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View Full Version : :( Starting to get anxiety! MOVING To FORT GORDON!



Briggsie
Jul. 29, 2009, 01:19 PM
Okay, i Have posted here before about this topic, but last time, my husband and i thought we would be moving to arizona. Not the case, and I am happy about that.

now, we are moving to Fort Gordon, Ga, which is near augusta.

Why is this posted on the dressage forum you say?
well, I am a dressage rider. This is where the anxiety kicks in.

I, in all of my stupidity, thought, hey, I deserve that dream horse. I had put in my time with greenies and paid my dues. Finally, I could do this. So, I bought him: a 17.2h swedish warmblood gelding, Almost at PSG, PUppy dog personality, a bit spooky, correct, everything you could want.

I have been a faithful client of my trainers for several years now, and she has had Donnie at her barn since he was imported from her sisters farm in sweden (who conveniently has access to some nice semen if you get my drift). So, I trust her. That is the bottom line. I am scared shitless to leave and now, I have an investment to protect, who by the way, has been started under saddle and trained all the way to where he is now, by one person. Donnie lives a charmed life where he is, and ideally, keeping him here in md. would be great...but God knows I did not just shell out HUGE BUCKS to keep my horse here while I am in georgia for 3 plus years, not to mention paying training board the whole time, and not riding. How stupid and financially stupid is that?

also, my other concerns:
he is never turned out with other horses. Each horse is turned out in their own field where I board....Maybe one day he can be turned out with other guys?? I mean, my trainer is always saying "upper level horse dont get turned out, they are too valuable?" Is there truth to that? I am sure most other stable i go to are going to turn him out...and i dont want to be that pain in the ass diva everyone in the barn hates because of my special horse. I hate that.

You all know as well as I, trainers are a dime a dozen. I am scared of the people out there who take your money or worse, dont know what in the hell they are doing. He is a big intimidating horse and needs a confident rider. Even down here i have met "trainers" who are afraid of their own shadow and wont get on anythign not already push button (frauds is what I call them)....I would like to steer clear of people like that. MY boy and me need a confident person to bring us both along, and keep donnie going and doing the in betweens that I am not capable of doing.

Please PM me with any advice, or say it here openly. I tried to get a hold of Ellie Schobel, i know she is in aiken. But, never heard back. I loved her horsemanship when i saw her at devon and thought she was a kind rider with true inate horse sense. That is someone i want training my horse for sure.

Advice?? Any will be appreciated and kept in utmost confidence. I really need help guys. I am so scared of doing this move. Finding a job is another problem....I am a governemnt contractor...so hopefully I find work there using my security clearance that will still afford me the opportunity to keep up with the worlds most expensive sport!

Thank you all so much.

elly
Jul. 29, 2009, 01:40 PM
Hi there -

so sorry, I did not get your message/email - just send you a PM -

merrygoround
Jul. 29, 2009, 01:42 PM
Aiken is HORSE COUNTRY. Robert Hall, Fulmer School was there , and is most likely still in the area. Many of the top riders go there for the winter months.

Contact either Eliza or Cindy Sydnor for the names of good people in the area. Eliza is in Columbia, SC. and is listed in the USDF handbook.

Enjoy.

Our UL, and PSG horses get turned out in a compatible group, usually 3 or 4. Avoids separation anxiety.

forestergirl99
Jul. 29, 2009, 02:29 PM
Here is a nice looking barn that isn't too far from you.

http://www.afterthefoxfarm.com/index.htm

Changing trainers can be scary, but you really should take your horse with you. I mean you spent forever trying to get him, and then you are just going to not ride him for 3 years? There are other good trainers. Try going to some different barns and taking a few lessons to get a feel of the place. Then you can see how you click with the people, and it you might want to board your horse there.

Briggsie
Jul. 29, 2009, 02:33 PM
You guys are the best! This was the kind of input I was looking for. I know that there are some great people down that way, I just need to find them. Having spent 9 years in maryland, I know who is who.

Elly, Thanks so much for getting back to me! I really appreciate it. You def. wont remember me, but I was in your aisle in the CDI barn at Devon for the IBC classes. I remember your awesome horse, Riason de Joi, and you guys cleaned up the competition. You were a nice person, and there I was nervouse as hell with my two year old i was running through the RPSI IBC. you helped me fix my noseband and gave me some pointers. I really appreciated your humbleness and thought gee, that lady has her stuff together!

Anyway, I will be in touch!

Others, I would love to hear from you.

Has anyone ever boarded at the Fort gordon stables? I think the best sitautaion for me woudl be to get into a full time board and training like i am here (oh, i dream of the day when I can ride in my sleep and dont need "real riders" to help!)

ElizaS
Jul. 29, 2009, 02:49 PM
Thanks for the recommendation, merrygoround. However, I am not in Columbia anymore. I was just spending the winter there 2 winters ago. I have tried to get USDF to change my address on line, but to no avail...

We are in Snow Camp, NC. I give clinics in Camden, SC, and I do know quite a few people in the area, so please feel free to email me. Good luck with your search!

cloudyandcallie
Jul. 29, 2009, 02:57 PM
Your are going to be near Aiken and you'll be fine. Plus outside of Augusta is Columbia County and there is a hunt club and lots of horses.
Hot, humid, but horse country. Go to www.aikenhorsesonline.com (http://www.aikenhorsesonline.com) for info and to place ads.

Google the Belle Meade hunt club and ask the Wilsons for referrals for a barn and boarding to suit your needs. Just get ready for the heat and the humidity. Ask Lucy Bell at the Belle Meade hunt for help and tell her you know about her and the cop in Louisville, lol. And tell her the guys in Waycross said "tallyho." (She was a whipper in at Belle Meade.)

BTW your swedish wb will do fine if turned out with horses, he is even bigger than my Hessen, who when turned out learned to let a mare defend his honor.

BTW the medical college of the University of Georgia is located up in Augusta, as well as that little golf course.

slc2
Jul. 29, 2009, 05:47 PM
Okay, i Have posted here before about this topic, but last time, my husband and i thought we would be moving to arizona. Not the case, and I am happy about that.

now, we are moving to Fort Gordon, Ga, which is near augusta.

--Augusta is near many top notch trainers. It is near Alpharetta, it is near NC, there are plenty of dressage trainers around. At your doorstep? No. But in fact, most of us don't have the trainer of choice at our doorstep. We load up our horses in to our trailers, we drive to the trainer's a couple our 6 hours, and spend a long weekend there once in a while, and in between time, we work by ourselves. Those of us who have daily access to a top quality, experienced, affordable and AVAILABLE trainer are really in the minority. The rest of us make do.

--Augusta is very near Florida. A few weeks 'intensive' in Florida, working with the top trainer of your choice during the winter season, ain't too shabby a way to spend your vacay.

Why is this posted on the dressage forum you say?
well, I am a dressage rider. This is where the anxiety kicks in.

I, in all of my stupidity, thought, hey, I deserve that dream horse.

--Everyone deserves a dream horse. You're so lucky! It's great to hear you got him!

I had put in my time with greenies and paid my dues. Finally, I could do this. So, I bought him: a 17.2h swedish warmblood gelding, Almost at PSG, PUppy dog personality, a bit spooky, correct, everything you could want.

I have been a faithful client of my trainers for several years now, and she has had Donnie at her barn since he was imported from her sisters farm in sweden (who conveniently has access to some nice semen if you get my drift). So, I trust her. That is the bottom line. I am scared shitless to leave and now, I have an investment to protect, who by the way, has been started under saddle and trained all the way to where he is now, by one person. Donnie lives a charmed life where he is, and ideally, keeping him here in md. would be great...but God knows I did not just shell out HUGE BUCKS to keep my horse here while I am in georgia for 3 plus years, not to mention paying training board the whole time, and not riding. How stupid and financially stupid is that?

--The horse is doing almost PSG. Can you ride him? DO you ride him? Is it part of your daily routine to ride? Do you WANT to continue riding him? Do you ENJOY riding him?

also, my other concerns:
he is never turned out with other horses. Each horse is turned out in their own field where I board....Maybe one day he can be turned out with other guys?? I mean, my trainer is always saying "upper level horse dont get turned out, they are too valuable?" Is there truth to that?

--Well you will find enough people here who will have FITS if they hear a horse goes out in a pasture by himself. I think it's fine. If they can see other horses, they are perfectly content. MOST people, to be perfectly honest, are not putting dream horses that have been trained by professionals for all their lives and are doing PSG out in a pasture with other horses. MOST people find it too risky to justify. MOST fit, active, FEI horses aren't out in groups of horses.

I am sure most other stable i go to are going to turn him out...and i dont want to be that pain in the ass diva everyone in the barn hates because of my special horse. I hate that.

--It varies from barn to barn. There are decent places to board down there. OR...you could always buy your own place, and put in an outdoor ring. I think much of the year, you can ride outside. You might during the really yucky part of the winter send the horse to the trainer for a couple months for a training refresher, a lot of people do that.

You all know as well as I, trainers are a dime a dozen.

--Bad trainers are a dime a dozen.

I am scared of the people out there who take your money or worse, dont know what in the hell they are doing. He is a big intimidating horse and needs a confident rider. Even down here i have met "trainers" who are afraid of their own shadow and wont get on anythign not already push button (frauds is what I call them)....I would like to steer clear of people like that. MY boy and me need a confident person to bring us both along, and keep donnie going and doing the in betweens that I am not capable of doing.

--What inbetweens? You aren't planning on riding the horse regularly? Do you need someone getting on him all the time or you're afraid you'll have problems riding him? Do you need constant help, or can you be more independent?

--If you need continual help, and aren't confident riding him for long periods of time by yourself, there are a couple options.

--One is to sell him, and get a horse you can be more independent with, the other is to leave him with a trainer, and visit and ride him occasionally, while the trainer maintains his training and keeps him manageable....until or when or if you find someone locally you trust.

Please PM me with any advice, or say it here openly. I tried to get a hold of Ellie Schobel, i know she is in aiken. But, never heard back. I loved her horsemanship when i saw her at devon and thought she was a kind rider with true inate horse sense. That is someone i want training my horse for sure.

--Ellie is a wonderful, wonderful kind person based on the little interaction I have had with her. She really cares about horses and people. She is not that far for someone who can ride independently and go to her for occasional 'intensives' or for someone who wants to leave a horse with her and come ride it every couple weekends.

Advice?? Any will be appreciated and kept in utmost confidence. I really need help guys. I am so scared of doing this move. Finding a job is another problem....I am a governemnt contractor...so hopefully I find work there using my security clearance that will still afford me the opportunity to keep up with the worlds most expensive sport!

Thank you all so much.

--It is so hard for so many people right now who are forced to move and try to set themselves up in a new place. I hope it works out really well for you.

'I gonna si yo piddy on the runny ki'
--Pootie

Briggsie
Jul. 29, 2009, 09:21 PM
Hi SLC, thanks for taking the time to address some of my questions and concerns.

I will clarify, because every bit of info helps, just in case someone out there has what I need and can give a ref:
You bring up some excellent points:

SLC: Those of us who have daily access to a top quality, experienced, affordable and AVAILABLE trainer are really in the minority. The rest of us make do.

That is exactly what I may have to do if we buy our own piece of property. And to tell you the truth, that would be ideal. that brings me to my next statement:

SLC wrote: --What inbetweens? You aren't planning on riding the horse regularly? Do you need someone getting on him all the time or you're afraid you'll have problems riding him? Do you need constant help, or can you be more independent?

--If you need continual help, and aren't confident riding him for long periods of time by yourself, there are a couple options.

By in betweens i mean, if i were in the situation where I had to care for him or say board on the post stables......and a good trainer was not riding him on days I was not....then maybe I could find someone accessable, to trailer in for a few lessons a month, just to make sure I am on track, you know? Maybe send him away for a month.....

I guess I have just had the luxury of boarding at a barn where an FEI trainer has always been my backup. If i cannot ride that day, or have a less, I know Marija will be riding him, thus continuing his education or reinforcing what I am not. Not to mention, the luxery of someone riding him who has put her whole heart into his progression.

I know i need that. I know i am a capable rider, but def. need to be under someone's tutelage. I dont want to get in over my head...he is a lot of horse. I guess I just don't want to end up with a wasted investment...and I cannot bring him along further because I only ride a good solid 2nd level.

--The horse is doing almost PSG. Can you ride him? DO you ride him? Is it part of your daily routine to ride? Do you WANT to continue riding him? Do you ENJOY riding hi

Right now, I ride 4-5 days a week, 2 days pretty much in the same ring while marija is schooling her's, and the other 3 or 2 days with her on the ground.

So, yeah, the goal is to keep up with a good routine. I don't want a pasture ornament....Lord knows horses are too expensive to have that! (especially when you are indebted to the bank for one!)

--Well you will find enough people here who will have FITS if they hear a horse goes out in a pasture by himself. I think it's fine. If they can see other horses, they are perfectly content. MOST people, to be perfectly honest, are not putting dream horses that have been trained by professionals for all their lives and are doing PSG out in a pasture with other horses. MOST people find it too risky to justify. MOST fit, active, FEI horses aren't out in groups of horses.

And this is what I thought too, but was wondering, hey, if I am in the scenario where I have to board at the fort stables (which i have to say is exceptionally nice, compared to even where Donnie is now!), I am just worried about having him out with the horses. I guess because some people just dont maintain the same level of care he is accustomed to. God I hope that does not sound snotty. But, I think you guys can sympathize. And yeah, as far as it being risky, it is. I would hate for him to pull a suspensory or something goofy like that because he was whatever or kicked.....and yeah, he is way to valuable to be beat up and look like crap.

So, in short, these are all of my worries. However, i know if i find the right place and person, none of this will be a problem.







Okay, i Have posted here before about this topic, but last time, my husband and i thought we would be moving to arizona. Not the case, and I am happy about that.

now, we are moving to Fort Gordon, Ga, which is near augusta.

--Augusta is near many top notch trainers. It is near Alpharetta, it is near NC, there are plenty of dressage trainers around. At your doorstep? No. But in fact, most of us don't have the trainer of choice at our doorstep. We load up our horses in to our trailers, we drive to the trainer's a couple our 6 hours, and spend a long weekend there once in a while, and in between time, we work by ourselves. Those of us who have daily access to a top quality, experienced, affordable and AVAILABLE trainer are really in the minority. The rest of us make do.

--Augusta is very near Florida. A few weeks 'intensive' in Florida, working with the top trainer of your choice during the winter season, ain't too shabby a way to spend your vacay.

Why is this posted on the dressage forum you say?
well, I am a dressage rider. This is where the anxiety kicks in.

I, in all of my stupidity, thought, hey, I deserve that dream horse.

--Everyone deserves a dream horse. You're so lucky! It's great to hear you got him!

I had put in my time with greenies and paid my dues. Finally, I could do this. So, I bought him: a 17.2h swedish warmblood gelding, Almost at PSG, PUppy dog personality, a bit spooky, correct, everything you could want.

I have been a faithful client of my trainers for several years now, and she has had Donnie at her barn since he was imported from her sisters farm in sweden (who conveniently has access to some nice semen if you get my drift). So, I trust her. That is the bottom line. I am scared shitless to leave and now, I have an investment to protect, who by the way, has been started under saddle and trained all the way to where he is now, by one person. Donnie lives a charmed life where he is, and ideally, keeping him here in md. would be great...but God knows I did not just shell out HUGE BUCKS to keep my horse here while I am in georgia for 3 plus years, not to mention paying training board the whole time, and not riding. How stupid and financially stupid is that?

--The horse is doing almost PSG. Can you ride him? DO you ride him? Is it part of your daily routine to ride? Do you WANT to continue riding him? Do you ENJOY riding him?

also, my other concerns:
he is never turned out with other horses. Each horse is turned out in their own field where I board....Maybe one day he can be turned out with other guys?? I mean, my trainer is always saying "upper level horse dont get turned out, they are too valuable?" Is there truth to that?

--Well you will find enough people here who will have FITS if they hear a horse goes out in a pasture by himself. I think it's fine. If they can see other horses, they are perfectly content. MOST people, to be perfectly honest, are not putting dream horses that have been trained by professionals for all their lives and are doing PSG out in a pasture with other horses. MOST people find it too risky to justify. MOST fit, active, FEI horses aren't out in groups of horses.

I am sure most other stable i go to are going to turn him out...and i dont want to be that pain in the ass diva everyone in the barn hates because of my special horse. I hate that.

--It varies from barn to barn. There are decent places to board down there. OR...you could always buy your own place, and put in an outdoor ring. I think much of the year, you can ride outside. You might during the really yucky part of the winter send the horse to the trainer for a couple months for a training refresher, a lot of people do that.

You all know as well as I, trainers are a dime a dozen.

--Bad trainers are a dime a dozen.

I am scared of the people out there who take your money or worse, dont know what in the hell they are doing. He is a big intimidating horse and needs a confident rider. Even down here i have met "trainers" who are afraid of their own shadow and wont get on anythign not already push button (frauds is what I call them)....I would like to steer clear of people like that. MY boy and me need a confident person to bring us both along, and keep donnie going and doing the in betweens that I am not capable of doing.

--What inbetweens? You aren't planning on riding the horse regularly? Do you need someone getting on him all the time or you're afraid you'll have problems riding him? Do you need constant help, or can you be more independent?

--If you need continual help, and aren't confident riding him for long periods of time by yourself, there are a couple options.

--One is to sell him, and get a horse you can be more independent with, the other is to leave him with a trainer, and visit and ride him occasionally, while the trainer maintains his training and keeps him manageable....until or when or if you find someone locally you trust.

Please PM me with any advice, or say it here openly. I tried to get a hold of Ellie Schobel, i know she is in aiken. But, never heard back. I loved her horsemanship when i saw her at devon and thought she was a kind rider with true inate horse sense. That is someone i want training my horse for sure.

--Ellie is a wonderful, wonderful kind person based on the little interaction I have had with her. She really cares about horses and people. She is not that far for someone who can ride independently and go to her for occasional 'intensives' or for someone who wants to leave a horse with her and come ride it every couple weekends.

Advice?? Any will be appreciated and kept in utmost confidence. I really need help guys. I am so scared of doing this move. Finding a job is another problem....I am a governemnt contractor...so hopefully I find work there using my security clearance that will still afford me the opportunity to keep up with the worlds most expensive sport!

Thank you all so much.

--It is so hard for so many people right now who are forced to move and try to set themselves up in a new place. I hope it works out really well for you.

'I gonna si yo piddy on the runny ki'
--Pootie

slc2
Jul. 29, 2009, 10:30 PM
A few people turn FEI horses out with other horses. Quite a few don't. What your horse is used to, is what he needs to continue to do.

You can't let other people picking on you change what you feel is right for your horse. Turnout is a very bad issue for some people. The best thing is to pick a barn where the horse can go out in indiividual paddocks and where that's normal. Trying to make that happen in a facility where it really isn't set up for that just doesn't work. Being in the minority and moving into a barn that is only very marginally and begrudgingly going to accomodate you is a mistake. If you have an FEI dressage horse that gets turned out individually, go to a barn full of FEI dressage horses that get turned out individually.

It is never a good idea to compromise to please someone else, if compromising means putting your horse in harm's way. And doing things different from how your horse was done for years and years, is putting your horse in harm's way. They're best off doing things the way they're most used to doing things. And I feel horses are perfectly content when turned out in separate paddocks. They notice where the other horses are and are happy having other horses nearby.

atr
Jul. 30, 2009, 12:16 AM
You really shouldn't have too much trouble finding somewhere where your horse can be turned out alone.

My horse doesn't get turned out with a herd. I've never had that much difficulty finding the right situation for him.

You'll find a trainer and a barn... it might take a couple of go-rounds, but that's OK, really. You aren't entering into a marriage contract when you sign on with either. If they don't suit you, move on gracefully--and swiftly.

Briggsie
Jul. 30, 2009, 09:03 AM
I love you! I love you I love you! This is what I was trying to convey to my husband, PRECISELY. And, i would not even have a problem turning him out with other horses, as long as someone tried this carefully and under initial supervision....which is not what i forsee happening at a barn that does not understand "dressage horses".

My hubby is like, well, he will be just fine.....yeah right! IF you have a ferrarri, you dont take it to jiffy lube. You know?

I am glad I have you guys to talk to about this. Because this is the biggest source of anxiety on the move.

Thankfully, there seems to be many professional horsemen/women in the area i am moving to...Like Ellie and those she pointed out.

So, if i stick with the professionals, I will be fine.



A few people turn FEI horses out with other horses. Quite a few don't. What your horse is used to, is what he needs to continue to do.

You can't let other people picking on you change what you feel is right for your horse. Turnout is a very bad issue for some people. The best thing is to pick a barn where the horse can go out in indiividual paddocks and where that's normal. Trying to make that happen in a facility where it really isn't set up for that just doesn't work. Being in the minority and moving into a barn that is only very marginally and begrudgingly going to accomodate you is a mistake. If you have an FEI dressage horse that gets turned out individually, go to a barn full of FEI dressage horses that get turned out individually.

It is never a good idea to compromise to please someone else, if compromising means putting your horse in harm's way. And doing things different from how your horse was done for years and years, is putting your horse in harm's way. They're best off doing things the way they're most used to doing things. And I feel horses are perfectly content when turned out in separate paddocks. They notice where the other horses are and are happy having other horses nearby.

magickmeadow
Jul. 30, 2009, 09:57 AM
I used to live in NC and the surrounding states are absolutely wonderful, full of great horse people, amateur and professional alike. There is nothing like a Southern spring.

I wanted to comment on your statement "So, if i stick with the professionals, I will be fine." Just because someone is a professional does not make them the only "game" in town nor does it make them the best person to care for a horse. In NC at least there were many private barns owned by amateurs that I would have had no problem leaving my horses with. There were also several professionals that I would have flown like a bat out of Utah to avoid. There are also non-dressage barns that take superior care of horses and dressage barns that don't. With relatives in other disciplines who take superior care of any equine in their facility, I would be remiss if I did not make that statement. I am currently in a multi-discipline barn that is wonderful complete with individual turnout. While it is nice to have other dressage riders to commiserate with, for me, it is not a requirement. I can easily go to my trainer.

Having said that, I must say that Georgia is a beautiful state and you should not have any problem finding a good match for you and your horse.

dressage_fan
Jul. 30, 2009, 05:21 PM
I'm surprised nobody has mentioned Shawna Harding in nearby Aiken. Her contact information is here: www.shawnaharding.com