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grandprix123
Aug. 3, 2009, 04:32 PM
I posted a video of me riding in Feb. and I got tons of great hints and suggesstions so I was wondering if any one wanted to critique some of our more recent trips. Since feb, Id say we've become very connsistent and our errors are more minor then before. The first video is us schooling at the Chagrin Valley Hunter Jumper Classic from like a month ago.
http://www.facebook.com/video/video.php?v=99736673173


Heres a round from MI (Video camera died durring my good week, so we ordered them but they havent come yet) Sorry about the first few seconds being shakey. Any Suggestions or ideas would be greatly appreciated as were not showing again for a month. thanks!
TIA

ETA: Watching the video I see that im slouching and rounding my shoulders.

drmgncolor
Aug. 3, 2009, 05:28 PM
No critique, but you might want to either post the public link to the video or upload it on youtube. I had to log into FB to view the video and not everyone has FB.

grandprix123
Aug. 3, 2009, 05:36 PM
Sorry Im gonna sound stupid but is there a public way to post a video? Im working on getting them on youtube but its taking like 3 hours each

KateKat
Aug. 3, 2009, 05:37 PM
Oy, you need a new camera person. That was really distracting...

But what I could tell, I thought it looked good. Love your horse, looks nice to ride!

drmgncolor
Aug. 3, 2009, 05:52 PM
Sorry Im gonna sound stupid but is there a public way to post a video? Im working on getting them on youtube but its taking like 3 hours each

You know, I am not sure about a video. I know for pictures there is a link at the very bottom of the page. I haven't ever been able to upload video to FB because it times out. I usually start the upload to youtube and then walk away for a while.

I am not qualified to give you a critique and I am too chicken to post one on here of me. :) I do love your horse's coloring!!

dghunter
Aug. 3, 2009, 08:35 PM
Lovely horse :) Love that show too :yes:

grandprix123
Aug. 4, 2009, 12:31 AM
heres the seccond round from MI.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1uKElEkZaCw&eurl=http%3A%2F%2Fwww%2Eyoutube%2Ecom%2Fmy%5Fvideo s%5Fedit&feature=player_embedded

Thanks in advance

Hauwse
Aug. 4, 2009, 04:34 PM
heres the seccond round from MI.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1uKElEkZaCw&eurl=http%3A%2F%2Fwww%2Eyoutube%2Ecom%2Fmy%5Fvideo s%5Fedit&feature=player_embedded

Thanks in advance

First I am going to commend you on an absolutely beautiful turn-out. Your horse looks incredible, and your attire is perfect for the class. Love it!!

O.K. Critique time. When you first trot out, my thought was why is this person seeking a critique, you looked like a medal contender, your horse was balanced and moving out like a flat class winner.

Then the canter started, and I was a little surprised. As soon as you started the canter your whole body started pumping, you jumped every fence for your horse, and your horse went from balanced to on his front end.

I would suggest that you work on balance, that same feeling you get from the entry trot you should get once you pick up the canter.

You are not in a two point but you are riding like you are, either you need to sit, sink and move your horse forward with your seat and leg, or you need to two point and move your horse off a solid steady leg, until he is in the bit and on his hind-end.

From an equitation standpoint (at the canter) you need to really lock your lower leg in and use it, don't be passive, be balanced with your horse, and use that leg to make sure he is balanced and on the bit. I know its a hunter class and you probably want to give the impression it is effortless, but just the opposite happens, it looks contrived and lacking something. The best expression of this is that you are constantly increasing pace to find a spot, and it is very noticeable, if your horse was balanced and in the bit little adjustments to pace are almost imperceptible. If you were balanced your horse would have more impulsion, and would come off the ground at once. In the video his/her jump looks segmented, or sticky. Not what you want in a hunter class or equitation class. The reason it looks this way is because he/she is on his/her front-end.

You absolutely need to learn to let the horse jump and you go with it. In the video your little jump only adds to the perception that the horse is segmented, and that you are not completely with them. This is really evident in the landings where you need to snap your body position open because you closed it up too much over the fence by jumping with the horse. I would hazard to guess if you got the right impulsion, and you waited this would all be eliminated instantly. The changes would also eliminate the lead issue as it appears that it is the result of you looking for a spot and pushing for it and your horse saying I had a spot picked until you asked for stuff two strides out.

I feel like this may come off as very critical, and if so I apologize, but the reason I am being so blunt is that I think you have excellent potential as a classical american type rider, the kind that can win medals and can put down a hunter course that is fluid and seamless. Point in case you have excellent hands, the hardest thing to teach a rider.

Really at the end of the day I don't have all that many criticisms as they are all based on two simple things, balance/impulsion, and letting the horses jump position you, not you helping the horse jump, he/she needs no help.

Can't say anything about the horse, love the horse.

P.S. when you transition to the walk from a trot, you horse still needs to be balanced, don't let them fall to a stop on their front-end, a personal pet-peeve of mine, and if I was judging a EQ or hunter class you would be marked down for that.

grandprix123
Aug. 8, 2009, 05:12 PM
Thanks for all the suggestions! I thought I would be able to learn more by posting my alright courses. I would definetly agree that there is too much upper body movement going on in the course from traverse. Also our walk transitions need alot of work he tends to go into appalosa western pleasure mode. Since these shows, Ive been able to ride alot more of the horses at my barn, and Ive found that my leg stays much stiller when I ride the rounder wbs then on the slimmer tb types like my horse. Thanks for the comment about potential, I actually plan on moving up to the big eq in the future and my true goal is in the equitation ring. Thanks!

Dakotawyatt
Aug. 8, 2009, 05:45 PM
First I am going to commend you on an absolutely beautiful turn-out. Your horse looks incredible, and your attire is perfect for the class. Love it!!

O.K. Critique time. When you first trot out, my thought was why is this person seeking a critique, you looked like a medal contender, your horse was balanced and moving out like a flat class winner.

Then the canter started, and I was a little surprised. As soon as you started the canter your whole body started pumping, you jumped every fence for your horse, and your horse went from balanced to on his front end.

I would suggest that you work on balance, that same feeling you get from the entry trot you should get once you pick up the canter.

You are not in a two point but you are riding like you are, either you need to sit, sink and move your horse forward with your seat and leg, or you need to two point and move your horse off a solid steady leg, until he is in the bit and on his hind-end.

From an equitation standpoint (at the canter) you need to really lock your lower leg in and use it, don't be passive, be balanced with your horse, and use that leg to make sure he is balanced and on the bit. I know its a hunter class and you probably want to give the impression it is effortless, but just the opposite happens, it looks contrived and lacking something. The best expression of this is that you are constantly increasing pace to find a spot, and it is very noticeable, if your horse was balanced and in the bit little adjustments to pace are almost imperceptible. If you were balanced your horse would have more impulsion, and would come off the ground at once. In the video his/her jump looks segmented, or sticky. Not what you want in a hunter class or equitation class. The reason it looks this way is because he/she is on his/her front-end.

You absolutely need to learn to let the horse jump and you go with it. In the video your little jump only adds to the perception that the horse is segmented, and that you are not completely with them. This is really evident in the landings where you need to snap your body position open because you closed it up too much over the fence by jumping with the horse. I would hazard to guess if you got the right impulsion, and you waited this would all be eliminated instantly. The changes would also eliminate the lead issue as it appears that it is the result of you looking for a spot and pushing for it and your horse saying I had a spot picked until you asked for stuff two strides out.

I feel like this may come off as very critical, and if so I apologize, but the reason I am being so blunt is that I think you have excellent potential as a classical american type rider, the kind that can win medals and can put down a hunter course that is fluid and seamless. Point in case you have excellent hands, the hardest thing to teach a rider.

Really at the end of the day I don't have all that many criticisms as they are all based on two simple things, balance/impulsion, and letting the horses jump position you, not you helping the horse jump, he/she needs no help.

Can't say anything about the horse, love the horse.

P.S. when you transition to the walk from a trot, you horse still needs to be balanced, don't let them fall to a stop on their front-end, a personal pet-peeve of mine, and if I was judging a EQ or hunter class you would be marked down for that.


This is a really great critique. I agree, you really look like a winner and your horse is incredible. There's lots of good potential. One good exercise I thought I'd throw out there to help improve your balance is the "double post" exercise. At the trot, sit for 2 beats, then stand for 2 beats all the way around the ring. The stand part is the hard part, and it will help you find your "center" and get your heel steady and underneath you, as well as encourage your leg to wrap more effectively around your horse. Keep up the good work!:winkgrin:

grandprix123
Aug. 29, 2009, 05:02 PM
for anyone that has fb: I have two more rounds that I posted, and was wondering if anyone would critique them as well. Both rounds won out of 30ish at AA shows, But my equitation is pretty stinky.

I havent shown or jumped him in a month and have been working alot on other peoples horses without stirrups, double posting, and worked my own horse alot in the two point to strengthen up my legs.

Were going to all the finals in the fall, and Im doing everything and anything to improve my riding by then, as Id love to be succesful there with him. any tips or suggestions? Thanks!

http://www.facebook.com/video/video.php?v=122768303173&ref=mf

and



1st ones up on youtube now:

http://www.facebook.com/video/video.php?v=122821293173

kellyb
Aug. 29, 2009, 05:35 PM
I LOVE your horse. How is he bred?

grandprix123
Aug. 29, 2009, 05:59 PM
I LOVE your horse. How is he bred?

All we know is that hes an Appaloosa TB cross