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Ted the Peep 'Ho
Jul. 30, 2009, 11:20 AM
I'm an OTTB who can really kick up his heels and go. But there were issues in my past, and I've always kind of favored my right hip, so it's weaker. My mom does that as well (I mean, she favors HER right hip, but that means she favors mine too).

She has been working very hard the past four years with a trainer at a new barn. At first I was like, sigh, you know - I've seen barns come, I've seen 'em go, trainers as well. But this one - oh, this one is different.

So we have been working very hard on self carriage for both my mom and me. Finding our cores, using them correctly, lightening up our front ends. My mom spends a lot of time at a microscope and computer, and she's just so tight, you know? Not mobile! I mean, I can move just a few muzzle hairs or one ear, but she can't always disconnect her leg from her arm.

She has been getting better. She does Pilates, she practices her lessons with me, she thinks about this stuff. But, you know, she's no natural athlete. And I loff her, but sometimes, well, a lot of times, she is SO slow on the uptake.

So...do you have any tips to help her be more light and mobile? Her core is a lot stronger, she is far more aware of imbalances or crookedness or even when she is blocking with just one part of her body. But knowing and fixing...two different things. And it's not like I could do a buck every time she blocks or holds to give her the tipoff. I mean I could, but I wouldn't.

Her trainer says that this is what is the big issue for her. Lots, lots of improvement (and you can see that in me as well). But she wants to be able to do what is needed to really help me move correctly, and she just gets stuck.

So, if you have any ideas, and can spell them out in words of maybe one or two syllables so I could explain it to her (like I said, I loff her, but sometimes she is so slow), I would be really grateful. And I bet, so would our trainer!!!

egontoast
Jul. 30, 2009, 11:26 AM
Your 'mom' would be a horse, right, or was your sire into some weird stuff?

Ambrey
Jul. 30, 2009, 11:31 AM
http://www.janesavoie.com/positionlanding/

DressageGeek "Ribbon Ho"
Jul. 30, 2009, 12:31 PM
I'm his mom, egontoast. Not too many horses I know spend time at a computer or microscpe...though if you know of any, I'll be happy to have them in my lab! That is, if the university would allow...

blackhorsegirl
Jul. 30, 2009, 01:17 PM
Are you safe as a longe horse? Get your mom into those longe lessons. They're good for balance, good for the seat, and just plain good all around. It's the place to work without stirrups and feel secure. At the Spanish Riding School, riders work 2 years on a longe. It is not for the fainthearted.

Carrera
Jul. 30, 2009, 01:42 PM
Yoga. Its done wonders for me!!

SillyHorse
Jul. 30, 2009, 02:00 PM
Your 'mom' would be a horse, right, or was your sire into some weird stuff?
You took the words right out of my uh, keyboard! :lol:

Gloria
Jul. 30, 2009, 02:04 PM
Second vote for Yoga. Perfect mesh with Pilate.

Druid Acres
Jul. 30, 2009, 03:09 PM
Dear Ted,
I'm going to go in a different direction here. Is it possible that your mom is starting to "over-think" things? She could perhaps be thinking so hard about being "blocked" that she forgets to just "ride forward" and have fun.

Maybe she could take a lesson or two on a schoolmaster so she can just relax and concentrate on "feeling" and not think so much? Can she audit some really good clinics so she has a good mental image of an "unblocked" rider to strive for?

I dunno, just a thought. Good luck to you both!

DressageGeek "Ribbon Ho"
Jul. 30, 2009, 03:19 PM
These are helpful ideas! My Pilates studio is also starting yoga classes, so I am going to try them out. I also have the book (Yoga for Equestrians) - went to a yoga teacher, had a private lesson where she worked with me, did the stretches for a while...and then..um, I didn't.

My trainer also suggested riding other horses - which will happen in Sunday's lesson to start.

And yes, I overthink!!!!! It is my curse. In science, you niggle niggle niggle, even if you do it in batch mode, and then the answer formulates and you know how to design the experiment or interpret the result. With horses, when you overthink...you can lose your bridle in the dirt!

I appreciate the suggestions (probably Ted appreciates them more!). I'm at a good place now where things are really starting to mesh, and I want to keep that going.

charlieo
Jul. 30, 2009, 05:19 PM
I started T'ai Chi about 2 years ago - have made fantastic progress (for me,as I'm not a natural athlete) since. The slow controlled (well most of the time) movements help, as does the balancing one must do. I find it extremely beneficial for riding, not to mention mental/spiritual well being.

slc2
Jul. 30, 2009, 06:24 PM
lots of riding and lots of lessons.

nhwr
Jul. 30, 2009, 06:29 PM
what charlieo says

I have been practicing yoga for about a dozen years. In the last few I have changed my perception of it from stretching to something more dressage-like. Instead of practicing an individual posture in isolation, I practice combinations of postures and focus on the quality of the transitions between the postures (sound familiar?). This has done a lot for me in terms of strength, balance and suppleness as well as given me a whole new appreciation of what we are asking of our horses. I feel that my ability to move naturally with the horse has really improved.

I have recently started t'ai chi and have found similar benefits.

ambar
Jul. 30, 2009, 06:37 PM
Find yourself an ART practitioner (http://www.activerelease.com/). Mine has done amazing things for my riding.

DressageGeek "Ribbon Ho"
Jul. 30, 2009, 06:51 PM
nhwr, that is very helpful - what I was trying to ask for, but without your eloquence! I also have some info re T'ai Chi and bookmarked some sites, will check that out as well. ambar - my Pilates instructor does something similar - T'ai Chi massage - is this the same, do you know? But that also helps.

If nothing else, this will literally help me become a more balanced person!

BaroquePony
Jul. 30, 2009, 08:08 PM
Many, many miles of trails with hills and water ... where you get tired enough to quit wasting any energy beyond the slightest nuance for guiding your horse. It (equitation) doesn't have to be perfect, but the miles will get you to flow with your horse as if you were the horse. Then go back and polish the dressage and develop your finesse.

Bayou Roux
Jul. 30, 2009, 08:32 PM
Ted--
Have mom read this:
http://www.amazon.com/Balance-Movement-Achieve-Perfect-Seat/dp/1570763305/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1249000060&sr=8-1

and remind her that, for the person, it's a lot more about the ability of the body to return automatically to a balanced neutral position than about holding positions through strength. (You, Ted, will need both the neutral and the strength. Sorry, you're the beast of burden.)

Remind mom that, sometimes, as people strengthen, they strengthen crooked, or off-balance postures, which make it hard for guys like you to stay balanced underneath them. Give her the chance to take a break from core-strengthening to check and make sure she's got core-straightening accomplished first. She'll like the week off from the pilates in favor of the passive stretching!

And then tell her to give you a peep for being so helpful!

J-Lu
Jul. 30, 2009, 10:52 PM
Dear Ted,

I can relate. My horse's massage therapist is a certified person massage therapist and she is the best I have ever experienced. She simply laid her hands on my back and knew that I strained my neck forward at work (I use a microscope) and extended my right arm out too much (reaching for the confocal microscope mouse which was waaaaaaaay to the right of the system). It was amazing. Since she worked on my horse when my horse was stiff, she could find the commonalities between my body and hers.

For your mom:

My massage therapist highly suggested spending alot of time during work hours stretching my shoulders and neck back and doing basic stretches to keep my mobility. A few minutes but frequently during the day. She told be to be much more aware of my posture (which is generally good but is being influenced by the amount of microscope work I do). I rearranged my microscope set-up and chair so that I don't crane into the microscope - I sit up to look. I changed the mouse and keyboard position. I changed my computer setup. It has helped ALOT. I also stretch on a regular basis-even at work (in between readings or things). I always stretch before riding.

As faculty, I bet that you get a free class per semester. Take a basic ballet class. It strengthens the heck out of your legs, core and arms and teaches you to use each independently of each other. Excellent posture is a result.

Longe lessons also help isolate arms from legs but only if they are not typical longe lessons. I find that people isolate their bodies when made to. So on a longe line, drop the reins (longe in side reins) and with your right hand work on touching your right hip, then your left hip, then left shouder, then horse's right hip, his crest etc, your opposite knee/thigh. Learn how to move your upper body and arms independently and together to do all sorts of things without changing your position below the waist. This can be fun if you have a fun person longing you. Another exercise is to use a water bottle. Hold it out to your side and see how you have to sublty change your weight in order to keep your horse balanced under you. Don't hold it out and "count to 10", move it hand to hand, front and back, sip out of it, in a fluid way to train your body to balance on top of your horse while the balance is constantly changing. Again, a fun person longing you makes this fun. The purpose of this is to loosen people up who tend to be stiff or to pose, all while keeping them aware of how they are balancing on their horse.

All of this put together helps you use your ankles, calves, knees, thighs, core, shoulders, arms, hands independently. It FEELS wierd at first, but that's fine! Inside rein releases also help to solidify the idea that the reins function independently.

Video taping is worth a thousand words. My friends and I used to video each other during most clinics. At the very least it helps your brain see what you are doing "God I'm stiff" or "Geez, I'm leaning forward" or "Lordie, my hands never move with my horse". This is perhaps the greatest gift you can give yourself. :) At least that is the case for me!!

In addition to the great Yoga advice, I'd suggest STRETCHING and maybe finding a GOOD massage therapist who is knowledgeable about horses, riders, and professionals who use keyboards for a living. (Yes, I know, Torrey Jeanes in Houston is perhaps the only person on earth with this background but she really turned my horse and me around).

BTW, I am loving UNC. I feel sane again.

Ted, please print out and give to your mom.

J.

PS. Get your mom to ride a true schoolmaster...or get a good trainer on you... feel is also worth a thousand words.

Heit
Jul. 30, 2009, 11:04 PM
I have a weak right side also, the program your position from Jane Savoie and Ruth Poulson has helped me align my body with good images. Great self help.


http://www.janesavoie.com/positionlanding/

YankeeLawyer
Jul. 30, 2009, 11:17 PM
I actually think swimming laps helps a lot, if your mom happens to have access to a pool.

Lolly
Jul. 30, 2009, 11:59 PM
I understand oh-too-well what your mom is going through. Riding without stirrups works like magic for me. Remove feet from stirrups, disengage overthinking brain, and just ride. Then pick up stirrups and marvel at the change that has occurred. Repeat as often as necessary, which in my case means pretty much every ride.

Hampton Bay
Jul. 31, 2009, 12:07 AM
Are your muscles stiff? If so, you might benefit from a Mg supplement just like many horses do. I know I ride much better if I put a pinch of epsom salts in my chocolate milk a couple times a day. It also helps me to warm up at the trot and canter on a long rein, active trot and canter, in a half seat. Posting the trot like that and staying up out of the saddle makes my muscles a bit more tired so they cannot tense up quite as easily. Plus the very active trot gets you moving more, so it loosens up my joints.

DressageGeek "Ribbon Ho"
Jul. 31, 2009, 09:44 AM
THANKS for all the terrific suggestions! I appreciate all the thoughtful replies.
Some I have implemented - regarding the scopes, we try and make everything as ergonomic as possible. Alas, none of the stereozooms (we use for genetics) are terrific this way - for some reason, Olympus and other manufacturers don't realize you can spend 3-4 hours a day between dissections and genetics. Or more. But we've done what we can (the common use scopes I have to put up with what the tall [male] people in the department have set up, as we have to play to the majority, after all).

My trainer has gotten on Ted (the very first one to do so), and I have ridden without stirrups (but will do more). She also has e do the sorts of exercises J-Lu mentioned - but again, I obviously need more. Riding other horses, including schoolmasters, is now on the list (yes, yes, we've talked about it, but I always felt that Ted and I as a team needed the work more, but now the time is upon me). Bayoux, I've looked at the book and wondered - so thanks for the link! I have some Jane Savoie as well, and Sally Swift, and Mary Wanless...but the reading and then correctly implementing is the key.

Thanks all!! I have a good plan now, I'll let you know how we progress.

Last night, all I focused on was being mobile, and not meeting resistance with resistance. Not easy, but we did take some steps forward.

CatOnLap
Jul. 31, 2009, 12:26 PM
I would just like to know how you got your horse to type without smashing the keyboard to bits.

Our neighbour was concerned that we were not putting in a septic field for our barn. I told him we had thought about it, but every time we tried to get the horses to flush their toilets, they smashed the handles off.

YankeeLawyer
Jul. 31, 2009, 12:30 PM
I would just like to know how you got your horse to type without smashing the keyboard to bits.

Our neighbour was concerned that we were not putting in a septic field for our barn. I told him we had thought about it, but every time we tried to get the horses to flush their toilets, they smashed the handles off.

You should get them Totos - the ones with the buttons.

CatOnLap
Jul. 31, 2009, 12:44 PM
good point.
Any clue where to find toilet seats big enough?

goeslikestink
Jul. 31, 2009, 12:59 PM
I'm an OTTB who can really kick up his heels and go. But there were issues in my past, and I've always kind of favored my right hip, so it's weaker. My mom does that as well (I mean, she favors HER right hip, but that means she favors mine too).

urm right handed riding then when ones crocked sometimes it what i call ride as write as often you tend to right stronger on one side that being the side your strongest on



She has been working very hard the past four years with a trainer at a new barn. At first I was like, sigh, you know - I've seen barns come, I've seen 'em go, trainers as well. But this one - oh, this one is different.

So we have been working very hard on self carriage for both my mom and me. Finding our cores, using them correctly, lightening up our front ends. My mom spends a lot of time at a microscope and computer, and she's just so tight, you know? Not mobile! I mean, I can move just a few muzzle hairs or one ear, but she can't always disconnect her leg from her arm.

still riding - on strongest side

She has been getting better. She does Pilates, she practices her lessons with me, she thinks about this stuff. But, you know, she's no natural athlete. And I loff her, but sometimes, well, a lot of times, she is SO slow on the uptake.

So...do you have any tips to help her be more light and mobile? Her core is a lot stronger, she is far more aware of imbalances or crookedness or even when she is blocking with just one part of her body. But knowing and fixing...two different things. And it's not like I could do a buck every time she blocks or holds to give her the tipoff. I mean I could, but I wouldn't.

give tell your mum to give on her strongest side then you will be more even and wont adavde her on the oposite side


Her trainer says that this is what is the big issue for her. Lots, lots of improvement (and you can see that in me as well). But she wants to be able to do what is needed to really help me move correctly, and she just gets stuck.

So, if you have any ideas, and can spell them out in words of maybe one or two syllables so I could explain it to her (like I said, I loff her, but sometimes she is so slow), I would be really grateful. And I bet, so would our trainer!!!


in conclusion-- give as in you give dressage geek ribbon ho
give on the side your strongest on then the horse will be even and you wont find you blocking him so much its a common riders errors that can easily be corrected

DressageGeek "Ribbon Ho"
Jul. 31, 2009, 01:22 PM
I think Ted uses a stick in his muzzle to press the keys. He's pretty resourceful!

stryder
Jul. 31, 2009, 01:24 PM
good point.
Any clue where to find toilet seats big enough?

are you saying her horse is a fat ass?:lol:

CatOnLap
Jul. 31, 2009, 02:45 PM
well, no, I meant my own horses, but since you mention it, can I start a thread from my horse titled "Does this rider make my ass look too wide?"

Ambrey
Jul. 31, 2009, 02:47 PM
well, no, I meant my own horses, but since you mention it, can I start a thread from my horse titled "Does this rider make my ass look too wide?"

There is a t-shirt I really wanted that has a horse saying "does this saddle make my ass look big?"

In many parts of Asia, they still use toilets that are, essentially, holes in the ground rather than raised things to sit on. I'd think those would be much easier for a horse to use.

stryder
Jul. 31, 2009, 02:58 PM
well, no, I meant my own horses, but since you mention it, can I start a thread from my horse titled "Does this rider make my ass look too wide?"

Uh Oh. Ted and Geek have asked a perfectly reasonable question, of a serious and thoughtful nature, and I have derailed it. I apologize.

Ambrey
Jul. 31, 2009, 03:03 PM
Sorry for helping- I offered my suggestion before adding to the derailment ;)

I think the concept of reducing position changes that are needed to keywords that one can repeat to oneself is a good one.

MyReality
Jul. 31, 2009, 03:04 PM
I will try to answer it based on my experience with adult students. Myself included.

First of all there are simply people who are less athletic. Meaning their muscles and body parts do not coordinate well, and don't get their jobs. i.e. if I tell you to point your hip bones down, you think very hard how to do it, but your body doesn't do it at all. This type of people needs imagery and visualization, to relate the riding directives with things they already can do and do well when not on a horse.

Then there are the left brained. I would fall into that category. I do well if you tell me what muscle to use, which not to sue. If a teacher tells me heels down, or relax the leg I would not be able to figure out how. You need to tell me, when the horse bounce up, allow the core muscles to lift and open the hip angle, etc etc. Then I get it.

Then there are people with poor muscle memory. This type of people simple repetition will do...but you need to encourage them to remind themselves, instead of pointing things out to them all the time.

Then there are people whose muscles interprets the information better than their brain. i.e. they over analyze the issue, fire 50 conflicting messages to their body. These students tend to ask a lot of questions, without being able to perform the task, then feel all sh!tty about themselves... the fact is the answers are right in front of them. These people need to not think, let the muscle do all the interpretation directly.

You need an instructor with eagle eyes, and not afraid to fix problems one at a time. Many instructors are focused on fixing the horse, and creating the wholistic package... many people just don't work that way.

DressageGeek "Ribbon Ho"
Jul. 31, 2009, 03:57 PM
well, no, I meant my own horses, but since you mention it, can I start a thread from my horse titled "Does this rider make my ass look too wide?"

*sigh* in my case, it's more a matter of, "Does this rider make my butt look small?"

DressageGeek "Ribbon Ho"
Jul. 31, 2009, 03:58 PM
Uh Oh. Ted and Geek have asked a perfectly reasonable question, of a serious and thoughtful nature, and I have derailed it. I apologize.

And I seconded the derailing, and I started the thread!

See? I can't keep my mind on serious riding!

equineartworks
Jul. 31, 2009, 04:02 PM
*sigh* in my case, it's more a matter of, "Does this rider make my butt look small?"

*snort*

I think I overheard Katie and Paco talking about this the other day. Katie is concerned that she will need to sport a "wide load" sign if we begin under saddle this summer. :(

hollyhorse2000
Jul. 31, 2009, 04:11 PM
You may have some sort of conformational issue or acquired inbalance that needs adjusting by a skilled craniosacral therapist. We have one in Maryland who works on all kinds of horse people and he'll do an assessment and say something like "when did you break your arm" and the answer is 30 years ago!! So all these little insults to our body contribute to make us crooked and enbed various bad habits into our riding

I'd also encourage horsey to get ridden by non-crooked rider because he (yes, you, Ted) are also falling into the pattern created by your rider and maybe enhanced by your own conformational challenges. (maybe horsie chiro might be in order).

stryder
Jul. 31, 2009, 04:29 PM
I think we think too much. IRL I am a computer jockey. I used to be fairly athletic, but I am, ahem, pre-Title 9, so even that didn't say much. Not like girls today.

At any rate, my brain has thoughts, and they flow out either my mouth or my fingers. The rest of me isn't too involved. Oh, sure, most days I can walk OK, and sometimes even chew gum, but I try not to get too complicated.

Ted, you and my big mare, are very reactive. Your muscles are hard-wired to react. You see "peep over there" and your hooves just head that way, and maybe throw in a happy buck or two on the way without any effort.

Well, your mom and I could never do that.

And I think, frankly, that most trainers, especially the really good ones, have VERY good connections between their brains and muscles. They think, "I want my horse to move that way" and their hands, legs and seat do what needs to be done without a whole lot of extra thought. They live in a physical world.

So I put people into two camps: those who live in their heads, and those who live in the physical world. Those living in the physical world find riding easier. I'm not saying a head-dweller can't become a good rider, I'm just saying it takes a lot more work than a body-dweller.

People like your mom and me, we have to focus on each hand, then on each leg, and the seat, too. Then the elbows creep forward. Oh, and remember to breathe, too, and relax because now we're trying so hard that it's difficult to just move with you. whew.

I think you should give her extra muzzle kisses because she's trying so hard to be good for you.

stryder
Jul. 31, 2009, 04:30 PM
*sigh* in my case, it's more a matter of, "Does this rider make my butt look small?"

Well, that would be my mare's question.

Ajierene
Jul. 31, 2009, 05:31 PM
I think, Ted, the problem is obvious.

You definitely suffer from a lack of the P vitamin....found only in peeps. Your mom needs to feed you more peeps, stat!

Ted the Peep 'Ho
Jul. 31, 2009, 06:25 PM
I think, Ted, the problem is obvious.

You definitely suffer from a lack of the P vitamin....found only in peeps. Your mom needs to feed you more peeps, stat!

And WATERMELON!!!

stryder
Jul. 31, 2009, 06:52 PM
And WATERMELON!!!

Ted, the notoriously fastidious CandiGirl prefers grapes over watermelon.

Ted the Peep 'Ho
Jul. 31, 2009, 07:16 PM
Ted, the notoriously fastidious CandiGirl prefers grapes over watermelon.

Yes, but she's a girl.

LJStarkey
Aug. 1, 2009, 05:31 PM
I would second the recommendation for ballet class -- though I would broaden it to all dance classes in general. Two years of jazz class isolations have done more for my riding than all the visualization I ever tried -- because they taught my muscles how to respond when I visualize.

And jazz class will make you work up a real sweat. Hip hop class does the same with EXTRA sweat, if you can stand the music.

DressageGeek "Ribbon Ho"
Aug. 1, 2009, 10:55 PM
Some of my fellow barn mates have done ballroom dancing.

mustangtrailrider
Aug. 2, 2009, 02:54 AM
Perfect solution:

Take Ted Dancing, which ever style he likes!

LOLOLOLOL

mustangtrailrider
Aug. 2, 2009, 02:54 AM
Perfect solution:Take Ted Dancing, which ever style he likes! LOLOLOLOL

ellebeaux
Aug. 2, 2009, 07:09 PM
Hey, I LOVE Hot Yoga. Here we have 3 different types of classes (see www.hotyoga.co.nz) that all serve different purposes.

I find doing the Yin class most soothing - the poses are held for 2-3 minutes at a time and you can really feel things stretching and realigning and blood flowing into areas that don't usually get a lot.

The more continuous flow classes are great for strength building and explosive movements which I like to believe would help my reaction time if a horse spooks!

I love the previous poster's analogy of yoga and dressage - that makes sense to me.

Right now, I definitely feel one-sided for a number of reasons - old rotator cuff injury, too much computer time, horse fall last spring. But in my upper body more than my legs.

The other thing that I think helped my seat a lot in the past was years of riding reining horses. I highly recommend that you try it! Getting on a really catty fast horse and responding to his movements taught me to keep my legs long and strong. Also I'm much more used to working off the leg. And I like to think that I'm better able to sit a spook, though I haven't really tested that theory yet.

Any excuse to get out of the lab, right?

DressageGeek "Ribbon Ho"
Aug. 2, 2009, 09:07 PM
We actually had an illuminating lesson today - as part of my "riding other horses" aspect, I rode one of my trainer's greenies - an Andalusian cross mare. She's the alpha mare in the herd, and has typical Andalsusian sensitivity. Very different from Ted: wide barreled, a bit shorter coupled, no withers - just very, very different all the way around.

And it's like being on a first date: I was very aware that she was a blank slate, very aware of how precise and clear I needed to be, very aware of how my position affected her, both on the ground and in the saddle. Now, I'm not saying that I rode perfectly, just that I was in "constant aware" mode, and thus quicker to adjust, and more mobile. With Ted, it's like being part of an older married couple: no need to impress, you just go on cruise control.
So right after I took care of the mare I groomed and saddled Ted - and how obvious it was that we played the "I pull you, you pull me" game. And while there were times I went on cruise control, many more times I said, "Oh - I'm here. I'm light. I'm forward. I don't play the pulling game." And how much he would open up and be forward, and connected.

So, we'll just keep doing things like that, and try out some of the other suggestions too. I'm checking into some of the books that were mentioned, and going back to read the Yofa for Equestrians and the T'ai Chi book as well. It's a start!

charlieo
Aug. 2, 2009, 09:17 PM
DG, my T'ai Chi instructor says that you really need to have an instructor to get the full benefits of T'ai Chi, and preferably a group setting. Videos help, but to get the most out of the form (like a dressage test, the pattern of moves one uses to meditate, stretch, etc) one must do it correctly, hence the need for feedback, and an instructor. I learn something every day, and really try to practice the five principals when riding. It really helps.

Whisper
Aug. 2, 2009, 09:57 PM
Other than vaulting, I've found partner dancing to be the most helpful for riding. It helps me relax and go with movement generated by someone else, and gets me out of analytical mode and more into my body. Yoga, tai chi, other martial arts, pretty much anything that helps give you a better sense of where your body parts are, coordination, core strength, flexibility, etc. are all great. :D There are a bunch of seat exercises you can do on a loose rein at the walk during warmup: http://www.ridepublishing.com/?action=search&loc=editorial&key=Respecting+the+rider&order_by=relevance&check_helper=manual&submit=Search

Gloria
Aug. 3, 2009, 11:19 AM
Dear Ted,

Your mom is so much like my mom!!! Those people who were trained in scientific fields simply don't understand the simple fact that 1 + 1 <> 2 (rolling eyes). sigh...

Oh and when are they going to learn that we will always be there when they get there, be it 1 day, 1 month, 1 year, or 1 decade? So would you tell my mom, and I tell yours, that do not be too hard on themselves? We understand that humans are slooooow learner but we know they love us and we really don't mind if they take 10 years to learn a simple leg yield.

Sincerely

HS.

DressageGeek "Ribbon Ho"
Aug. 3, 2009, 12:18 PM
Thanks for the links! and I'm looking for a T'ai Chi class in my area...maybe we can get someone to come to the barn.

Thanks again for the suggestions!

Ted the Peep 'Ho
Aug. 3, 2009, 12:21 PM
Dear Ted,

Your mom is so much like my mom!!! Those people who were trained in scientific fields simply don't understand the simple fact that 1 + 1 <> 2 (rolling eyes). sigh...

Oh and when are they going to learn that we will always be there when they get there, be it 1 day, 1 month, 1 year, or 1 decade? So would you tell my mom, and I tell yours, that do not be too hard on themselves? We understand that humans are slooooow learner but we know they love us and we really don't mind if they take 10 years to learn a simple leg yield.

Sincerely

HS.

My mom is so funny. She walked by me with Mystique, saying "Hey Ted! I'm dating another horse!" Like I cared. If Mystique was getting my treats, which I know she wasn't, then I'd care. Otherwise, I'm not stupid, I got to hang with Bow and Hershey the pony and graze away.

I think she finally got some decent halts yesterday. Maybe one good transition. She is very slow, but she is persistent.

But feeling guilty is good, because that means when she buys stuff at horse stores she gets me more treats.