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skysthelimit4
Jul. 5, 2009, 08:28 PM
1

mroades
Jul. 5, 2009, 08:32 PM
I think you should actually judge a show before you get to say that...if often looks very different when you are the one holding the clipboard.

YankeeLawyer
Jul. 5, 2009, 08:40 PM
I think you should be happy you had a good ride and concentrate on repeating your good performance at future shows. If indeed the judge got it wrong, your results should be better another day.

wyldhorseb
Jul. 5, 2009, 08:44 PM
How would you know if you think you deserved to win any of your flat classes? You should be focused on yourself and your horse and not watching every little detail of the other riders' equitation and the horses' movement. So if you weren't doing that, how would you know, personally? Just saying..

wyldhorseb
Jul. 5, 2009, 08:44 PM
How would you know if you think you deserved to win any of your flat classes? You should be focused on yourself and your horse and not watching every little detail of the other riders' equitation and the horses' movement. So if you weren't doing that, how would you know, personally? Just saying..

Coppers mom
Jul. 5, 2009, 08:59 PM
Some judges just don't know, especially at the local level where they have to hire one judge to do a million things. I remember going to a Regional 4-H show, and I didn't place at all until my horse won the open jumping class. After that, we won every single class, even the ones *I* knew I shouldn't have done well in. Just shrug it off an be happy with your ride :yes:

Come Shine
Jul. 5, 2009, 09:07 PM
not to sound petty, but has anyone had a show were there was a judge who got it all wrong?

Just a quick FYI that there is no RIGHT answer in hunterland/eqland/medalland. It is an opinion. And in that judge's opinion, other people rode better than you did in that particular class on that particular day.

Once I had someone come up and ask why they pinned better at the end of the day. What had changed my mind from earlier in the day? Well, the answer was they stayed the same but everyone else rode worse.

Equine Adhesive
Jul. 5, 2009, 09:09 PM
Not saying this is definitely the case in your case (I wouldn't know either way, but I won't ASSUME you are wrong or scold you for watching your competition, lol), but sometimes a judge is looking for a certain look, esp. if it is a kids class (ie cute Welsh-y ponies w/ tiny kids in ribbons for SS, not 12-yr-olds who look 16 in tall boots on honies, despite the trip), or they know a trainer that frequents the show a lot with a lot of clientele, and their barn always pins high at that particular show. Happens near me constantly at 2 particular show series (1 rated, 1 county). You can either ride their whole series until they notice you, or go elsewhere. No, you shouldn't accept "this is the way it is," so gripe all you want, IMO!

Horsegal984
Jul. 5, 2009, 09:17 PM
Something you could do if you're really trying to see how you compared or what the judge saw that your trainer/other people didn't is to e-mail the show and ask for judges comments from your classes. They might not always write a lot, but anything is better than nothing, and at least you can get an idea of what that particular judge was looking for.

Cowgirl Lindz
Jul. 5, 2009, 11:44 PM
I ride a Haflinger, alot if not most judges don't even look at us. We are not the tall looking WB or TB. I've been the only one 2 do the course with no major mistakes and placed last. ie the big WB who refused placed higher then me. I actually had the man who owns the stable/ puts on the show come up to me and say "I wish I could find a judge who would not take height into consideration". Another show u could actually judge the class from the final line up not seeing anothing else. 1st place the 17.2hh...2nd 16.3....3rd 16.1 nothing under 16 placed. It was tallest to 16hh. And it was not like there where not very many under 16 either. I'm not saying I should have first place in everything, it would be just nice to be given the chance

as far as the How would you know if you should win a flat class? Maybe its just me but has anyone ever ridden in a class and tried so hard and you know that had to be one of the best rounds youve ever done! And at the end you just think that must have got me something

fourmares
Jul. 6, 2009, 01:28 AM
If you show long enough, the classes you should have won, but didn't, will be balanced with the classes you should not have won, but did. At the end of the day it's the actual ride that is important, not the ribbon.

Long Spot
Jul. 6, 2009, 01:52 AM
If you show long enough, the classes you should have won, but didn't, will be balanced with the classes you should not have won, but did. At the end of the day it's the actual ride that is important, not the ribbon.

Exactly. If you are happy with your rides, be happy with your rides. Where you placed or where you feel you should have placed doesn't take away from what you accomplished in the ring. If you had a great ride for you be happy with it and move on. Graciously.

Atypical
Jul. 6, 2009, 02:20 AM
I had a judge at the end of a hunter over fences class actually call my kid over to her and tell her that her "tie down" i.e standing martingale was illegal, and that she really should have disqualified the kid for it. She also said only martingales were allowed in jumping classes (she meant running martingales, the kid asked her). This all being said while donning her bright, shiny rodeo trophy belt buckle. Sigh. I told my kid and her parents that stuff like this happens at schooling shows, and that she should be more concerned with the quality of her ride than where she placed.

copper1
Jul. 6, 2009, 07:00 AM
this is why I usually avoid our local open shows despite the fact they are local and inexpensive! Poor facilities, lack of normal rules, and judges who don't know or understand the rules.
sometimes you win, sometimes you lose!

Sansena
Jul. 6, 2009, 07:08 AM
If your trainer was that concerned about your poor placement, she should've asked the judge why you consistently placed so badly. Matter of fact, *you* could have politely approached the judge yourself in a quiet moment and asked.

Sounds like sour grapes to me otherwise.

Heineken
Jul. 6, 2009, 07:41 AM
Hard to take you seriously with no punctuation or spelling...Learn to be a bit more grown up, in both your writing and your attitude. You'll get little to no sympathy here with that attitude and that grammar.

Coppers mom
Jul. 6, 2009, 07:51 AM
If your trainer was that concerned about your poor placement, she should've asked the judge why you consistently placed so badly. Matter of fact, *you* could have politely approached the judge yourself in a quiet moment and asked.

Are we allowed to approach judges directly? I remember something about having to go through a steward or manager or something, but it could be from a different association...

ThrushBuster
Jul. 6, 2009, 08:04 AM
What's up with all the whining lately? I've lost classes that I though I should have won, obviously the judge thought differently.
Some judges will love you, some won't. It's a competition...get over it.:eek:

Treasmare2
Jul. 6, 2009, 08:58 AM
Gooodness...we win some and lose some. It is also subjective on both the judge's part, the rider's part and the trainer's part. If you were happy with your performance then be happy....no one has a right to ribbons. There will be days you are a star and leave empty handed. There will be days you get ribbons that you don't derserve. When we get to the great ribbon heaven I am sure it is all in balance. Whining is not attractive on anyone.

FAW
Jul. 6, 2009, 09:06 AM
If you want to play hunters, then this is the mine field you have to cross. Judging is subjective, what one judge likes one week, the next judge will hate the next week. Show one horse to a judge, they will like him or her, show another horse to the same judge and they will hate him/her. Just got through playing the game for two weeks. This is life in the hunter ring.

As a show official once told me after hearing my surprise that I placed...

"You know, we don't always agree with the judge"... how true. Sorry you didn't place. Perhaps next time. Been there, done that.

Mara
Jul. 6, 2009, 09:13 AM
If you had a great ride. . .be proud you had a great ride. That's more important than a ribbon.
A friend of mine had a HOT, HOT, HOT OTTB. And he was GREEN. I never saw anyone as happy and proud as she was after his first local show. No, they didn't win a thing, but he tried so hard and behaved to the best of his ability - really, really listened to her and trusted her. Not one stop or even hesitation, although there were things everywhere that might have caused a blowup for this horse.
It was a big deal for both of them. The fact that she had evidence their partnership was really solid meant more than any ribbon.

Keep on truckin' - you'll get your share! And a good attitude gets noticed as well, if not commented upon as much as a bad one.

MHM
Jul. 6, 2009, 09:34 AM
Are we allowed to approach judges directly? I remember something about having to go through a steward or manager or something, but it could be from a different association...

At a USEF show, or any show that follows USEF rules, it is against the rules to approach a judge directly. An exhibitor must ask the steward, who will then clear it with the judge.

pony grandma
Jul. 6, 2009, 10:04 AM
I tell kids all the time - "Some days it's not your judge, so ride for that one horseman on the rail who will see you and know that you did good and that you were a good partner with your horse."

I've chased down many disappointed, or confused, kids and told them that they had a good ride. Their parents sometimes hear me and thank me for speaking up.

Your coach knew, you knew. But it is just what it is and tomorrow's another day. Good luck and chin up.

Janet
Jul. 6, 2009, 10:07 AM
As Jimmy Wofford says
"Sometimes you are the dog, sometimes you are the hydrant"

Even with objecitve disciplines, there are times you do great and don't get a ribbon, and times you have problems and still place.

And that is even more so with subjective judging.

Over the years, with subjective disciplines, there are as many times that I got ribbons _I_ didn't think I deserved as times I thought I was going to get something and didn't.

As long as you are respectful, and clear it with the steward (if there is one) first, it can be very educational to talk to the judge. Three cases I remember.

1 - Took a HOT but green eventer/jumper to a (unrec)hunter show for mileage, and entered an equitation class. Half way round she started rushing. For the rest of the class I forgot about my equitation, and just focused on making sure she did NOT leave out a stride in front of each fence. We pinned third. I spoke to the judge, saying "I thought that was pretty awful, how did I get third?" He said "Yes, it was pretty bad, but some of the others were worse, and at least you were trying to do something about it."

2 - Took Music in a hunter class at a local show. There were only two of us in the 3' class. The other horse was short strided, jumping flat, and clearly not comfortable at 3'. I thought Music jumped much better. We got second. I politely asked the judge, and she said "your horse was a MUCH better jumper, but your horse gave a small buck in the lead change, so I had to put you second". I learned something - I didn't realize a single bad lead change could negate 8 good jumps, but it can.

3 - Took Belle in a Connemara hack class (flat plus 2 fences) at Upperville. Belle does NOT move like a hunter, so I wasn't expecting to do great. But she jumped well and some of the others "almost stopped" or got in REALLY crooked, so I was somewhat surprized to be second to last (only in front of the pony with two refusals). I asked the steward, and got permission to see the card, but not to talk to the judge. I forgot what it said, but it was something that made no sense to me (maybe "chipped" when I thought she maybe "jumped a little long"). OK, it is subjective. You don't have to agree with it, but you have to accept it with good grace.

Schune
Jul. 6, 2009, 10:32 AM
not to sound petty, but has anyone had a show were there was a judge who got it all wrong?


Sorry, but that's a fail.

If you can't handle a discipline where judging can be subjective, and/or you don't have a tolerance for not winning... find something else.

rileyt
Jul. 6, 2009, 10:35 AM
i came out and my trainor was pissed. she said that there was no reason at all that i shouldnt have won- i DESERVED to win that and that i should have won that class.

Lucky for you, I had my prunes this morning, so I am going to ignore the mockery of the English language you are creating...

But...

If your "trainor" is telling you that there is no reason at all that you shouldn't have won -- that you deserved to win and absolutely should have won the class... I'd probably look for a new trainer. Either the trainer doesn't get it (because there just isn't much that is for certain in hunterland), or else she is feeding you a line and contributing to your unreasonable expectations and sense of misplaced moral outrage.

Finally, I think you should try wearing jodhpurs at the next show. Not only are they appropriate for children your age, but, apparently, they might improve your chances.

theoldgreymare
Jul. 6, 2009, 10:43 AM
If you show long enough, the classes you should have won, but didn't, will be balanced with the classes you should not have won, but did. At the end of the day it's the actual ride that is important, not the ribbon.

I tell my kids this all the time. You are paying for one person's subjective opinion, whether you agree with it or not. Accept the pinnings graciously and try to move past what you think you should have placed and take something away from the day's ride that is positive. Every ride is a learning experience whether you pin or not.

GreystoneKC
Jul. 6, 2009, 11:11 AM
I'm sorry but I can't even take you seriously with such bad spelling and grammar...
However, I second what almost everyone else is saying.

Love the "some days you're the dog, some days you're the hydrant"! I've never heard that one!

We generally use, "some days you eat the bear, some days the bear eats you"! LOL

In judged sports, you know know what you're going to get!

danosaur
Jul. 6, 2009, 12:06 PM
my first reaction is that your equitation probably isn't as great as you think it is. In a flat class, the difference between first and second doesn't have to be very much. But the difference between first and nothing, especially at a more local show, is pretty big. Clearly you WERE doing something wrong on the flat, even if you don't know it. Have someone video you when you ride so you can figure out what the problem is. A lot of people think their eq is fine when it's really not, and bad eq is very distracting, no matter how good the actual trip is.

lesson junkie
Jul. 6, 2009, 12:36 PM
I read this in a Western Horseman magazine a while back.

An exhibitor approached a judge, wanting to know why a particular horse was placed over hers. The judge listened to the woman make her case, including a list of the winning horse's mistakes. He thought for a second, then replied, "Well, the winner did it wrong better than you did it right".

Just be glad you had good trips, If your rides had been below your ability, and you still won, would you be satisfied with your effort?

RxCate
Jul. 6, 2009, 12:45 PM
I had this happen to me once.. But I had a right to be pissed.

It was a local 'B' show and I was doing the greenies with my appendix.. Jumped both rounds beautifully, she thankfully was an auto changer so I know we had all our leads, didn't knock or chip anything and hit all the correct striding...It wasn't a big class, I think only 5 of us, and I watched everyone's rounds, they all either missed leads or knocked rails.

I ended up 3rd or 5th can't remember.. Boy was I pissed. The other competitors who placed higher, but knocked rails were even pissed, it was completely beligerent judging.

Come to find out, they had literally pulled this girl off the street. She was a friend of the woman running the show and didn't ride herself.

We were PO'd to the max.

spmoonie
Jul. 6, 2009, 12:50 PM
Lucky for you, I had my prunes this morning, so I am going to ignore the mockery of the English language you are creating...

But...

If your "trainor" is telling you that there is no reason at all that you shouldn't have won -- that you deserved to win and absolutely should have won the class... I'd probably look for a new trainer. Either the trainer doesn't get it (because there just isn't much that is for certain in hunterland), or else she is feeding you a line and contributing to your unreasonable expectations and sense of misplaced moral outrage.

Finally, I think you should try wearing jodhpurs at the next show. Not only are they appropriate for children your age, but, apparently, they might improve your chances.


:lol::lol: Very well stated.

GreystoneKC
Jul. 6, 2009, 02:24 PM
I think the truth of the matter is that "poop happens".

There are some judges that are not all that good.
There are some judges that have things they hit harder for than other judges (say rubs or late changes).
There are some judges who can show the occasional bit of favouratism.
There are some judges that just don't really like your horse as much as you do (whether it's because they like TBs not WBs or vice versa, don't like apps/pintos/etc, think it jumps poorly or moves like a can opener...).
But on any given day, at any given horse show, the vast majority of judges DO know what they are doing and do it well. They all have their little preferences that might lead to a shift in placing up or down, but they do a good job.

Everyone who competes at horse shows has days where they pinned better than they deserved to pin, pinned worse than they deserved to pin, pinned right where they should have pinned, etc. I doubt any one of us CAN'T recall a time where they've walked away from the ring thinking or complaining to a barnmate, "I really should have pinned higher in that class I think..." or "I was robbed today". I think the difference is in how you handle it.

In addition, remember, if you didn't sit there and watch EVERY trip, you can't KNOW how it "should" have been.

Long Spot
Jul. 6, 2009, 02:56 PM
I read this in a Western Horseman magazine a while back.

He thought for a second, then replied, "Well, the winner did it wrong better than you did it right".



:lol: That's great!

I agree with the suggestion to maybe find a new trainer. Not because you didn't pin, but because a good/great trainer has a way of teaching sportsmanship when needed as well.

trubandloki
Jul. 6, 2009, 03:01 PM
If you show long enough, the classes you should have won, but didn't, will be balanced with the classes you should not have won, but did. At the end of the day it's the actual ride that is important, not the ribbon.


Very well said fourmares!

You are paying for the judges opinion. The placings in the class are that, their opinion. Nothing more, nothing less. That is how it works.

reefy!
Jul. 6, 2009, 03:08 PM
i DESERVED to win that


Well, I *deserve* to win all my classes when I ride well, too, at least in my own mind ;) (I paid my dues, worked hard, wah, wah, wah). But sometimes you don't. That's life, especially at a horse show :yes:

EquitationRider
Jul. 6, 2009, 03:26 PM
horse shows are not about how well you place but about how much you learn and showing off what you have learned. think of it like taking a test...you dont take a test to see if u can get a better score than somebody eles, you take a test you take a test to show how much you have learned and were you need improvment.
Think hard about what the other riders did that you didn't that could of made them place above you. Think about the mistakes you may of made and learn from them!
Good Luck at your next show!

iridehorses
Jul. 6, 2009, 07:24 PM
i won a hack once when my pony was cantering during the walk, bucking, etc. =] hahaha
judge had to be blind, or only saw the good parts since there were 20+ other ponies

hellerkm
Jul. 6, 2009, 07:30 PM
If you show long enough, the classes you should have won, but didn't, will be balanced with the classes you should not have won, but did. At the end of the day it's the actual ride that is important, not the ribbon.
LOL!!!!! soooo true, hysterical but TRUE!!!:lol::lol::lol:

Whisper
Jul. 6, 2009, 10:20 PM
Hmm, it could be poor judging, but more likely, you didn't do what the judge wanted, for whatever reason, since you didn't place at all. If your instructor feels you deserved to win, can she explain what the top 5 people did wrong/worse than you? Some instructors will say things like that to try to make their client feel better, even if it is stretching the truth.

desert_rat
Jul. 7, 2009, 11:33 AM
I have to agree with the other posters, that some days are going to be in your I also agree, that if you had a good ride and you were happy with your performance, know that you did your best and graciously accept your pinnings.

I have seen some local show mgt pull people at the last minute to judge a ring (judge late, absent etc)that are not qualified to be judging and there are some pretty blatant mistakes in pinning etc. I expect my riders to accept the pinnings in a sportsmanship manner and know that as long as they performed to the best of their ability - that is what counts.

In addition to the subjective nature of hunter/eq judging is that judges do make honest mistakes and they cannot see everything. I judged a local show last year with 10 horses in a big ring. At the end of the class (schooling break followed), a trainer asked if I realized that the horse I pinned 1st had picked up the wrong lead. Nope - sure didn't. She went on to clarify that the horse only took 2 strides and was opposite of where my eye was. It was her horse! It happens....My horse broke in a hunter u/s class for a couple of steps....judge was looking elsewhere...2nd out of 8.

Win some, lose some - it will balance out. If you and your trainer were unhappy with the judging, then you always have the option of not showing under that judge again.

magnolia73
Jul. 7, 2009, 01:03 PM
OMG! u r like the first person evaH that this has happened 2! id be To2ly po'd 2!

Not to be mean, but just about every monday or tuesday there is a topic like this. Whether its the A show where the judge just KNEW those were not TS's or someone showing a palomino at a paint show and getting last in english pleasure, beaten by horses in western tack....

It happens all the time and is a part of showing- learning to elegantly accept bad decisions and move on and continue improving yourself. If all you want are ribbons, much cheaper just to order them than to win them. If you want to learn to improve, look to what you can improve for the next time out.

dani0303
Jul. 7, 2009, 04:27 PM
I've been jipped in classes that I should have place, and also placed when I didn't deserve to.

It all evens out in the end. Judges are only human and they do make mistakes.

bascher
Jul. 7, 2009, 09:44 PM
I've been jipped in classes that I should have place, and also placed when I didn't deserve to.

It all evens out in the end. Judges are only human and they do make mistakes.

Bravo! And may I add that before you decide that you were jipped, you should watch the ENTIRE class, every trip, first. Then and only then can you make a valid statement about the places, and even so, the judges have a different vantage point than anyone watching.

mrsbradbury
Jul. 7, 2009, 09:49 PM
Are we allowed to approach judges directly? I remember something about having to go through a steward or manager or something, but it could be from a different association...

Please do not ever approach a judge directly. It is in poor taste, ask permission from a steward, or get management to escort you.

1. We don't know you're coming, and that "quiet" moment is probably when I am setting up cards for my next division, resting my brain, or reviewing my results.

2. If we are seen conversing with you without additional staff, it allows people who think the judge is the "bad guy"; to accuse us of being biased, or actually knowing a competitor.

I was judging a horse show where, a nice little girl ambushed me in the judge's box, wanting to kow why she didn't get a ribbon in her over fences class. Well... she was off course, and I no longer had the cards, the office did; she was arguing with me. Whole time it held up the horse show, made her and I uncomfortable, and was just inapporpriate all around. Her "trainer" sent her ask me.

hunter1985
Jul. 7, 2009, 11:34 PM
I show in the A level and C level horseshows, as well as local shows for the "greenies". At all levels I have always heard someone gripe or complain about the judge. It is just part of the horseshow world.
I get SO sick and tired of people in my barn who whine and moan about the judge when they dont do well. I appreciate the riders who come to the shows and ride well and dont complain if they didn't place the way they should've or wanted to.
Just remember your attiutude affects everyone around you. You should set a positive example for your barn, trainer, and other clients at your barn. Your attitude affects a lot more people than you think.

akrogirl
Jul. 8, 2009, 12:18 AM
Otoh, sometimes the ring guy just takes the results down wrong!

One time I had a really good round in one class but didn't place, even though one of my friends placed with a refusal. I had also seen all the other rounds and this was one of those rare occasions where we were as close to perfect as we could get, whereas all the other rides had signifcant errors. There were also only five or six of us in the class so I should have received a ribbon of some sort. I questioned the ring guy and asked if he would please double check with the judge. He took some persuading but he finally radio'd the judge to verify the results and, yes, I had won the class! The judge was probably busy with her paperwork and didn't catch the error when the results were announced.

I'm not saying that this is a frequent occurance but I doubt if I am the only person this has happened to. My trainer was once called in third place in a class she wasn't even in, so mistakes do happen on occasion!

dghunter
Jul. 8, 2009, 08:26 AM
I was placed 6/6 in a flat class once and the judge stood up and started yelling about how that was wrong, I ended up getting first :lol:

magnolia73
Jul. 8, 2009, 08:33 AM
One time I had a really good round in one class but didn't place, even though one of my friends placed with a refusal. I had also seen all the other rounds and this was one of those rare occasions where we were as close to perfect as we could get, whereas all the other rides had signifcant errors. There were also only five or six of us in the class so I should have received a ribbon of some sort. I questioned the ring guy and asked if he would please double check with the judge. He took some persuading but he finally radio'd the judge to verify the results and, yes, I had won the class! The judge was probably busy with her paperwork and didn't catch the error when the results were announced.

That happened to me once- I won a hack.....on an eggbeater and immediately shot a glance over to my friend on her "10" mover and was like OMG, is she OK? Yeah.... they read the results backwards.

Everythingbutwings
Jul. 8, 2009, 08:48 AM
There are puzzling occasions. I recall watching a class of four where the second place horse in both O/F classes had gone off course - didn't even finish the second O/F round. The rider, when congratulated on her reserve by the secretary as she paid for the day, was astonished and said to them she'd been disqualified.

Made mental note: Never show under that judge. We've actually avoided shows run by the same management.

findeight
Jul. 8, 2009, 11:41 AM
Bad or ignorant judging aside...and it happens. Everywhere.

OP...you said you were perfect and your "trainor" said you were perfect?

40 years I have been showing, I have NEVER ever left the ring without thinking of something I could have done better or some mistake or other I should not have made-even with a tri color in hand.

And I have never, ever been told by any trainer I was perfect nor have I heard anybody else's trainer tell them they were perfect unless they were, like, 5 years old on a fat 30 year old Pony. "Good" is about as good as it gets-with a later reminder of something that was not so good or could have been a little sharper/cleaner/quicker/smoother despite winning that class.

Good riders are always working to improve on their last trip or class-not resting on their own estimation of perfection or listening to a trainer who should be teaching riders to be aware of every little mistake and strive to get better. You think you are on top, you stop learning.

gottagrey
Jul. 8, 2009, 01:38 PM
There is a woman who used to judge near me who was horrible. One time a friend was showing her new, frisky horse.. horse quit the first jump twice (which was the judge's line) then got almost through the course but quit the 2nd to last jump; it was a schooling show so her trainer yelled keep going - so for some reason she jumped the entire outside line of fences again.. huh? anyway for the heck of it a bunch of us decided to clap & cheer like crazy (low key fun show)... somehow she got a 2nd!! We figured the judge went by applause meters; not jumping skill.

Another time, I had new horse - another schooling show w/ well know n"R" judge. We go in and my horse decides to quit this "snake" jump.. about 3 times, no whistle out, so we try again.. I think on the 5th time we got over; then another fellow was on his green horse which jumped 2 fences, parked reared wouldn't budge rider left the ring not completing the course... there were about 10 horses in that class both of us got ribbons! WHAT; and the guy that left the ring after jumping only 2 fences placed above me - at least my horse made it around... We were the only 2 horses that had pathetic rounds. That guy should stick w/being a steward and not a judge.

On the flip side; I was at a rated show this weekend - equitation. There were 8 kids in the class. Any 8 of them could have easily won the class.. they were all lovely riders with very little to separate them from top to bottom placings. Sometimes thats how classes go sometimes it's the best of the worst, sometimes if the best of the best.. you have to take it with a grain of salt. Often too a judge sees things from a totally different angle/perspective than a trainer at the in-gate, or a rider... I remember riding what I felt was the trip of a lifetime, the rider than won ate nearly every jump and I didn't pin at all. I was heartsick - not that I didn't win or place but that how could something that felt so wonderful not look as good as it felt?

Keep your chin up.

LShipley
Jul. 8, 2009, 03:42 PM
Set goals for yourself at each show. It IS disappointing not to receive a ribbon when you have had a really good trip. At one show, my trainer put me in a flat class and said, "Listen, you are riding against some pros on really fancy movers, so this class is just for practice. I watched this judge yesterday, and your horse doesn't really move the way that she seems to likes. But it's just for practice - I want to let your horse stretch out her neck, and I want you to get the right lead". She was right - we didn't place, but we rode so well that she made me go double check at the in-gate that my number hadn't been called. That alone made me proud.

I always ask my trainer to help me set goals for myself at each show, and as long as I reach those goals, both she and I feel like my mare and I are improving our showing ability. This way, your show can be a success no matter what.

AppendixQHLover
Jul. 8, 2009, 03:56 PM
Sit with a judge sometimes as an assitant. It is a hard job and they don't always see everything. I sat with a judge that looked at one corner and that was it. There were horses flipping out all over the place but she didn't see them. So they placed.

If I do better each show skill wise and accomlplish some sort of goal that is a good day. This weekend my goal is to get through my jumping classes getting all my leads, and not forgetting my course. IF I get a ribbon great, if I don't and I do all my goals even better.

Showing horses is supposed to be fun not getting worked up over a ribbon. Ribbons are great but they are only .50 piece of fabric. IF you are happy with your rides and so is your trainer. Get a prize from the tack store and tell yourself it is your personal goal trophy.

I have also seen grown women throw complete tantrums about the placings. It isn't worth it. The grown up thing to do is congratulate the winner and tell yourself it was someone else's day to win.

skysthelimit4
Jul. 8, 2009, 04:42 PM
I tell kids all the time - "Some days it's not your judge, so ride for that one horseman on the rail who will see you and know that you did good and that you were a good partner with your horse."

I've chased down many disappointed, or confused, kids and told them that they had a good ride. Their parents sometimes hear me and thank me for speaking up.

Your coach knew, you knew. But it is just what it is and tomorrow's another day. Good luck and chin up.

thank u very much:) i know that i (he) was awesome, and i greatly appreciate that. it just gets a little frustrating. thank you so much for the nice comment:)

skysthelimit4
Jul. 8, 2009, 04:45 PM
my first reaction is that your equitation probably isn't as great as you think it is. In a flat class, the difference between first and second doesn't have to be very much. But the difference between first and nothing, especially at a more local show, is pretty big. Clearly you WERE doing something wrong on the flat, even if you don't know it. Have someone video you when you ride so you can figure out what the problem is. A lot of people think their eq is fine when it's really not, and bad eq is very distracting, no matter how good the actual trip is.

thank you for the advice- i will try it.:)

skysthelimit4
Jul. 8, 2009, 04:48 PM
Well, I *deserve* to win all my classes when I ride well, too, at least in my own mind ;) (I paid my dues, worked hard, wah, wah, wah). But sometimes you don't. That's life, especially at a horse show :yes:

i agree with what you have to say (even if it dosen't sound like i did). haha... i can relate to the first sentance:winkgrin:

skysthelimit4
Jul. 8, 2009, 04:50 PM
horse shows are not about how well you place but about how much you learn and showing off what you have learned. think of it like taking a test...you dont take a test to see if u can get a better score than somebody eles, you take a test you take a test to show how much you have learned and were you need improvment.
Think hard about what the other riders did that you didn't that could of made them place above you. Think about the mistakes you may of made and learn from them!
Good Luck at your next show!

thank you! i am hoping that we have the same great ride next weekend:)

Everythingbutwings
Jul. 9, 2009, 07:01 AM
Sit with a judge sometimes as an assitant. It is a hard job and they don't always see everything.

If you get a chance, audit a Judge's Clinic. I went to one down at Deep Run Hunt Club a couple years ago and it was illuminating. The major discussion was focused on keeping scoring consistent and fair across the board. :yes:

FAW
Jul. 9, 2009, 09:08 AM
I have a trainer that told me before I started showing that there will be rounds that I felt were really good and won't place. She said when that happens, not to change a thing in the ride, that the others just had a better ride and that the difference in scores was probably very close, Only one person can win and 6-7 runnerups.

smay
Jul. 9, 2009, 09:34 AM
...you don't know how much that means to kids when a rail observer or otherwise "stranger" tells them "good trip," after they haven't won anything....again. I tell my kid "different day, different judge" ALL the time, because sometimes the judges love her on her little Morgan, and other days she couldn't place on him if every other horse in the class fell down flat! haha After observing how much that means to kids to be commended on nice riding, or "cute pony" or even "fantastic recovery!" ...I try to do it ALL the time.

One show in particular I remember thinking "what on earth?" It was POURING rain, the ring was full of pretty deep puddles, and everyone's tack and clothing was just drenched. They didn't delay a thing..the judge was sitting in a booth nice and dry. Our Morgan pony LOVES the water and cantered around happily, ears pricked around every course, splashing down happily on the correct lead, swapping through the puddles, straight as an arrow through the lines.. EVERYONE else had refusals, breaks to trot, wrong leads, bucking, leaping puddles, and ears flat against their heads! haha Pony didn't place. HUH????

Later one "mom" told my daughter "beautiful riding and your pony is a star" but that the judge was simply placing the same horses from earlier in the day when it was drier... She had pretty much stopped judging during the rain and was just sitting it out. So we still went home happy because of that one mom's comment.