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caddym
Jul. 27, 2009, 09:48 AM
lets say that you are a very serious amateur. You have 2 horses both with GP potential and you have the flexibility to move and find employment anywhere in the US. You ride your own horses and are looking for training and the opportunity to compete within easy traveling distance from your home base

Where would you go? who would you train with?

I think the obvious answer is Wellington and there are 2 jobs available in west palm beech, but I don't think I want to live in FL year round. Also FL has a very unusual health care system. It is one of 2 states that does not require MD's to carry malpractice insurance - so many MD's buy there own (50k a year in my case) or do without.

So any ideas besides Florida?

Tallac
Jul. 27, 2009, 09:53 AM
Southern California

GreekDressageQueen
Jul. 27, 2009, 10:14 AM
I would find a trainer first and then move to wherever he/she is. Some of my favorite trainers don't live in any big metropolitan cities so it is difficult to say "Oh yes move to Wellington or San Diego, etc."

FriesianX
Jul. 27, 2009, 10:30 AM
So-Cal or even Central California. The big question - who do you want to train with? Then move close to them :) So Cal gives you so many options. Nor Cal also has quite a few options, but if $ were unlimited, I'd head to Santa Barbara - easy enough drive to spend weekends with some top trainers.

Dune
Jul. 27, 2009, 10:54 AM
Southern CA, hands down, specifically SD. PM me if you want to know more. :winkgrin:

Dressage Art
Jul. 27, 2009, 10:58 AM
Southern CA, hands down, specifically SD.Ditto San Diego and Southern California. This is where the big guns are. Inland is hot, but coastline is a dream! The weather is milder than Florida. But Florida will be the natural 2nd choice, since they also have amazing Trainers.

If you are serious about multiple GP horses, I would look for a trainer who proven to train up and sustain multiple GP horses as well (at US or International Levels?) While there are many trainers who got their Gold Medal on 1 GP horse (...but may be trained by somebody else or were just blessed with an easy packer?) the ones who trained 100+ GP horses can bring so much more experience to the table and troubleshoot various issues.

FancyFree
Jul. 27, 2009, 11:01 AM
San Diego, where I live. There are so many training options here. From very big names to lesser known but also very good. Plus you absolutely can not beat the weather. :)

dotneko
Jul. 27, 2009, 11:26 AM
What is your medical specialty?
In Massachusetts we have top notch hospitals and
medical care. In addition, you can find many trainers
here (even a few that don't go to Florida for the winter)
Dot

caddym
Jul. 27, 2009, 12:02 PM
I'm OB/GYN.

After reading the recent threads about the layoffs in the law industry, I am so greatful for the stability of my career.

I just started a job in Massachusetts this month and things are working out well for me and the horses.

I have a 2 year contract - but could easily break it after one year, So I'm thinking of long term plan

So I think I will check out California. The obvious choices are Gunter Seidel and Steffan Peters, but are they taking students? Boarding for 2 horses? Other ideas?

FancyFree
Jul. 27, 2009, 12:11 PM
So I think I will check out California. The obvious choices are Gunter Seidel and Steffan Peters, but are they taking students? Boarding for 2 horses?

I don't know about GS but not too long ago I saw an ad for Arroyo Del Mar (Steffen Peters' place) for openings in their barn. Last I heard, board runs around $1000 a month. Training a bit more.

Here's a link to the CDS San Diego's trainers list:

http://www.sandiegodressage.com/trainerdirectory.html

His website is listed there. He has a lovely facility, just beautiful. I'm next door at a much cheaper place. Wave to me from your covered if you move there. :lol:

Trevelyan96
Jul. 27, 2009, 12:28 PM
If you don't want to go to California, there are also a lot of excellent dressage trainers around the Annapolis MD area, and its just a hop to Devon, and some great university medical facilities (John Hopkins, Georgetown, GW). Land is still available, winters aren't horribly severe, cost of living is highter than FL but lower than CA. And we don't have earthquakes or wildfires.

meupatdoes
Jul. 27, 2009, 02:46 PM
lets say that you are a very serious amateur. You have 2 horses both with GP potential and you have the flexibility to move and find employment anywhere in the US. You ride your own horses and are looking for training and the opportunity to compete within easy traveling distance from your home base

Where would you go? who would you train with?

I think the obvious answer is Wellington and there are 2 jobs available in west palm beech, but I don't think I want to live in FL year round. Also FL has a very unusual health care system. It is one of 2 states that does not require MD's to carry malpractice insurance - so many MD's buy there own (50k a year in my case) or do without.

So any ideas besides Florida?

50k a year for malpractice insurance?

My dad was an OBGN in New York and I think he finally had to retire at age 79 when the malpractice insurance went up to a quarter of a million dollars a year.


As for places to live, you really only need one trainer that you click with and access to shows.

NJ and NY have some lovely trainers, and unlike California, there is much better opportunity for turn out for the horses.

Virginia is less expensive and has a lot of shows to go to.

Maya01
Jul. 27, 2009, 02:47 PM
Southern California

Or South Carolina ;)

schwing
Jul. 27, 2009, 03:51 PM
As I am in the middle of the exact same process (serious ammy with one baby GP horse and a very good pospect) I would definitely recommend finding a trainer FIRST then planning the move.

I, too, bless my job stability at times like this - I'm an ER RN and can get work anywhere. The harder part was relocating the husband and two kids just so I could follow my dream!! :D

AppendixQHLover
Jul. 27, 2009, 04:24 PM
Maryland is a good state. There are some good trainers. You are within driving distance to Devon, Morven Park and other big events.

I live in the boonie part of MD but up near Annapolis there are nicer barns. John Hopkins is a really nice hospital and has a great OB/GYN department.

rizzodm
Jul. 27, 2009, 04:29 PM
How about Modesto;)

FriesianX
Jul. 27, 2009, 04:41 PM
How about Modesto;)

If you move to Modesto with your FEI horses, we WILL give you honorary membership in the WTF registry too:D

Dressage Art
Jul. 27, 2009, 05:02 PM
If you move to Modesto with your FEI horses, we WILL give you honorary membership in the WTF registry too:DWhat kind of Warmblood WTF registry is?

YankeeLawyer
Jul. 27, 2009, 05:07 PM
I have lived in Southern California (Rancho Santa Fe, near San Diego), the Northeast, Southeast, and currently live in Virginia. I would recommend the San Diego area first for your specific goals. Virginia is extremely horsey, and a super place to have a farm, but does not have the breadth and depth of upper level dressage training available. There are some very good trainers here, but I think at GP level you would have more opportunities in S.D. If you were an upper level eventer my advice would be different. Plus, S.D. is gorgeous and you cannot beat the weather.

I would not pick Wellington because I think it is too seasonal (I have a home there and have shown there many times during WEF).

FriesianX
Jul. 27, 2009, 08:33 PM
I think the real question (or questions) are - who do you want to train with, and what kind of budget do you have? San Diego is EXPENSIVE but beautiful (all year around), but if you drive a ways out any direction, not so beautiful anymore (lots of high desert and rocks). Moorpark is perhaps a bit less expensive, different training opportunities, not quite as beautiful. Santa Barbara is beautiful and again, expensive. Are you planning on buying a house, or renting? Do you mind driving a ways to get to training (and driving in heavy traffic)? What about picking up and moving to Germany for a year or two;)

I agree, YL makes a good point, Wellington is seasonal, So-Cal is year round. NorCal is seasonal and less opportunities, although still more going on in the dressage scene than most of the US. Central CA coast is close to much of So-Cal and has a few top trainers (Charlotte Bredahl is the biggest name, I can think of off the top of my head), and is gorgeous.

If I had such an opportunity (hahahahaha), I'd probably fly out for a few weeks, schedule lessons with a few of the trainers you are interested in, see what works... Maybe visit a hospital or two and see if they appeal to you as a place to work;)

FriesianX
Jul. 27, 2009, 08:34 PM
What kind of Warmblood WTF registry is? www.WTFRegistry.com - a top notch registry:lol:

slc2
Jul. 27, 2009, 08:47 PM
I'd live here, but I'd add to the recipe about 150,000 jobs of various types.

Dressage Art
Jul. 27, 2009, 09:12 PM
www.WTFRegistry.com - a top notch registry:lol:A-HA! My mare would qualify as well :lol: since she has 4 different breeds mixed up in her. But I just think of her as my favorite "mutt", not "WTF Did I Breed"? ;)

scubed
Jul. 28, 2009, 07:31 AM
Come here! There are a lot of trainers in the NJ/MD/DE/PA area, including mine (www.bluehillfarmpa.com) and lots of hospitals, including top academic medical centers, but also other hospitals like Christiana or Chester County. It is a really lovely area and cost of living is probably less outrageous than SoCal, even if weather not as good.

caddym
Jul. 28, 2009, 08:01 AM
[QUOTE=FriesianX;4265977]I think the real question (or questions) are - who do you want to train with, and what kind of budget do you have? San Diego is EXPENSIVE but beautiful (all year around), but if you drive a ways out any direction, not so beautiful anymore (lots of high desert and rocks). Moorpark is perhaps a bit less expensive, different training opportunities, not quite as beautiful. Santa Barbara is beautiful and again, expensive. Are you planning on buying a house, or renting? Do you mind driving a ways to get to training (and driving in heavy traffic)? What about picking up and moving to Germany for a year or two;)

I DO mind driving. Most jobs for OB/GYN's have a 4 day work week plus call (Call tends to be one 24 hour shift a week plus weekends) So, the night I'm oncall, the horses get off. 3 days a week, I ride both horses AFTER work so a long commute through heavy traffic would be "very unpleasant"

Its not practical to think that I could get a license to practice medicine in another country (although Canada would be possible) and I can't afford not to work. (Still paying off the $120k off stud loans)

FriesianX
Jul. 28, 2009, 08:49 AM
[QUOTE=FriesianX;4265977]I think the real question (or questions) are - who do you want to train with, and what kind of budget do you have? San Diego is EXPENSIVE but beautiful (all year around), but if you drive a ways out any direction, not so beautiful anymore (lots of high desert and rocks). Moorpark is perhaps a bit less expensive, different training opportunities, not quite as beautiful. Santa Barbara is beautiful and again, expensive. Are you planning on buying a house, or renting? Do you mind driving a ways to get to training (and driving in heavy traffic)? What about picking up and moving to Germany for a year or two;)

I DO mind driving. Most jobs for OB/GYN's have a 4 day work week plus call (Call tends to be one 24 hour shift a week plus weekends) So, the night I'm oncall, the horses get off. 3 days a week, I ride both horses AFTER work so a long commute through heavy traffic would be "very unpleasant"

Its not practical to think that I could get a license to practice medicine in another country (although Canada would be possible) and I can't afford not to work. (Still paying off the $120k off stud loans)

CaddyM, the Germany comment was a bit tongue in cheek - most people can't do that - most of us have way too many financial and personal commitments ;) But - if you don't want to spend a lot of time driving, then you really need to decide WHO you want to train with, then decide if you can afford to live nearby. YL mentioned Rancho Santa Fe as a place she lived near San Diego. Lovely, but $$$$. If you head out where it is less $$$$, you are probably looking at a long, ardarous drive. By the way, in SoCal and parts of NorCal, 20 miles can mean two hours of driving. BUT... You can ride just about year around, there are truly BNTs everywhere, and there are many medical facilities (much better selection in SoCal).

Leslie Morse, Guenter Siedel, Steffan Peters, the list goes on and on - in SoCal. BUT... SoCal is a big region - so you couldn't move to one place and try them all without driving a LOT. I really think you need to know who you want to train with, then make that work. And the who doesn't have to be a SoCal who, there are wonderful trainers on the East Coast too. We just seem to have more of them in the "Golden State" (maybe I should call it the Tarnished State right now) because of the weather and year-round show circuit. Even in NorCal, where winters are a bit tougher (those of you on the east coast, don't laugh, I KNOW we don't know what a tough winter is), we tend to have shows running much of the year.

Dressage Art
Jul. 28, 2009, 01:05 PM
By the way, in SoCal and parts of NorCal, 20 miles can mean two hours of driving.If you don't like driving, that's a real concern. Some roads can be driven in 45 minutes with out traffic at 5 am or at 11 pm, but during the commute hours it may stretch to 2 hours or more. The commute hours are also a very long stretch of 3-5 hour blocks at the morning and at the late afternoon. The commute hours start early and end late.

I live in the CA Bay Area and my biggest complain about it = is the traffic. I hate it with passion and I'll pay extra $ for a house closer to work just to save even a 15 minutes of commute.

I had to drive to San Francisco to work and some times it was a total parking lot to get back on the freeway by the Bay Bridge, with numerous streets merging on the freeway ramp. Drivers were so rude that they would wedge themselves in between the cars and actually BUMP the cars to move them! Nobody even comes out of the car if somebody else bumped you on the bumper! Just in the couple of months, my bumpers looked like a war zone! Parking was impossible as well, during the street cleaning in SF I had to circle for 30-45 minutes just to find a parking and sometimes I would give up and just park at the sweeping zone and get a parking ticket. It got very old after several years and every time I felt like I was wasting my life sitting in traffic and my patience for traffic ran out.

If you have to be in the position where you'll have to deal with CA traffic - it's better to investigate the situation before the hand. Some people are not bothered by the long commute - yet for others it's really important

AllyB
Jul. 28, 2009, 11:32 PM
Hey there is more to Florida than Wellington! Central Florida has much to offer in terms of trainers and shows with the Wellington shows just down the road!

I lived in Los Angeles and was a working student for Charlotte. She is a terrific trainer. I imagine there are lots of not-so-big-name trainers that are excellent in nice facilities all through the area. I'd personally live out toward Thousand Oaks away from the main traffic. There is need for your speciality even in small towns!

Good luck to you and please keep us updated on your potential new residence.

lemonpoppy
Jul. 29, 2009, 12:14 AM
I'm in med school, I just bought review books for step one (which I don't take until this time next year), and I dream about this every damn day.

I'm really looking forward to more responses. Is there anywhere in the midwest that seems good?

Liz Steacie
Jul. 29, 2009, 07:19 AM
Oh go on, come to Canada :-). If you move to my town (which desperately needs an OBGYN at the moment), you would live in a very beautiful area near a major river. We have a 100+ acre farm and we are only SEVEN minutes from the hospital (the SO is a doc). You don't have scads of HMOs to deal with, just one (that would be the gov't!). We could put you up in a really nice office. Housing is reasonable. The weather, well, let's not talk about the weather. But here's the kicker - two FEI level trainers, one of whom won a Bronze medal in the Olympics and has a very successful training barn. The other has trained more than a dozen ammy riders to the FEI levels *on their own horses*, as well as numerous FEI horses. Within 5 kilometres of each other an neither one more than 10 minutes from the hospital. Both very nice facilities.

Plus, you get to live in Canada.

It's a no brainer :-)

Liz

slc2
Jul. 29, 2009, 07:34 AM
I think it's a little deceptive listing trainers most people are unlikely to have access to or to be able to afford. These people travel a great deal, they aren't all of them available to people who want to work with one person steadily, and most of them don't work a lot of evenings or cater to the schedule of the working class.

Passage2
Jul. 29, 2009, 08:43 AM
Another vote for Maryland!! The medicine is great here and still lots of beautiful horse country. The winters are fairly mild compared to MA and it's an easy plane trip to Florida and close to Devon. I think it would be a mistake to move to an area to train with one specific trainer. You should move to an area where you have lots of options. So many BNT's have their own success to focus on and travel to Europe for long periods of time, etc. What if you move for a trainer and later decide you don't like the system. You also need to consider what kind of lifestyle you want. My husband and I moved to horse country NJ and were bored to tears. We have no children and didn't fit in very well with suburbia. We now live in downtown Baltimore and love it, never a dull moment. Although you have to be willing to drive, we have Chris Hickey at Hilltop, Scott Hassler and JJ Tate at Hassler Dressage, Linda Zang and more. We also have lots of shows and clinics in the area.
Again, be careful regarding only going with the Olympic level trainers. I have a friend who moved to California to do this and found that she was slotted with the "assistant trainer" and not the Olympic level rider. This is very common practice and you must get a guarantee of how often you will get instruction from your desired trainer and who will be riding your horses when you're not there. Good Luck!

unclewiggly
Jul. 29, 2009, 08:58 AM
Maryland w/ John Hopkins to start, you have HillTop farms and Scott Hasslers new venture to name a few.
Pennsylvania w/ Philadelphia and surrounding counties full or 1st class hospitals.
Temperate climate huge selection of places for sale or boarding huge precentage of indoors and easy access to MD<DE<NJ<MD<VA and points north or south. Adn you get the change of seasons, brief hot swamp summers sure but not as progressive as deep south and not the bone chill of Mid West winters and perma frost.:yes::yes:

Sabine
Jul. 30, 2009, 01:15 AM
As I am in the middle of the exact same process (serious ammy with one baby GP horse and a very good pospect) I would definitely recommend finding a trainer FIRST then planning the move.

I, too, bless my job stability at times like this - I'm an ER RN and can get work anywhere. The harder part was relocating the husband and two kids just so I could follow my dream!! :D

I like Schwing - but prefer Schwung....
let's say like anything else in the hopefully wellknown curve of a product...haha- SoCal is sooo over rated...and I would also recommend to first shop for the trainer and then for the area...weather you can learn to live with- trainers and personalities and styles and the way the horses are treated needs to be a good "fit"- at least for me.
So look all over for a solid, hopefully fresh and hopefully intelligent and well-read international GP trainer..then go there!!....
just my 4cents...

Whitfield Farm Hanoverians
Jul. 30, 2009, 11:17 PM
Try to live in a town with at least one really TOP notch equine hospital. Very important.

Hampton Bay
Jul. 31, 2009, 12:24 AM
Lexington, KY. Several great international-level trainers, though maybe less "big name", and they get some decent clinicians. Cost of living is not outrageous, and there is a good health care system. They are also home to Rood & Riddle and Haygard. Good variety of shows within a few hours drive, you can ride year-round. Not much in the way of a commute.

But this is also coming from someone who could never imagine paying the prices to live in SoCal. And who is also thinking that it sucks that FL is DEAD between June and October.

lostislandfarm
Jul. 31, 2009, 01:07 PM
Hi Cad,

you might want to check out Cutler Farm in Medfield, Mass,(=Boston): super facility and SUPER trainers (eg Bill Warren USEF "S" judge and others), they winter in Wellington, FL - so you might get both of the worlds....And they work with Conrad Schuhmacher and George Williams on a regular basis...I'd love to be in your shoes...
Here is the website: www.cutlerfarmdressage.com
If the link does not work please contact me for cell #s!
I hope you'll find what you are looking for!

scubed
Jul. 31, 2009, 02:58 PM
I still vote for near here (of course, I'm an eventer, so it is even more true), but for dressage there is top notch training (at my barn, trainer in residence year around and an indoor for the winter), there are multiple hospitals less than 30 minutes from the barn, as well as really high end academic medical centers an hour or so away. Malpractice situation not ideal in PA, but hospitals do bear the cost. Better, I believe in Delaware. There are probably fewer top level dressage trainers in close radius here than in San Diego, but you only need one if you find one that works for you and there are more than 1 here. Also, there are lots of competitions near here. Some local trainers, though perhaps not with multiple GP horses.
www.bluehillfarmpa.com
http://www.boydandsilvamartin.com/Pages/silva/dressage.html
http://www.thedressagecenter.com/about_train.html
http://www.coolbreezefarm.com/aboutus/evelyn_susol.php


Or, you could go toward the new jersey side:
http://doversworld.com/blog/bio/
http://www.flyingchangefarm.com/

Also, some in Maryland
http://www.darkhorsedressage.com/resumes.htm
Deri Jeffers
Vanessa Swartz
Nancy Saunders Cross
http://www.coolbreezefarm.com/aboutus/evelyn_susol.php
Linda Zang