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Merche2
Jul. 29, 2009, 07:09 PM
I know probably this has been discussed before, but, what breeds (pony) that is, would you guys considered suitable for dressage? Name a few :winkgrin:

I am pony shopping for my son and .. oh heck, for me too!!!

Dressage_Diva333
Jul. 29, 2009, 07:16 PM
German Riding Ponies are likely your best bet, or a nice Welsh cross... you have to be careful though, as many Welsh ponies tend to be a little too hunter-type. I like Connemara's quite a bit as well :yes:

If you find a NICE Haflinger, they do allright in lower levels. I used to have a Haflinger who averaged scores at around 65% at Training and First level, here are some photos of him:
http://www.secretambitionstables.com/mufasaofmf.htm

He is an "M" line, the other Haflinger line that tends to be nice is "W". I don't really like the "A" line at all.

Mallard
Jul. 29, 2009, 07:18 PM
I know probably this has been discussed before, but, what breeds (pony) that is, would you guys considered suitable for dressage? Name a few :winkgrin:

I am pony shopping for my son and .. oh heck, for me too!!!

Connemara!!!

slc2
Jul. 29, 2009, 07:24 PM
New Forest ponies, Connemara, Welsh crosses, Euro-warmblood-ponies.

It also depends. If a really young child just doing intro and having fun now and again, a very steady, reliable older pony that will take care of him is preferable. For a very ambitious, competitive, athletic, older child, a friskier, more active showy pony of the above breeds is a better fit.

goodpony
Jul. 29, 2009, 07:32 PM
Im not sure its so much a question of what breed as it is a question of what Type. Popular pure breeds are Welsh, Welsh Cob, New Forrest, Connemara, Halflinger Horses and all sorts of Cross Bred Riding Ponies (GRP for example).

mg
Jul. 29, 2009, 07:34 PM
<333 Connemaras! I grew up in HJ land and have managed to avoid becoming a DQ due to being a developing eventer now ;) so my preferences may differ from others...but I like TB crosses as well. I find that a lot of the sport ponies have TB in their lineage that helps refine them more. I have a TBxWelsh ATM and he looks like a mini warmblood. I also vote for Morgans :)

ambar
Jul. 29, 2009, 08:28 PM
A good 14.1 Arabian. :D

J-Lu
Jul. 29, 2009, 10:09 PM
What are your goals and the level of you and your son? Huntery-ish but solid citizens can easily beat fancy but hot ponies without worry of broken bones. Depending on your goals and the kind of experience you are planning to give your son, there are lots of pony options.

Welsh ponies can make great dressage ponies. Certain families moreso than others. Nancy Hintz at Yellow Rose Dressage trained a "clan" of welsh ponies through the levels and competed a few at FEI. I literally saw her get off a FEI pony in the warmup ring of a show...schooling FEI movements...and hand the pony over to a young kid who was showing training level. The pony totally changed his mode to suit the novice kid. Two or three of her kids and ponies were represented in the Jan Ebeling Jr/YR clinic in Region 9 last year. One was a GP level pony pleasantly doing third level work with a young boy. If you're really thinking Welsh, she might be able to give you some advice on bloodlines (she is an extremely honest and trustworthy horsewoman).

German Reit Ponies are also a great option but I will go out on a limb and say that many are suited to small adults more than kids. They can be energetic, smart, and waaaayyyyy too much pony for a kid.

Halflingers can do very well at lower levels and can be very pleasant.

My friend rides a paint mustang/welsh pony that came from a back yard in NM. She trains him with her 11? year old daughter. This pony is safe and sound and is already schooling upper level movements. She and her daughter show the pony to great success. They found this pony through networking and took a chance to go see him. You never know....

A small horse in the 15.0 hh and smaller size might be perfect for you and your son, too.

exvet
Jul. 29, 2009, 10:52 PM
The welsh that Nancy competed were primarily welsh cobs bred by Madoc Welsh. She did take a handful to FEI and earned her gold on a welsh cob stallion, Kentchurch Chime. There is also a welsh cob in the Pacific NW that has taken the dressage world by storm and is currently competing at I1. There are several other welsh cobs currently competing or have competed at FEI. Some are below 14.2 hands though the section D's have no upper height limit. I have welsh cobs competing in dressage ranging in size from 13 hands (section C) to 15.2 (section D). Having said that many prefer the lighter breeds which have been mentioned. Also, I have seen very, very few welsh cobs have hunter like movement unlike the section B welsh ponies. There are 4 sections of welsh. So if you are considering ponies, it's not a bad idea to get to know/understand what the 4 sections are and what they excel at as well as their height restrictions.

quietann
Jul. 29, 2009, 11:06 PM
Many Morgans are 14.2 hands or under. A nice sport-bred Morgan could be the ticket, depending on one's goals. They are smart and funny and tend towards easy-keeping and soundness, just like most pony breeds.

Janet
Jul. 30, 2009, 03:59 AM
Another vote from Connemaras and crosses.

At the Region III Connemara show this year we had 49 dressage rides, ranging from Intro (LOTS) to 3rd level. There are some well known Connemaras and crosses (e.g., Seldom Seen) that have competed at the very top levels. And there are lots of Connemars happliy carrying kids around at the lower levels. (Some of whom only do ONE dressage show a year, either doing show hunters or not showing at all the rest of the year)

The overall comment from the judge was "what a nice group of horses/ponies."

mandalea
Jul. 30, 2009, 04:32 AM
If you find a NICE Haflinger, they do allright in lower levels.

I know somebody who is doing higher level dressage in the UK, and doing wonderfully..

Here in Australia, you see more Welsh x's, Australian Riding ponies, New Forest ponies, Connermaras, TB crossed with something else, Quarter Ponies, Arabian-type ponies. Anything really.

This is our pony registry: http://www.apsb.asn.au/

Really, anything that is the right hight and temperament for him, he should do well :)

ise@ssl
Jul. 30, 2009, 06:16 AM
We have GRP's and own the GRP stallion Popeye and they are very suited to Dressage and jumping and move like a small WB. We also have GRP/welsh crosses and depending on the cross they have all started well in dressage -- though one is proving to be just a super jumper. We do find that too much Welsh and you might not get as much swing in the gaits.

As somone noted the GRP's do move forward but I wouldn't agree that they are all too much for a child. They are bred in Germany to specifically have good temperaments for children. There are always exceptions but that's true in all pony breeds.

We've had no experience with Connemara's though they are lovely and have much success in Dressage - the only issue is they do go over pony height more often than GRP or GRP/WELSH crosses.

We actually had done well with our "honies" the ones that go over. We have many women who want competitive smaller dressage partners that they can mount from the ground and train themselves. They've done the 17H WB thing and find they don't need a huge horse to be in the ribbons and enjoy their riding.

Nanerpus
Jul. 30, 2009, 08:14 AM
Pony Mix! The pony in my sig is 13.2, 1/2 Arab, 1/4 Welsh, and 1/4 Quarter horse and she is awesome!!!! I have also heard that New Forest ponies are great, but really there are SO many nice ponies out there, that you'll have no problem finding a nice one for your son and yourself:)

Valentina_32926
Jul. 30, 2009, 08:22 AM
Mobilehrs (on this BB) has an FEI pony and breeds ponies for dressage. Try PM'ing her if she doesn't respond to this BB entry. Her latest pony baby made me drool - VERY nice. Too bad I'm too tall for ponies.

exvet
Jul. 30, 2009, 08:48 AM
Here are a few examples of welsh cobs who compete in dressage. The following two are ridden by my son, daughter (13 & 16) though currently are competed by me. My kids have ridden them in schooling shows and competitive trail.

Section D welsh cob who currently compets at Prix St. George successfully (despite being built downhill). He is one of my taller ones at 15 hands. This picture was taken last weekend during a riding lesson.

http://i122.photobucket.com/albums/o253/ldarling_photos/Other/medium3.jpg


http://i122.photobucket.com/albums/o253/ldarling_photos/Other/medium4.jpg

This is a 14.1 hand mare, I'm schooling 2nd level, showing 1st (already qualified for championships). She has awesome half passes and already has her changes.

http://i122.photobucket.com/albums/o253/ldarling_photos/Other/DSC_0144.jpg

http://i122.photobucket.com/albums/o253/ldarling_photos/Other/DSC_0100.jpg

My children are too tall to ride this guy; but, I'm competing him at training level and schooling him at first. I fully expect him to be ready for FEI pony classes late next year. He's a section C welsh cob at 13 hands.

http://i122.photobucket.com/albums/o253/ldarling_photos/2009/IMG_0065.jpg

http://i122.photobucket.com/albums/o253/ldarling_photos/2009/IMG_0131-2.jpg

http://i122.photobucket.com/albums/o253/ldarling_photos/2009/IMG_0133.jpg

Here is one I just backed earlier this spring. He is 3, 14 hands and one I have high hopes for. I plan to start showing him next spring. This is one anyone can do anything with and definitely will be good for both children and adults (he's a tank so can carry even taller adults); but at this time he is not for sale.

http://i122.photobucket.com/albums/o253/ldarling_photos/2009/IMG_0050.jpg

http://i122.photobucket.com/albums/o253/ldarling_photos/2009/IMG_0141.jpg

If you are interested in exploring welsh cobs as an option I can give you some contacts of those who currently have a couple, trained welsh cobs who make it within pony height limits.

adelmo95
Jul. 30, 2009, 08:57 AM
I would say the more mainstream breeds that people think of are the welsh, new forest, grp's etc, but any breed with the right conformation and temperment can do dressage. I have a little 14 hand quarter pony mare who was an unlikely dressage candidate but has turned into an awesome little dressage pony because she will try her heart out to do what is being asked of her.

Sakura
Jul. 30, 2009, 09:09 AM
Small Arabian (with an abundance of Crabbet breeding) or a Welara... sound, sane, athletic and cute :)

Arabian dressage pony stallion (14.1 hh) (http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g278/Copperleaf/ShenandoahClassicStrongCanter.jpg)

Welara foal 1 (by the above stallion) (http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g278/Copperleaf/Blacks2009Filly.jpg)

Welara foal 2 (out of an Arabian mare) (http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g278/Copperleaf/Smooch.jpg)

Daydream Believer
Jul. 30, 2009, 09:13 AM
Not a true "pony" breed...rather a small horse....but look into the Colonial Spanish horses. They run from 13:2 to 15 hands and are very Iberian in type...kind of like little Lusitanos. I purpose breed for sport and there are a couple other breeders now that are doing the same thing. They are priced way better still in general than the imports also. The downsides are that they are rare still and it's hard to find one well trained for sale. Lots of nice youngstock around though in the US and many are unusual colors also. A number have been exported to Europe now and now Australia has their first Col. Spanish horses down there now.

Here are a couple of my youngsters to get a sense of what they look like. If you are interested in the breed, I can point you to some reputable breeders also and would be happy to do so.

http://i191.photobucket.com/albums/z144/hau_kea/Rainbows%20End%20Farm/IMG_5558.jpg

http://i191.photobucket.com/albums/z144/hau_kea/Rainbows%20End%20Farm/IMG_5054.jpg

http://i191.photobucket.com/albums/z144/hau_kea/Rainbows%20End%20Farm/IMG_5058.jpg

http://i191.photobucket.com/albums/z144/hau_kea/Rainbows%20End%20Farm/IMG_5094.jpg

http://i191.photobucket.com/albums/z144/hau_kea/Rainbows%20End%20Farm/IMG_5272.jpg

http://i191.photobucket.com/albums/z144/hau_kea/Rainbows%20End%20Farm/IMG_4882.jpg

Wayside
Jul. 30, 2009, 09:23 AM
A good 14.1 Arabian. :D

I had one of those, and he was awesome. Incredibly athletic and coordinated. Kept him until he passed away a couple yeard ago. He was, however, poster child for the "crazy Arab" stereotype. I've aalso seen some that were saints, very good at packing kids around.

So as with all things, you have to look at the individual, more than the breed. Keep this in mind as I proceed to make some gross generalizations :lol:

Anyhow, the first that came to mind for me was Welsh. Mainly because I've seen so many with fabulous kid-friendly temperments. They can be great little performers too, but since so many of them have been bred to pack the kids around, I think that their average personality is pretty steady. And imo, that's a huge factor in keeping kids interested in a sport, having a mount that's fun for them to ride and work with.

If your goals are low-level, or you can find a exceptional individual, I agree with pp that there are a lot of QH ponies out there with great temperments as well, and I've seen a lot of smaller Morgans that were fabulous too.

The GRP's that I've seen have had a lot more flash and wow factor, with a little more aptitude for dressage than your average QH or Morgan, but also seemed like they'd be a bit more to handle. They were very much like small horses.

I've heard good things about the Connemaras, but I've never actually spent much time with one, so I can't comment.

So that's enough of my sweeping generalizations for now. I've seen great ponies in all kinds of breeds, and some really amazing "Mystery Mutt" ponies as well. You'll know the right one when you find it.

grayarabpony
Jul. 30, 2009, 12:11 PM
exvet, the 13 hand Welsh cob is adorable!! I love his color too.

DDB, once again beautiful pictures. I think my favorite picture in that set is the silver dun (?). I love the coloring of the grulla pinto too. I've never seen a horse that color before you put up pictures of her.

HappyHoppingHaffy
Jul. 30, 2009, 12:54 PM
Okay, so I'm a wee bit biased when it comes to haffies. :)
Jillian Santi competes her haffie at PSG. She even won a regional championship on him at PSG.
http://www.chronofhorse.com/index.php?cat=100204042587690&ShowArticle_ID=1332310083982642

Haffies are really great "little big" horses. I'm just starting to do dressage with mine now and were having a great time! I primarily hunted him in the past. Here's a couple of pics from our recent dressage debut!

http://mysticalphotography.instaproofs.com/includes/zoomDialup.php?fav=0&col=0&id=37487314&style=original

http://mysticalphotography.instaproofs.com/includes/zoomDialup.php?fav=0&col=0&id=37487354&style=original

InWhyCee Redux
Jul. 30, 2009, 01:50 PM
Don't forget the honeys: All those mellow Apps and QHs you can get on the cheap because they topped out at 14.1. ;)

Halflingers: Beautiful, but I know someone who learned the hard way some Haffies need to WORK EVERY DAY, AND A LOT.

I met someone who did dressage on a Norwegian Fjord pony and CUTE didn't begin to cover it....

Ambrey
Jul. 30, 2009, 01:58 PM
If I had the $$, I'd have a Welsh Cob and that bay roan on DDB's post. And the two I have ;)

lovemyrobin
Jul. 30, 2009, 02:12 PM
Are you looking for Pony Size or Pony Breeding? We have a British Riding Pony that did very well his 1st year out in Training Level. He had the highest Training Level score in 5 of the 8 shows he did (Jrs and AA's), his highest was 70% Training 2 and 68% Training 4 with his 15 year old Hunter Eq rider.

I have a Conn/TB mare that also does pretty well, she just is a little hotter and we have "issues" at times. She can be breathtaking at times.

But both my horses are over pony size (15 and 15.1 hands)

Here is my Conn/TB schooling about 2 weeks ago
http://pets.webshots.com/photo/2805438520055040504PFRyID
http://pets.webshots.com/photo/2506802870055040504cmYBYY

and here is the British Riding Pony
http://pets.webshots.com/photo/2333743410055040504EROxSj

goodpony
Jul. 30, 2009, 03:26 PM
Here are some of our Connemara Ponies (I have five purebreds and 2 partbreds--Love Em')

The grey is a six year old who is competing successfully at 2nd Level Dressage and working Third Level Movements. He also successfully competes at Training Level Eventing (we think he will do Preliminary this fall). The Bay is my four year old homebred who is just starting at out at Training Level with scores in the very high 60's. The Buckskin Pony is a our Four Year old Mare who my husband started this spring. She is also just starting out at Training Level with Scores in the very High Sixties. The dam of the buckskin Pony competed on the Canadian FEI Pony Team and was many times champion. All are purebred ponies and all are pony size and as you can see all are quite capable of carrying an adult.

dilligaff2
Jul. 31, 2009, 11:08 AM
I am going to put in another vote for Welsh/Arab crosses. (I had no idea there was a registry! :) )

Our 14.1 boy is one he!! of a Dressage pony. A pony yes :lol: but an awesome mover.

http://img248.imageshack.us/img248/487/44711176433309995597359.jpg

hluing
Aug. 1, 2009, 08:19 AM
German Riding Ponies have been bred to compete in dressage, jumping, and eventing. Many of them are VERY well suited to dressage as can be seen by some of them competing in the US very succesfully against warmbloods. Although many adults like myself are taking advantage of this smaller, highly talented breed...they are bred in Germany for children. Although they are forward and sometimes quite flashy...they as a whole have very good temperments and are very trainable. I have started several myself and I think all of them will be quite suitable for children or adults.

torontodressage
Aug. 1, 2009, 10:47 AM
German Riding Ponies have been bred to compete in dressage, jumping, and eventing. Many of them are VERY well suited to dressage as can be seen by some of them competing in the US very succesfully against warmbloods. Although many adults like myself are taking advantage of this smaller, highly talented breed...they are bred in Germany for children. Although they are forward and sometimes quite flashy...they as a whole have very good temperments and are very trainable. I have started several myself and I think all of them will be quite suitable for children or adults.

I understand that if you are over 18 years old, you're not allowed to ride ponies anymore in Europe.

tempichange
Aug. 1, 2009, 04:38 PM
here are mine:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v401/tempichange/Sinari%20Poulin%20Clinic%2008/P1030907.jpg

Schooling fourth, will be doing her third level stuff this fall. Hoping to get her to PSG by end of next year.

and my newest little guy:

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_16IfSpZAOn0/SmZ2BtGRu-I/AAAAAAAAAaE/XJ6Ql1sYZ3A/s1600-h/DSCN0619.JPG

goodpony
Aug. 1, 2009, 09:33 PM
she is SO cute!

tempichange
Aug. 2, 2009, 12:32 AM
those are from last year, these are from June. I don't think they're the best mostly just schooling lateral work, but darnit it was freaking hot and I look not so good (but she always looks good despite it):

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v401/tempichange/Sinari%20Poulin%20Clinic%2009/Sinaripoulinclinicjun092.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v401/tempichange/Sinari%20Poulin%20Clinic%2009/Sinaripoulinclinicjun096.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v401/tempichange/Sinari%20Poulin%20Clinic%2009/Sinaripoulinclinicjun098.jpg

Ambrey
Aug. 2, 2009, 12:36 AM
She's lovely :)

adelmo95
Aug. 2, 2009, 09:35 AM
TempiChange,
I don't mean to hijack this thread, your mare looks lovely and it is great to see that you are wearing a helmet however with the way it is positioned on your head in the photos you are leaving your frontal lobe completely unprotected. This is a very important part of your brain to protect as it controls things such as motor function, language, memory, judgement, social behavior, and impulse control to name a few. If you repositioned the helmet so that it sat further down on your forehead you would make it much more functional. Here is an example I found of a properly positioned helmet http://www.horsegroomingsupplies.com/pictures/files/1/8/2/4/4/rip13.JPG.

tempichange
Aug. 2, 2009, 10:06 AM
TempiChange,
I don't mean to hijack this thread, your mare looks lovely and it is great to see that you are wearing a helmet however with the way it is positioned on your head in the photos you are leaving your frontal lobe completely unprotected. This is a very important part of your brain to protect as it controls things such as motor function, language, memory, judgement, social behavior, and impulse control to name a few. If you repositioned the helmet so that it sat further down on your forehead you would make it much more functional. Here is an example I found of a properly positioned helmet http://www.horsegroomingsupplies.com/pictures/files/1/8/2/4/4/rip13.JPG.

Adelmo- I appreciate the tip. It normally fits, however, due to me continuously wiping sweat from my eyes during that clinic- I tipped my helmet back and apparently left it there (didn't realize that until I saw the photos). I was having many wardrobe malfunctions that day.

adelmo95
Aug. 2, 2009, 10:32 AM
That makes sense, I forget about what it must be like to live in warmer climates, being in Calgary we only get a couple really warm days a summer (and in comparison to elsewhere they still arn't that warm) so I have never encountered that problem...

goeslikestink
Aug. 2, 2009, 10:51 AM
I know probably this has been discussed before, but, what breeds (pony) that is, would you guys considered suitable for dressage? Name a few :winkgrin:

I am pony shopping for my son and .. oh heck, for me too!!!

how big a pony type depends on how big your child is

goeslikestink
Aug. 2, 2009, 10:54 AM
Adelmo- I appreciate the tip. It normally fits, however, due to me continuously wiping sweat from my eyes during that clinic- I tipped my helmet back and apparently left it there (didn't realize that until I saw the photos). I was having many wardrobe malfunctions that day.

if it was fitted correctly as above then the peak would protect your head and also sun rays
sweating aorund the forehead is a norm-- you get used to it

tempichange
Aug. 2, 2009, 11:04 AM
That makes sense, I forget about what it must be like to live in warmer climates, being in Calgary we only get a couple really warm days a summer (and in comparison to elsewhere they still arn't that warm) so I have never encountered that problem...

I can understand. In Kentucky, it's regularly a 90 plus heat index in June, July and August. On those particular days, it was 100 percent humidity. It was mid afternoon and we were already dripping.

tempichange
Aug. 2, 2009, 11:14 AM
if it was fitted correctly as above then the peak would protect your head and also sun rays
sweating aorund the forehead is a norm-- you get used to it

I'm used to sweating and normally the helmet I wear does absorb it and keep it out of my eyes. I've been wearing a helmet for as long as I've been riding, I am used to it.

However, I'm not used to excessively sweating in my eyes. I shifted it back because I was continuously wiping because I was dripping buckets and couldn't keep the line. I didn't fix the position. It stayed there.

Ambrey
Aug. 2, 2009, 12:27 PM
Tempi, I just bought a cool medics helmet liner on e-bay- if it works I'll let you know ;) Sounds like you needed it that day!

Enderle
Aug. 2, 2009, 02:01 PM
I understand that if you are over 18 years old, you're not allowed to ride ponies anymore in Europe.
Of course you are allowed to ride ponies. ;-) And also allowed to start in competitions. But only in open classes against horses.
"Pony competitions" are only open to riders up to 16 ys.

I' riding a GRP myself. He's working with handicapped children as well as doing dressage with other riders. He can be hot - but never with an unassertive rider. Being a very sensitive pony, he exactly knows what each rider wants and needs and is always willing to please.
Amazing pony, sadly not mine and not for sale.

SerenaGinger
Aug. 2, 2009, 06:34 PM
Wicky Stick-It Helmet Liners (http://www.smartpakequine.com/productclass.aspx?productClassid=6210)

These work wonders keeping sweat from dripping down into your eyes.

tempichange
Aug. 2, 2009, 09:26 PM
Tempi, I just bought a cool medics helmet liner on e-bay- if it works I'll let you know ;) Sounds like you needed it that day!

Thankfully, it hasn't been that bad since, but do let me know how the coolmedic stuff works! I wanted to order a few things from them at Rolex, but didn't have a huge cash flow then.

Ambrey
Aug. 3, 2009, 02:08 AM
but didn't have a huge cash flow then.

So you have a huge cash flow now? Want to share? If not, one of your ponies will do ;)

J/K- I'll let you know how it works! I actually got it for my mom, but I haven't told her that I'm going to use it at a show first, because I suspect I'll really need it ;)

tempichange
Aug. 3, 2009, 06:55 AM
So you have a huge cash flow now? Want to share? If not, one of your ponies will do ;)

J/K- I'll let you know how it works! I actually got it for my mom, but I haven't told her that I'm going to use it at a show first, because I suspect I'll really need it ;)

LOL. I usually reserve a bit for Rolex so I have supplies throughout the year;)

Cash though, I wish was no objective. Otherwise I'd need a team to get me home.

Simrat
Aug. 4, 2009, 01:11 AM
I haven't read the entire thread, but I'll second DDB on Colonial Spanish Horses. I have a 6 year old gelding that will be really nice when he's back in work. He's basically had the last year plus off for various reasons. But at 13.3 hands, there is a lot of baroque spark there. People usually think that he's larger than he is. This was him at 4 and green. I'm 5'9" for reference and the main reason that I'm currently looking for a smaller rider for him. :winkgrin:

http://akalranch.com/Paisano/images/070922-9368web.jpg

Lgd1
Aug. 4, 2009, 06:34 AM
I understand that if you are over 18 years old, you're not allowed to ride ponies anymore in Europe.

Pony classes at international level are up to 16 years.

Other than that you can ride ponies at any level except senior international FEI classes - they can be competed in national FEI classes.
I'm competing a pure bred Fell Pony at the equivalent of Level 3 and he frequently kicks the a$$ of swanky WBs :D He placed 5th in both Elementary (L2) and Medium (L3) at our last regional championships. However, he is NOT a kids pony and very much an adult ride (common to many Fell's).

Many Welsh D cobs come in horse size - there is no upper height limit now. Maesmynach bloodlines in particular tend to be taller, sometimes up to 16hh. Temperament is generally good but they can be quite fiery and opinionated at times.

A friend of mine has an awesome sport-bred Welsh D mare who is going to make some kid a fantastic FEI pony. She moves and looks like a mini-warmblood and has a superb active hindleg.

There are a substantial number of Welsh D's doing FEI pony classes and there are a number of studs in UK and the Netherlands who breed for the sport type.

New Forest Ponies are another breed that do well in dressage. I have a soft spot for the NFPs as my retired FEI level mare has NFP in her bloodlines.

Connemaras and connie crosses do well in dressage and eventing. Their temperaments tend to be very good and are generally less fiery than the Welsh cobs.

Ambrey
Aug. 4, 2009, 01:49 PM
I'm competing a pure bred Fell Pony at the equivalent of Level 3 and he frequently kicks the a$$ of swanky WBs :D He placed 5th in both Elementary (L2) and Medium (L3) at our last regional championships. However, he is NOT a kids pony and very much an adult ride (common to many Fell's).

Posting that with no pictures was just cruel. :winkgrin:

I'd also love to see pics of the 16hh Welsh D! That must be amazing!

Lgd1
Aug. 5, 2009, 08:53 AM
LArge Welsh D's - no problem

http://www.maesmynachstud.co.uk/

BJ (Fell) will have to wait until I'm at home :D

KellyS
Aug. 5, 2009, 09:05 AM
I've got a Welsh (Section B)/TB cross yearling. While I'm aiming him at being an event pony, he is just so well balanced, level headed, and a nice mover to boot. So I'm definitely looking forward to the dressage phase at events. :) He should mature 14.1 to 14.2 hands, but I look at the long legs and wonder if he'll be a bit taller. I'm 5'3--any height in that range is perfect for me.

http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?pid=560022&l=baa15623b5&id=1059684218

Of course, our newest driving pony is, well, we're not quite sure. Supposed to be a hackney cross, but who knows what he is crossed with. Our one driving friend calls him a mini Dutch warmblood (which is funny because his name is Dutch). Gotta love those "mutts"!!! :D

http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?pid=559729&l=cd425b4144&id=1059684218

JWB
Aug. 5, 2009, 09:28 AM
Here's a 13.2 hh Welsh Section-C mare that competes at PSG in the area.... And she's had a foal every year too and still stayed competititve. She's "sort of" for sale to the right home but I know her owner ADORES her and was hoping (but never did to my knowledge) to get a filly. She's had a few STUNNING colts that have been registered in the BWP pony book though.

http://www.mobilehorsesupply.com/images/Breeding%20Program/Mollie-2.jpg

Tamara in TN
Aug. 5, 2009, 01:26 PM
Here's a 13.2 hh Welsh Section-C mare that competes at PSG in the area....

http://www.mobilehorsesupply.com/images/Breeding%20Program/Mollie-2.jpg

the Dafydd daughter ? ...I just got to see him again this March...what a grand old fellow he is :)

best

Ambrey
Aug. 5, 2009, 01:54 PM
Here's a 13.2 hh Welsh Section-C mare that competes at PSG in the area.... And she's had a foal every year too and still stayed competititve. She's "sort of" for sale to the right home but I know her owner ADORES her and was hoping (but never did to my knowledge) to get a filly. She's had a few STUNNING colts that have been registered in the BWP pony book though.

http://www.mobilehorsesupply.com/images/Breeding%20Program/Mollie-2.jpg

Oh, yes, she's posted that photo here- she has some amazing brown jackets too!