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2DaPoint
Aug. 4, 2009, 04:44 AM
Fine..... deleted.

Guin
Aug. 4, 2009, 06:52 AM
"Iwas pretty ruthless about getting to talk to somebody two years ago, and basically forced an interview upon the person who was in charge of things at that time."


Wow. I wouldn't hire you either. This is what HR and the Athletic Department is saying about you right now: "You've got to be kidding, it's her again. She was such a know-it-all, pushy, PIA. She refused to go through our appropriate hiring channels and here she is AGAIN." Get a clue: University HR offices DO read each application that is submitted online. It can take up to six weeks for them to get back to potential candidates, and harassing the staff with countless emails and phone calls does NOT advance your cause. If they are interested, they will contact you. And they do not have the time or inclination to respond to every candidate with an evaluation of why you didn't get the job.

If I were in charge of hiring and found out about this post, you'd be blackballed not only from the SMU program, but any other collegiate position anywhere. Grow up.

Windswept Stable
Aug. 4, 2009, 07:15 AM
I was pretty ruthless about getting to talk to somebody two years ago, and basically forced an interview upon the person who was in charge of things at that time.


Seems like they may have a "memory" of you in their files.

elctrnc
Aug. 4, 2009, 09:07 AM
If the position is filled, I would like to know that.

And then I would like to know the reasons behind why I was not considered as a candidate for the position.

And I came to COTH to say so because word most certainly gets around on here........

What is the point of your post? To find out whether the position has been filled? To "bad mouth" SMU? To let others know that you applied and hope others can get info on why you were "not considered as a candidate" (if SMU has indeed already made a choice)?

I have very rarely heard of anyone being given the "reasons" why that person was not considered to be a candidate for a certain position. In the real world, if you are chosen for an interview, then you will be informed whether you received the position. If there is no interview, there is rarely any communication.

I agree with Guin. Yikes.

Mara
Aug. 4, 2009, 09:13 AM
There's that memory of the previous experience, and there's another angle to consider. It may not apply in the case of a private university, but I know the state schools are REQUIRED to post notice of open positions and actively solicit applicants. Very often they have already made their decision, and are just going through the motions in order to comply.

cyriz's mom
Aug. 4, 2009, 09:17 AM
KD,

As a friend, you need to delete this post. It's not going to get you any answers and it doesn't reflect on you favorably. I can understand your frustration, but isn't the way.

Besides, I thought the NCAA coaches weren't supposed to have other clients?

2DaPoint
Aug. 4, 2009, 09:33 AM
KD,

Besides, I thought the NCAA coaches weren't supposed to have other clients?

It certainly hasn't stopped other NCAA coaches in Texas who I know personally from doing just that.

Thanks for the advice.
KD

2DaPoint
Aug. 4, 2009, 09:43 AM
Seems like they may have a "memory" of you in their files.

The person with whom I spoke at that time is no longer with the college.
And my "interview" was, unbeknownst to me, AFTER the other coach had already been hired.
I found out about the new coach from a member of the team....

If they have a memory of me, then they should know that I am still very serious about my interest, and that the facility owners where I am still working who have offered to host the team are equally as serious in their interest.

2DaPoint
Aug. 4, 2009, 09:46 AM
It may not apply in the case of a private university, but I know the state schools are REQUIRED to post notice of open positions and actively solicit applicants. Very often they have already made their decision, and are just going through the motions in order to comply.

Yes, I was told that they are REQUIRED to post the position on their website, and that all applicants must apply on line.
I did that.
I watched that website like a hawk for weeks after they told me they would be posting it.

You know, I haven't actually checked to see if the posting now says "Filled".

thatmoody
Aug. 4, 2009, 09:46 AM
There's that memory of the previous experience, and there's another angle to consider. It may not apply in the case of a private university, but I know the state schools are REQUIRED to post notice of open positions and actively solicit applicants. Very often they have already made their decision, and are just going through the motions in order to comply.

Yes, often this is the case, and I would suspect that it applies here. Often the decisions are already made when the job is posted. We have have "emergency" positions, however, where that posting requirement can be waived. It applies if the job becomes vacant too close to the beginning of the semester and must be filled before the semester begins. In that case, the administration can waive the formal search process and just go ahead and hire someone.

2DaPoint
Aug. 4, 2009, 09:55 AM
She refused to go through our appropriate hiring channels and here she is AGAIN." University HR offices DO read each application that is submitted online. It can take up to six weeks for them to get back to potential candidates, and harassing the staff with countless emails and phone calls does NOT advance your cause. If they are interested, they will contact you. And they do not have the time or inclination to respond to every candidate with an evaluation of why you didn't get the job.

I did go through the appropriate hiring channels.
On the advice of several very savvy business people, I followed up my application, resume, and cover letter with conservative phone calls and conscientious emails.
Since I had already had some casual communications with the woman with whom I "interviewed", I chose to press that suit.

I didn't get that excited this time. Just the on-line application, and a few brief follow up emails.
It's been well over six weeks.

My point is that even big corporations have the very standard, "Thank you, but, NO." form letters that they send out to the rejects.
Even a reject letter would be appropriate at this point.
Then I CAN stop making an a$$ of myself with my continued efforts.

Fine, blackball me, but TELL ME SO.

zahena
Aug. 4, 2009, 09:59 AM
As someone seeking a job in the "real world" of business, I have received a communication of some sort for each position that I have interviewed for or applied for. I would think SMU could extend a similar interest.

Sometimes the more hungry you are for it, and the harder you push, the further it pushes you away from what you want.

I'm a big believer in everything happening for a reason. While it sometimes sucks for us that we don't get what we want, in the grander scheme of things we can sometimes see the benefit of NOT getting what we originally wanted.

elctrnc
Aug. 4, 2009, 10:00 AM
My point is that even big corporations have the very standard, "Thank you, but, NO." form letters that they send out to the rejects.
Even a reject letter would be appropriate at this point.


Did you have a formal interview? If not, then a rejection letter is not considered "very standard."

2DaPoint
Aug. 4, 2009, 10:01 AM
What is the point of your post?
To find out whether the position has been filled?
To "bad mouth" SMU?
To let others know that you applied?

Question number 1: Maybe.... Sure..... Yes!
Question number 2: Not the entire college, no, just their particular hiring protocol.
Question number 3: Well, sure, there's that.

thatmoody
Aug. 4, 2009, 10:11 AM
Oh, and FYI, I work for a university, but not this university, and am familiar with their hiring practices. You rarely hear anything if you're not short-listed for an interview. Not particularly courteous, but in this job market, unfortunately all too common.

Lucassb
Aug. 4, 2009, 10:24 AM
This is the most publicly on-purpose thing I have ever posted on here.

Oh, I have said plenty of accidentally public things on here, but this time I'm being quite purposeful in my statements.

SMU is looking for a Coach for their Equestrian Team. Again.

I have applied for the position. Again.

I really reallly want the job. Again.

I applied two years ago, too, when they were looking for their first "real" NCAA Coach.

I have Collegiate riding AND Coaching AND Administrative experience to add to my "normal" skills and experience as an Instructor and Trainer in Hunter/Jumper and Dressage.

I was pretty ruthless about getting to talk to somebody two years ago, and basically forced an interview upon the person who was in charge of things at that time.

Because, let me tell you, their Public Relations department, or Human Resources department, (or whomever) was, and continues to be, positively inaccessible and evasive.

This time around, I have done all that was officially asked of me in terms of applying on line, etc., have followed up with emails to both the Director of the Athletic Department and his second-in-command, but have otherwise chosen a more demure tactic.

Return emails from those gentlemen, one of which was an automated out-of-office reply, said they should be well under way with the hiring process by mid-July.

Consequent attemtps to remind them of my interest, and to offer further information on my credentials, have met with complete silence.

Even if I am the poorest choice on the planet for the position, (which I can assure you I am not), shouldn't SOMEBODY have returned my attempts at communcation by now?

I guess I am just shocked that an acedemic and athletic power-house like Southern Methodist University would have such an inadequate correspondence protocol.

Especially since they are looking to hire someone that is a bit out of the ordinary when it comes to experiences and skill sets within the Collegiate Athletic world.

Like I said, I'm very disappointed because I really want the opportunity to present my case to the Athletic Department in person.

If the position is filled, I would like to know that.
And then I would like to know the reasons behind why I was not considered as a candidate for the position.

And I came to COTH to say so because word most certainly gets around on here........

Wow. :eek:

I can totally understand being disappointed about not getting a job you thought you were well qualified for... but whatever your riding/training skills are, to be honest I think they've very likely been overshadowed by a fairly incredible lack of tact and appropriateness.

By your own admission, you circumvented their published application process and behaved "ruthlessly" to force an interview with the decision maker at the college when the job first became available. Unsurprisingly, it did not work - people don't want to work with someone who behaves that way, particularly in academia - and now you are being publicly critical of their lack of personal response and failure to adhere to what you consider the appropriate correspondence protocol. I think what you've done here is actually the opposite of what you intended - you've made it clear that SMU made a reasonable decision in passing you over.

In addition to teaching and training, remember that a coach is a representative or ambassador of the school they serve. To function successfully in such a position, you would need to demonstrate a great deal of professionalism and maturity that would model appropriate behavior to students (not to mention potential sponsors, donors etc.) You've done pretty much the opposite.

Plenty of us have had the experience of putting forth a lot of effort to apply somewhere without getting much in the way of an acknowledgement ... that is just an unfortunate reality of the hiring process. Many, many places - particularly those that offer positions that have a lot of prestige attached to them - simply receive too many applications to be able to respond personally to each one of them. Doesn't mean that it isn't a bummer to the applicants, but it's a business reality. Unless you are one of the final candidates competing for a position, hiring firms do not usually give you a critique on why you did not get the job...and sometimes even the unsuccessful finalist doesn't get that feedback either. Hiring firms aren't career counselors. Don't take it personally, and try not to advertise spite.

Saying something like, "I am really disappointed I didn't get an interview for this job. I really felt my 20 years of experience producing winning junior riders that went on to be happy, well adjusted adults would have served the program well, and supporting such a great university program would have been a dream come true..." might have made someone take a second look.

Berating the hiring managers in public for not bowing to your demands ... not so much.

Trixie
Aug. 4, 2009, 10:30 AM
I was pretty ruthless about getting to talk to somebody two years ago, and basically forced an interview upon the person who was in charge of things at that time.



Even a reject letter would be appropriate at this point.
Then I CAN stop making an a$$ of myself with my continued efforts.

You do know that a lot of places don't send rejection letters, right? Some just don't have the staff or time to bother. Sure, that's unfortunate, but it's the way it is. I don't think I've ever gotten a rejection letter from a job that I formally interviewed for.

You'd probably do better to stop "making an a$$" of yourself by badmouthing prospective employers on a website that you know darn well will be read by tons of people. It looks crazy and makes you look look a bad risk to hire, even for other employers. The horse community is small.

zahena
Aug. 4, 2009, 10:30 AM
Looks like they announced this just yesterday.

http://smumustangs.cstv.com/sports/w-equest/mtt/schoolfield_haley00.html

I can sympathize because I was in a similar situation with my dance and was strung along by the head dancer for months. In frustration I vented on a public forum that touched off a series of some not-too-nice e-mails. She was (and still is) a close personal friend and our relationship recovered. It wasn't her choice, it was the management's choice. She was mearly the messenger.

I've auditioned several times since only to be turned away on a lame excuse. I can completely relate to being "black-balled" as I'm sure my past experience keeps me away and now that I see how they have treated their dancers, I'm happy that dust has formed on my costumes!

fair judy
Aug. 4, 2009, 10:52 AM
Yes, I was told that they are REQUIRED to post the position on their website, and that all applicants must apply on line.
I did that.
I watched that website like a hawk for weeks after they told me they would be posting it.

You know, I haven't actually checked to see if the posting now says "Filled".

looks like someone should have done her homework before they went ballistic on a forum in the wee hours of the morning. :cool:

i was almost disappointed that you deleted what promised to be a tirade. glad someone copied it so i could enjoy. :eek:

yes, COTH is a small world, and if you have any sense you should beg "lucasb" to delete that post. your diatribe certainly might follow you as you attempt to move up the ladder.

2DaPoint
Aug. 4, 2009, 11:33 AM
Looks like they announced this just yesterday.

http://smumustangs.cstv.com/sports/w-equest/mtt/schoolfield_haley00.html


Thanks for all the educational replies.

thatmoody
Aug. 4, 2009, 12:20 PM
looks like someone should have done her homework before they went ballistic on a forum in the wee hours of the morning. :cool:

i was almost disappointed that you deleted what promised to be a tirade. glad someone copied it so i could enjoy. :eek:

yes, COTH is a small world, and if you have any sense you should beg "lucasb" to delete that post. your diatribe certainly might follow you as you attempt to move up the ladder.

Academia is a TINY world, and it's entirely based on networking and word of mouth. It's very different from the business community in that personal relationships can mean more than credentials in some cases, because getting things done involves so much red tape that NOT having these connections to grease the wheels can make things impossible. Those who are successful at forming and maintaining relationships know that an aggressive, business-type approach is VERY off-putting in this culture.

It's almost like going into a far-eastern culture, where you absolutely have to know the culture of the institution before you approach someone. For instance, before approaching a potential contact, I would have a mutual acquaintance introduce us. It sounds horribly convoluted, but when you're dealing with such scare resources as academic dollars, it pays to build relationships rather than barnstorming...

RioTex
Aug. 4, 2009, 12:24 PM
I also work for a University, although not a private facility. We only notify those that are called for interviews, not the entire pool. FYI.

SillyMe
Aug. 4, 2009, 02:31 PM
Hey, 2dapoint, now it looks as if TCU is looking for an assistant coach...go for it!

zahena
Aug. 4, 2009, 02:41 PM
Am I the only one slightly cheesed off that it falls under women's sports? i mean, I get that mostly women ride but there are MANY wonderful male riders in our area that would be a welcomed and powerful force on an equestrian team.

I'm sure this dicussion has been raised before but it just bugs me a little. *pulls on pollyanna braids and skips off*

dove
Aug. 4, 2009, 02:45 PM
Am I the only one slightly cheesed off that it falls under women's sports? i mean, I get that mostly women ride but there are MANY wonderful male riders in our area that would be a welcomed and powerful force on an equestrian team.

I'm sure this dicussion has been raised before but it just bugs me a little. *pulls on pollyanna braids and skips off*

In order for it to be NCAA, it must be a women's sport. NCAA doesn't have any unisex teams I don't think. Helps with the whole title IX thing too.

Fun Size
Aug. 4, 2009, 03:00 PM
The OP has been deleted so I can't address that...but I can address the rejection letter issue.

I'm an attorney and I've been unemployed for awhile. I've sent out hundreds of resumes, and of those I think I've received maybe 3 "we didn't select you" letters out of that pool. There are just too many job hunters for employers to do that anymore. If it has affected attorney positions that much, I'm sure others are affected just as much or more!

ExJumper
Aug. 4, 2009, 03:09 PM
Am I the only one slightly cheesed off that it falls under women's sports? i mean, I get that mostly women ride but there are MANY wonderful male riders in our area that would be a welcomed and powerful force on an equestrian team.

I'm sure this dicussion has been raised before but it just bugs me a little. *pulls on pollyanna braids and skips off*

If it's an NCAA sport it's going to be for women only. Plus, the only reason many schools would pay for it at all is because it adds another woman's sport for Title Nine.

If it's a club sport, men could ride on the team. Many schools have both club and Varsity teams.

zahena
Aug. 4, 2009, 03:17 PM
Oh gotcha. So what if a boy wanted to join this team? Would it throw everything totally off? I don't really understand this that much because I never rode when I attempted to go to college.

findeight
Aug. 4, 2009, 03:21 PM
The OP has been deleted so I can't address that...

Page1 post #16 quoted in full (no doubt in response to an increase in controversial posts being deleted when the response is not what was expected). Nothing ever disappears in cyberspace.

Always better to wait until you cool off before having at something or somebody. You can sabotage your future because it is just too small a world to assume nobody who may have an impact on your future will ever see it.

dove
Aug. 4, 2009, 03:47 PM
Oh gotcha. So what if a boy wanted to join this team? Would it throw everything totally off? I don't really understand this that much because I never rode when I attempted to go to college.

They can't. It's like a woman trying out for Men's Soccer. Men can ride on at schools with club teams, as another poster said. I guess it's too bad for the boys that want to ride at schools with NCAA teams but I can't imagine it's the end of the world for them.

2DaPoint
Aug. 4, 2009, 05:21 PM
Page1 post #16 quoted in full (no doubt in response to an increase in controversial posts being deleted when the response is not what was expected). Nothing ever disappears in cyberspace.


I attempted to delete my post solely on the advice of a friend.

Mayaty02
Aug. 4, 2009, 05:35 PM
I am in HR and I can tell you I get calls and emails every day all day from candidates and frankly there are not enough hours in the day for me to do my job, which includes interviewing, contact with hiring managers, reference checking etc, and call everyone back who calls me. I do respond to all emails because I can normally do that while multitasking on a phone call etc. I want to add though, there is nothing that will turn an organization off from a candidate more than disrespecting the HR dept. One negative word from me and my hiring managers will not interview a candidate, even if they were referred by another employee.

Please understand that we do want to get back to everyone but when you get hundreds of resumes coming in every day, it can be tough. I definitely agree with following up, however there is a fine line between following up and being too aggressive and disrespectful.

Janet
Aug. 4, 2009, 05:38 PM
My point is that even big corporations have the very standard, "Thank you, but, NO." form letters that they send out to the rejects.
Not in my world they don't. Only if you had an interview with the hiring manager.

zahena
Aug. 4, 2009, 05:58 PM
I will say I have been on interviews where they had 500+ resumes and they still managed to send me a thank you but no e-mail. I've also had plenty of companies that I didn't even remember applying to send me a thank you but no e-mail. And let's be real, 500+ people are not applying to SMU.

Not defending it, but wouldn't that be a great way to get someone off your case??? Sorry, job is filled, thanks for applying. Try again later.

Janet
Aug. 4, 2009, 06:00 PM
I will say I have been on interviews where they had 500+ resumes and they still managed to send me a thank you but no e-mail. I've also had plenty of companies that I didn't even remember applying to send me a thank you but no e-mail. And let's be real, 500+ people are not applying to SMU.

Not defending it, but wouldn't that be a great way to get someone off your case??? Sorry, job is filled, thanks for applying. Try again later.
Yes, but you got as far as an interview.

flshgordon
Aug. 4, 2009, 08:43 PM
Just wanted to offer my appreciation for the applicant that DID get the job. She is a class act and I'm sure will do a great job!:yes:

InWhyCee Redux
Aug. 4, 2009, 08:53 PM
[QUOTE=2DaPoint;4282335

My point is that even big corporations have the very standard, "Thank you, but, NO." form letters that they send out to the rejects.
[/QUOTE]

Not if the secretary/receptionist/assistant whose job it was to send out all those letters got laid off six months ago, and the person whose job it is now is already working ten hours a day and has no time to promptly address, print, sign, seal, and stamp all those form letters.

As someone who has been in the position to hire people, people who ruthlessly bull their way in (repeated cold calls, dropping by the office unannounced, mass mailings) have the deck stacked against them.

dghunter
Aug. 4, 2009, 09:04 PM
My Dad works at a University with an Undergrad population of about 25,000 students. I was curious on this topic and he works in human resources so I asked him :) He said that they do not send out rejection letters for people who fill out an application. He said with the amount they get it's simply impossible. They do let applicants know where they can go to see the status of the position.

2DaPoint
Aug. 4, 2009, 09:41 PM
Well, as a matter of fact, I did get my generic rejection letter via email today.

I also had a nice, personal "Thanks, but no" from the gentleman who is second-in-command.

And to the local girl who is a recent college graduate and assistant coach for one of their rival schools, and was the best applicant from their nation-wide search, I wish nothing but the very best.

Interesting that the position of Hunt Seat Coach at her former school is now available....

fair judy
Aug. 4, 2009, 10:09 PM
just Cannot let it go, can you? seriously, peace out.:cool:

Sithly
Aug. 4, 2009, 10:13 PM
And to the local girl who is a recent college graduate and assistant coach for one of their rival schools, and was the best applicant from their nation-wide search, I wish nothing but the very best.

Interesting that the position of Hunt Seat Coach at her former school is now available....

Classy. :rolleyes:

findeight
Aug. 4, 2009, 10:16 PM
Snide insinuations about the successful applicant when you were passed over can come back and bite you later.

And they look like 6th grade gossip girls right now.

karenrrafuse
Aug. 5, 2009, 01:22 AM
Snide insinuations about the successful applicant when you were passed over can come back and bite you later.

And they look like 6th grade gossip girls right now.

Ya, you'd make a great role model for the team.

2DaPoint
Aug. 5, 2009, 04:37 AM
Classy. :rolleyes:

WHAT?????? !!!!

I really DO wish her the very best of luck because she will obviously be fighting her way through University bureaucracy.
I actually do know the gal and have even commented and complemented her on the way her students ride.
Is she really the BEST candidate from the NATION? Who knows?
Obviously the people at SMU think so.

And I DO think it is interesting that he former college is now looking for a coach for their team.

I remain disappointed with SMU's correspondence techniques and policies during hiring.
I am extremely disappointed that I was not given a chance at an interview.
I am only mildly pacified with the very terse communications sent to me AFTER the position was filled.

Contrary to what most of you on here have assumed, I was never rude in any of my attempts at correspondence with the hiring staff.
I was not aggressive in any of my wording or in the frequecy of my inquiries.
I was able to stop by two years ago and have a face-to-face discussion with a real person, and the fact that I then called it a "forced interview", is just unfortunate.
I will, quite possibly, forever regret the fact that I went on a public forum to voice my frustrations and disappointments.
I had forgotten what a feeding frenzy can erupt on this forum when the right chum is thrown out.
THAT has been my biggest mistake.

Guin
Aug. 5, 2009, 06:48 AM
Well, DUH. She left her previous position to become the coach at SMU. No [surprise] it's now vacant. What is your point, exactly? You continue to shoot yourself in the foot every time. Now you've blown any chance at possibly applying for that vacant position. :rolleyes::rolleyes:

Madison
Aug. 5, 2009, 08:48 AM
WHAT?????? !!!!

I really DO wish her the very best of luck because she will obviously be fighting her way through University bureaucracy.
I actually do know the gal and have even commented and complemented her on the way her students ride.
Is she really the BEST candidate from the NATION? Who knows?
Obviously the people at SMU think so.

And I DO think it is interesting that he former college is now looking for a coach for their team.

I remain disappointed with SMU's correspondence techniques and policies during hiring.
I am extremely disappointed that I was not given a chance at an interview.
I am only mildly pacified with the very terse communications sent to me AFTER the position was filled.

Contrary to what most of you on here have assumed, I was never rude in any of my attempts at correspondence with the hiring staff.
I was not aggressive in any of my wording or in the frequecy of my inquiries.
I was able to stop by two years ago and have a face-to-face discussion with a real person, and the fact that I then called it a "forced interview", is just unfortunate.
I will, quite possibly, forever regret the fact that I went on a public forum to voice my frustrations and disappointments.
I had forgotten what a feeding frenzy can erupt on this forum when the right chum is thrown out.
THAT has been my biggest mistake.

Wow, just wow. You just don't get it. It is one thing to be confident in your abilities, but you have gone way beyond that and are consistently conveying a "how dare they choose anyone but me, and how dare they not fall all over themselves communicating with me after the fact" attitude that is deluded and unrealistic. They owed, and owe, you nothing. Your disappointment in SMU's hiring practices seems to be based on unrealistic and exaggerated expectations, not any shortcomings on their part. You now say you got a letter AND an email after the fact, but yet are still making derogatory comments about their "correspondence techniques and policies during hiring" -- do not kid yourself into thinking this kind of chip on your shoulder or entitlement theory or whatever it is will not show through in some way in your communications with prospective employers if you don't adjust your expectations to something more realistic. If you really are qualified and the right person for a job like that, you need to have an "oh well, on to the next one" attitude and just keep applying til the right fit comes along and let it go.

Renn/aissance
Aug. 5, 2009, 08:55 AM
Your sense of entitlement, your attitude towards not getting this job, and your vindictive public snarking reminds me more of a student than of someone interested in teaching them. Good luck to you.

RioTex
Aug. 5, 2009, 09:37 AM
Although I can't speak to SMU's hiring policies, I know that with ours (Texas State in San Marcos), if you do not meet ALL of the required criteria, even if you sound great, you will not be eligible for an interview. The job posting I saw indicated that previous collegiate team experience was required.

Have you applied at TCU? If you accept a position with one of the NCAA programs, there is a segment of the population that you cannot coach in other capacities. Lots of NCAA recruiting rules to follow. I know because I ride with an NCAA coach. She isn't even supposed to communicate with girls between this age and that or can be accused of recruiting violations. I'm so old that she can teach me. :)

fair judy
Aug. 5, 2009, 09:47 AM
"Contrary to what most of you on here have assumed, I was never rude in any of my attempts at correspondence with the hiring staff.
I was not aggressive in any of my wording or in the frequecy of my inquiries.
I was able to stop by two years ago and have a face-to-face discussion with a real person, and the fact that I then called it a "forced interview", is just unfortunate.
I will, quite possibly, forever regret the fact that I went on a public forum to voice my frustrations and disappointments.
I had forgotten what a feeding frenzy can erupt on this forum when the right chum is thrown out.
THAT has been my biggest mistake."

---------------------------------------------------------

YOU threw the chum, and now you are whining about it? sad that you apparently did not have someone in your own life to turn to for a little help in dealing with this rejection. the fact that you had to use a public forum to express yourself speaks volumes.

i would do a really intensive examination of my conscience if i were you. a little humility and some penitance ...........

ExJumper
Aug. 5, 2009, 10:57 AM
Wow. I've been one of a few top candidates -- top 3 -- at a number of (non-horse) jobs. But by the luck of the draw I haven't been offered any of the positions.

Does anyone know where I can find a message board to rant and rail and bitch and moan about that?

dghunter
Aug. 5, 2009, 11:39 AM
Wow. I've been one of a few top candidates -- top 3 -- at a number of (non-horse) jobs. But by the luck of the draw I haven't been offered any of the positions.

Does anyone know where I can find a message board to rant and rail and bitch and moan about that?

:lol::lol:

zahena
Aug. 5, 2009, 12:10 PM
Wow. I've been one of a few top candidates -- top 3 -- at a number of (non-horse) jobs. But by the luck of the draw I haven't been offered any of the positions.

Does anyone know where I can find a message board to rant and rail and bitch and moan about that?

Haha! I'm in the same boat. Sadly I'm yet to find a public forum only friends who tell me some [edit] excuse like be thankful for the temp job you have now with no benefits and not PTO. For longer than your last "real" job.

Maybe we should start a thread..... :lol: It could start with what idiots employers are and end with how our friends can shove it when they try to blow sunshine up our butts.

YankeeLawyer
Aug. 5, 2009, 12:24 PM
Interesting that the position of Hunt Seat Coach at her former school is now available....

There you go - you can apply for that post then. ; )

One of the most amusing job rejection stories I have heard was of the law student who received a rejection letter from a law firm that had, at the bottom, the draft line "kissoff.doc" . Apparently the firm had saved that form document under that name and someone had forgotten to remove the draft line before sending. But my favorite part of the story? The student had never applied to that firm in the first place!

zahena
Aug. 5, 2009, 12:29 PM
OMG!!! I love it!!! A pre-emptive kiss off letter!

Trixie
Aug. 5, 2009, 12:29 PM
But my favorite part of the story? The student has never applied to that firm in the first place!

You know, I got rejected from medical school.

Interestingly, I never applied to medical school, nor was I qualified to at the time.

They DID send me a formal rejection letter, though. :lol:

2dapoint, you definitely just.don't.get.it.

MintHillFarm
Aug. 5, 2009, 12:37 PM
I am of the opinion that your attitude does not lend itself to teaching at the college level.
I would carefully re-think the way you have handled this situation the next time you covet a position. You didn't present yourself in the best light this time around.

trubandloki
Aug. 5, 2009, 12:51 PM
You know, I got rejected from medical school.

Interestingly, I never applied to medical school, nor was I qualified to at the time.

They DID send me a formal rejection letter, though. :lol:



They probably knew that you had a thought once about maybe applying so they thought it best to let you know that you were not qualified at that time.

:yes: :winkgrin:

tothepointe
Aug. 5, 2009, 12:52 PM
Wow.....

All I can hope is that no one mistakes me for you since our usernames are so alike.....

Cita
Aug. 5, 2009, 12:56 PM
You know, I got rejected from medical school.

Interestingly, I never applied to medical school, nor was I qualified to at the time.

They DID send me a formal rejection letter, though. :lol:

2dapoint, you definitely just.don't.get.it.

Hey! Maybe you got one of my BF's sister's med school rejection letters!

She applied to about 15 schools, and there were at least 4 that just never responded one way or another. 1 sent out a rejection letter after the fall semester had already started! :lol: (She got in somewhere else and is very happy now, if anyone cares! ;))

Madison
Aug. 5, 2009, 01:00 PM
There you go - you can apply for that post then. ; )

One of the most amusing job rejection stories I have heard was of the law student who received a rejection letter from a law firm that had, at the bottom, the draft line "kissoff.doc" . Apparently the firm had saved that form document under that name and someone had forgotten to remove the draft line before sending. But my favorite part of the story? The student has never applied to that firm in the first place!

Hilarious. The girl who at the time was #1 in my law school class got a rejection letter that said "unfortunately, it is a numbers game we must play" -- we were all a little confused as to which number they were looking for if not #1 :lol:

Trixie
Aug. 5, 2009, 01:10 PM
They probably knew that you had a thought once about maybe applying so they thought it best to let you know that you were not qualified at that time.

Well, at least they let me know formally in writing :lol: Otherwise, how would I ever know?

trubandloki
Aug. 5, 2009, 01:45 PM
Well, at least they let me know formally in writing :lol: Otherwise, how would I ever know?

They probably tried to send it back to you using thought waves, just how they learned of your interest, but your inbox was full or something. That required them to send a formal letter. :yes:
It is probably a good time for you to think about cleaning out your ESP in box when things like this start appearing at your house.

Nickelodian
Aug. 5, 2009, 02:14 PM
She isn't even supposed to communicate with girls between this age and that or can be accused of recruiting violations. I'm so old that she can teach me. :)

Now I'm thinking that's just her way to get out of lessons with teenage girls! lol ;)

slp
Aug. 5, 2009, 08:16 PM
In ANY sport at the NCAA level, if you aren't already an assistant coach for a team at a comparable school they would not even consider you for a head coaching position.
Unless it was basketball or football, and you were coming from coaching in the NBA or NFL. :lol:

dghunter
Aug. 5, 2009, 09:48 PM
In ANY sport at the NCAA level, if you aren't already an assistant coach for a team at a comparable school they would not even consider you for a head coaching position.
Unless it was basketball or football, and you were coming from coaching in the NBA or NFL. :lol:

What if you're George Morris? :lol::lol:

Prime Time Rider
Aug. 5, 2009, 11:07 PM
An observation about this post and thread; just because you don't receive an immediate response to your job application/resume doesn't necessarily indicate that the employer isn't interested. Last year I applied for a job for which I met all of the qualifications and for which I was well qualified. I followed up with an email or two expressing my interest in the position and never was contacted for an interview or received a rejection letter. Six months later the hiring manager called me for an interview and I was eventually hired. Evidently, the candidate the company had originally offered the position declined the offer, and it was a protracted process. Had I stupidly vented my frustrations with this employer in a public forum do you think they would have offered me the job? Grow up and realize that a) life isn't fair, b) you can't always get what you want, and c) sometimes things work out after all, but not on your terms!:cry:

2bayboys
Aug. 6, 2009, 12:54 PM
WHAT?????? !!!!

I really DO wish her the very best of luck because she will obviously be fighting her way through University bureaucracy.
I actually do know the gal and have even commented and complemented her on the way her students ride.
Is she really the BEST candidate from the NATION? Who knows?
Obviously the people at SMU think so.



OP, the people at SMU are the only ones whose opinions matter in this issue. For whatever reason, you are not attractive to them as a potential employee. You snarked about that and the readers on this board were instantly clued in as to why you might not be attractive as a college-level coach.

But your veiled swipes at the successful candidate are ticking me off. :mad: You either don't know that what you are writing makes you sound like a whiny mean child, or you don't care because you still believe that your amazing wonderfulness entitles you to say whatever the hell you want.

You were rejected. Get over it. Trust me, it won't be the last time.

Quinn
Aug. 6, 2009, 01:53 PM
You were rejected. Get over it. Trust me, it won't be the last time.[/QUOTE]

Zing...

http://community.webshots.com/user/ballyduff

GettingBack
Aug. 6, 2009, 10:41 PM
My husband once got a rejection letter a year after he had applied at a place. We giggled, because we had forgotten he even applied.