with our stallion, I'd have fewer problems!!


My horse is 16:0hh and 1000# with clear but not large withers. From this experience I can tell you that he wants clearance over his withers.

Yes, that's how I would describe his back, clear but not large withers. He's not got 'shark fin' withers, but he still seems to really want clearance.

I think the hardest thing about fitting this guy has been that he tries so hard to be good, even if a saddle is making him sore. My old horse would tell you in about 3 steps if a saddle wasn't right (helping me know which ones 'looked ok' but actually weren't), he was very opinionated and clear about saddle fit. But with this guy, I think things are going to be a bit harder to figure out. Thank goodness his jump saddle fits at least!

Ibex
Aug. 12, 2009, 02:48 PM
Since you're in the PNW, try calling Regal Saddles in Victoria BC. They're $$$ new, but sometimes they know who has ones for sale (used seems to be about $2k), and can refit them for $200-$300.

I have a used one that's been adjusted to fit two adult horses I leased and now my youngster, and I couldn't be happier... Just be sure to get a wool flocked one!

thatmoody
Aug. 12, 2009, 05:05 PM
We are in Florida, but would be happy to let someone do something like that, as long as they paid the arena fee and signed the insurance waiver. We have something like 20 saddles on premises, ranging from my Verhan, my trainer's Legacy, a Wintec Pro, and a bunch of others. Tree sizes from XW to MW and different lengths, so we have a good representation.

So yes, I think that's pretty reasonable. But a saddle fitter would be better - my trainer is a fitter, but doesn't reflock, so I'm getting ready to call a fitter myself as my saddle is overdue...

retrofit
Aug. 12, 2009, 08:31 PM
A picture is worth a thousand words. The web site is in German, just scroll down to the picture of the saddle from the front & you will see what I mean.

http://www.sadelmagasinet.se/product.asp?product=537

slc2
Aug. 13, 2009, 10:05 PM
There are so many saddles for sale now, used that it is just incredible. A little cruise down ebay, there are all sorts of very nice saddles out there. I just took a cruise there looking for a Verhan saddle, and found a pretty amazing selection of used top quality saddles, everything from Passier to Spirig.

You can even get the serial # of a custom made saddle, and write to the maker and get the measurements/modifications done and see if a specific used custom saddle will fit your horse.