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Mudder
Jul. 5, 2009, 12:01 PM
After many years off, I got back into riding about 6 months ago. I had primarily ridden dressage before, but now I'm taking hunter jumper lessons. I bought my horse in Feb.

Friday, I took him over an X twice and he was good... jumps a little high, but canters nicely away. So, I had hubby put the rail straight and I get dumped after the jump... He was 'flimming' it with our camera, so I won't say more since you can just watch it for yourself. Did I do something to cause the reaction after the jump?? I know I let him rush too much and I wasn't expecting for him to jump that high....

http://pets.webshots.com/video/3001671590105169681pzHYmv

Equine Adhesive
Jul. 5, 2009, 12:24 PM
A few things stand out...

1. He looks off when he is trotting in the video. It is not a lot of footage, so maybe he is not, but he does not look sound at the trot. It could be possible that his reaction after jumping was due to pain.

2. Does this horse know how to jump? Based just one the 1 jump (again, not a lot of info, but based on what you posted), he does not appear to know how to jump (he thrusted himself over a very small obstacle in a large jump instead of jumping it normally). So, it could also be a "greenie" moment where he is excited after going over the jump.

3. You said he rushed, but in fact he lacks impulsion. Enough impulsion will make his trick after the fence a little harder to do (provided you keep your leg on, eyes up, and don't let him get his head down between his legs).

Good luck!

joiedevie99
Jul. 5, 2009, 12:30 PM
It looks like a combination of green horse and green rider. It looks like your lower leg isn't as secure as it should be, and you anticipated and leaned up his neck. It's hard to tell whether he thought he should worry because you were tense and jumping up his neck, or he realized he could take advantage of you in a vulnerable position. The most likely scenario though is that you kicked him in the flanks when your leg slid back and it bothered him. Don't be discouraged, but 6 months back isn't the saddle just doesn't seem to be enough time to build up the leg strength and base of support you need to jump. Go back to trot poles and posting trot with no stirrups until your leg is solid enough to let your upper body stay with him without compromising your base of support.

I would let your trainer jump him so he learns that its all about and stick to working on basics. Then I would start learning to jump on another horse that is going to let you make beginner mistakes without taking advantage.

Mudder
Jul. 5, 2009, 12:42 PM
A few things stand out...

1. He looks off when he is trotting in the video. It is not a lot of footage, so maybe he is not, but he does not look sound at the trot. It could be possible that his reaction after jumping was due to pain.

He doesn't feel like he is off when I ride him and when I see him in the pasture he doesn't apprear off... he does have some old scars from an old barbed wire injury... perhaps it causes him some problems? I think I have a video of him just trotting taken later than I can upload...


2. Does this horse know how to jump? Based just one the 1 jump (again, not a lot of info, but based on what you posted), he does not appear to know how to jump (he thrusted himself over a very small obstacle in a large jump instead of jumping it normally). So, it could also be a "greenie" moment where he is excited after going over the jump.

His previous owner jumped him, so I'd say he does, but then when I bought him I didn't ask her a lot of question concerning jumping since I was just getting back into riding at the time. He jumps Xs in the same manner - it feel like he hurls himself over something tiny.


3. You said he rushed, but in fact he lacks impulsion. Enough impulsion will make his trick after the fence a little harder to do (provided you keep your leg on, eyes up, and don't let him get his head down between his legs).


I guess I felt like he rushed a bit since I let him break into canter before the jump, instead of keeping him at trot.


joiedevie99, I am pretty green at jumping so he and I should probably just stick with the flat work.

Whisper
Jul. 5, 2009, 12:53 PM
On the rushing vs. impulsion thing, since you've done dressage before, I'm sure you know that the horse can get quick (propulsion) without having impulsion (actually using their hind end correctly, moving with power). He's getting on his forehand, which makes him *feel* faster/stronger, from what little I can see in the video. Also, when I've jumped before, if the horse gets a little tense in the back and neck, they feel like they're going fast, even if their objective speed (mpm) is very slow.

Even if he knows how to jump, I'd say he definitely needs a refresher before *you* try to jump him. It's possible he did a little bit with a good rider, several years ago (or wasn't really trained, just hopped over, and they were happy with that). If you're going to jump at this point, you want a horse partner who will pack you around and be forgiving of beginner mistakes. Does your instructor have a school horse who you can take a few jumping lessons on? More flatwork is definitely good, but you'll still be a beginner at *jumping*. The skillset is a bit different. Do you do a lot of 2-point on the flat on your own as well as in lessons?

Foxtrot's
Jul. 5, 2009, 12:55 PM
Ouch. It is hard to tell from that. If you didn't lose balance and yank him around while trying to save yourself, I'd guess it was an evasion. He probably felt you were not that tight in the saddle and not keeping him in the railway lines with hand and leg. We don't know if he is young, green, fresh, etc. Back to poles on the ground with your trainer I guess!! Grids are the perfect way to help out a rider and horse.

cute_lil_fancy_pants_pony
Jul. 5, 2009, 12:59 PM
After many years off, I got back into riding about 6 months ago. I had primarily ridden dressage before, but now I'm taking hunter jumper lessons. I bought my horse in Feb.

Friday, I took him over an X twice and he was good... jumps a little high, but canters nicely away. So, I had hubby put the rail straight and I get dumped after the jump... He was 'flimming' it with our camera, so I won't say more since you can just watch it for yourself. Did I do something to cause the reaction after the jump?? I know I let him rush too much and I wasn't expecting for him to jump that high....

http://pets.webshots.com/video/3001671590105169681pzHYmv

As you go over the "fence" your lower leg slips way back and tickles him in the flank. I think I would react the same way if I was your horse. :)

faraway46
Jul. 5, 2009, 01:38 PM
No worries. You just got ahead and maybe bothered him with your leg going too back, although in my opinion it's that mixed with a little freshness (by the way, he seems to have a very nice bounce in him!! congrats!). He had a mean spin there and I think if he ever tries that again (even just once) get a pro to ride him and let him know that that's a no-no! A little freshness like that can turn into a mean vice and just after a jump is when the rider is most vulnerable to spins and direction changes. Try to keep your eyes up, your body staight (almost vertical) when you do your first jumps and use your outside rein to keep him straight if he tries to spin. All this with impulsion, that you will be able to provide because you will be straighter in the saddle and have your seat contact quicker to make him go forward right after the jump. Tighten your legs just before the jump and try to pull your seat in.
Hope this helps,
Viv

Coppers mom
Jul. 5, 2009, 02:16 PM
Along with what everyone else said, I too think that he looks lame. Did you have him vetted when you bought him? He's quite short in the right hind, which I'm sure is being exaggerated by his lacking impulsion, but I would definitely have that checked out.

Mudder
Jul. 5, 2009, 02:36 PM
Thanks everyone for the input... after it happened, I thought: Gosh, I should have stuck with Dressage!

For those who think he looks off, here is another video that is longer... I apologize for the quality - it looks good on my computer but when I upload it it seems poor quality.

http://pets.webshots.com/video/3048488600105169681BdcBfP

Whisper
Jul. 5, 2009, 02:58 PM
Yes, he looks short-strided on that right hind in the second video, to me. It doesn't necessarily mean he's in pain per se - there are some horses with chronic conditions who are cleared by the vet to work, and indeed, are sounder *in* light work than not. However, jumping may not be a good idea. One of the horses I ride for free on the weekends has weak stifles, so he can't jump. He's actually fine most of the time, but sometimes is a little creakier than usual. He trailrides a lot, and hillwork is especially good for him, but sometimes he just doesn't track up as much on that left hind. On those days, we walk only, or I put him back up if he doesn't warm up out of it pretty quickly. It's not nearly as obvious as with your horse, though.

Coppers mom
Jul. 5, 2009, 03:13 PM
Yeah, he's definitely off. It may be something serious, or it may be something as simple as him needing a couple chiropractic adjustments. One of the horses at the barn will get short behind when his pelvis goes out. A vet will be able to give you a better idea of what will help him.

cute_lil_fancy_pants_pony
Jul. 5, 2009, 03:19 PM
Yea, he looks about 2+ to 3 outta 5 lame. I would like to see a video of him going in the other direction though to confirm.

slc2
Jul. 5, 2009, 03:25 PM
He doesn't look even but that isn't why you fell off or why he spun around. He just looks fresh and unschooled. He came into the fence looking really fresh and tight.

enjoytheride
Jul. 5, 2009, 03:34 PM
He isn't forward enough to the fence so on the landing side he stops and bucks (I think you catch him a bit in the face which might not be helping).

If he is sound you need to be going forward to your fence so that he jumps across and not up. You also need to be forward on landing. So give him a smooch, put your leg on immedietly, and gallop on. This works if your leg is secure and under you and you have a proper fold that keeps you down in the saddle without jumping ahead.

Beenthere
Jul. 5, 2009, 03:41 PM
Is this horse a saddlebred? He looks sore on the left hock to me in the little amount of tape but a horse that can stop dead in his tracks and pulls those antics is probably sound. Frankly he looks lit and not at all broke enough to be jumping. His head is stuck in the air and you are far to loose to ride that horse over jumps.

Definitely get a trainer to put the jump on that horse so you dont get hurt....ps, that horse was very good at what he did which makes me think he has a history of this crap

SillyMe
Jul. 5, 2009, 03:42 PM
Sorry you fell off. That horse was no where near ready to jump. Totally not paying attention and definitely looked very fresh to me.

You crawled up his neck about 3 strides before the jump and he just didn't know what to do. The spin was kind of "naughty" to me...

My friends call me a broken record...no jumping until your horse is broke, broke, broke. Lucky you, you have dressage background! Make sure the horse follows directions no matter what on the flat, before you jump anything.

Take your time, get balanced and confident, then have fun.

cute_lil_fancy_pants_pony
Jul. 5, 2009, 03:43 PM
Is this horse a saddlebred? He looks sore on the left hock to me in the little amount of tape but a horse that can stop dead in his tracks and pulls those antics is probably sound. Frankly he looks lit and not at all broke enough to be jumping. His head is stuck in the air and you are far to loose to ride that horse over jumps.

Definitely get a trainer to put the jump on that horse so you dont get hurt....ps, that horse was very good at what he did which makes me think he has a history of this crap

My horse was VERY lame and would do all sorts of amazing gymnastics and airs above the ground cause he was on stall rest for months!

Candle
Jul. 5, 2009, 03:52 PM
You can analyze it all you want personally, but I feel like the bottom line is that he wasn't listening to you at ALL coming into the fence. If you're going to do any jumping on your own, incorporate ground poles into your dressage/flatwork but with a horse looking to do something dumb like that, I wouldn't jump without a trainer on the ground so you don't lose your confidence and get lost in a downward spiral of fear/misbehavior. It's pretty easy to start second-guessing your every move over the jump, when what you really need is solid flatwork, an obedient horse, and a smack on the ass for him when he spins around like that. It's a teeny jump. You should be able to have a small seizure over a jump like that and he STILL shouldn't go off like he did. JMHO, take it or leave it.

kookicat
Jul. 5, 2009, 04:00 PM
He looks off to me too.

He was very sticky going into that fence. You should've circled him and got him going forward a lot more.

Hope you're not too sore! :)

cute_lil_fancy_pants_pony
Jul. 5, 2009, 04:11 PM
You can analyze it all you want personally, but I feel like the bottom line is that he wasn't listening to you at ALL coming into the fence.

I instead of "he wasn't listening to you at ALL" I would say that the rider did not effectively prepare the horse and communicate to the horse coming into the fence, and there lacks some basic training.


" If you're going to do any jumping on your own, incorporate ground poles into your dressage/flatwork but with a horse looking to do something dumb like that, I wouldn't jump without a trainer on the ground so you don't lose your confidence and get lost in a downward spiral of fear/misbehavior. It's pretty easy to start second-guessing your every move over the jump, when what you really need is solid flatwork, an obedient horse, and a smack on the ass for him when he spins around like that."

Why smack a horse on the ass AFTER it does a normal horse behavior? How about reward and encourage good behavior, and don't put you or your horse in a situation where bad behavior is going to happen. And ignore bad behavior when you accidently put the horse in a situation where he reacts in a way you don't want. The horse knows how to be a horse after all, its the rider that needs to learn how to be a rider.

" It's a teeny jump. You should be able to have a small seizure over a jump like that and he STILL shouldn't go off like he did. JMHO, take it or leave it."

andylover
Jul. 5, 2009, 04:15 PM
just a quick glance and i saw you leaning prior to the fence and also after the fence. may have been the cause. just my humble guess..

beenanddone
Jul. 5, 2009, 04:16 PM
Looks to me that you are correct that he did rush the fence. However, it looks like you got nervous and went into 2-point three strides out which would have been fine considering your greenness over fences, but when you got to the jump you pushed yourself way ahead. Common mistake for someone learning to jump. After the jump it looks like he landed short after feeling you ahead and stung his feet....and was pissed! haha...Good Luck learning and with a new horse! It only takes a couple of those for you not to do the same thing again :)

JustJump
Jul. 5, 2009, 04:16 PM
What stands out to me is that he took complete advantage of your lack of control after the fence, and seemed to know just how to do it. I'm with donkeyman, thinking that he might not be as sore as some think, being able to pull a move like that.

If you don't already know how to jump, a horse that will do that sort of thing is NOT the one you want to be learning on. If you did something to cause it, he's just too sensitive--you don't want a reactive horse for a novice in order to avoid the consequence you experienced.

Work with a pro if possible to iron out his behavior and allow you to learn without fear that making a small mistake will land you in the hospital.

Coppers mom
Jul. 5, 2009, 04:57 PM
What stands out to me is that he took complete advantage of your lack of control after the fence, and seemed to know just how to do it. I'm with donkeyman, thinking that he might not be as sore as some think, being able to pull a move like that.

I agree that the spin after jumping was probably just him being a big fat ass about it, but the lameness still shouldn't be ignored.

I would get a vet out, and then get someone on him who's not afraid to whip his head around so he's straight and give him a good spank to get him going away from the fence.

Cita
Jul. 5, 2009, 05:01 PM
If you don't already know how to jump, a horse that will do that sort of thing is NOT the one you want to be learning on.

...

Work with a pro if possible to iron out his behavior and allow you to learn without fear that making a small mistake will land you in the hospital.

:yes::yes::yes:

The horse pulled a really dirty move, and whether you did something to cause it or not, that's not a horse on which that *I* would risk learning (or re-learning) how to jump! Really, it's expected to mess up when you're learning - it's expected that your legs will slide back sometimes, that you will throw yourself forward, that you might lean, or catch the horse in the mouth, etc. That's why God gave us saintly schoolies - to be patient with us while we learned how NOT to do that stuff. :winkgrin:

Time to call in the trainer! :yes:

Bubba Boo
Jul. 5, 2009, 05:16 PM
I agree with Cida, I didn't like the dirty spin after he landed. Yes you were forward and landed on his neck, but his reaction was uncalled for.
If you want to work with this horse, you need an experienced trainer. I would suggest you stop jumping this horse by yourself and get a trainer in.
Your horse does seem to have a hind end issue going on, he looks very uneven.

OneMoreTime
Jul. 5, 2009, 05:26 PM
That was a dirty over-reacton on his part. He definitely looks "off" behind. My first reaction was "stifle", but it's impossible to tell from just the video. Please have your vet see him. He is very cute & I hope the fall didn't hurt too much - either physically or to your confidence.

Good luck & keep us updated!

magnolia73
Jul. 5, 2009, 05:59 PM
I think you need to have a trainer help you.

6 seconds of footage doesn't tell you much- you could have been dumped due to a horse fly. But nothing in that video looked positive or correct. You need to lead in a correct, positive manner and be right *yourself* the first time on a green horse.


However, it looks like you got nervous and went into 2-point three strides out which would have been fine considering your greenness over fences

I agree- but on a green horse who needs a consistent ride to the base, you can't do that. LOL, I used to do that- trainer got on me. You need to communicate to the horse that you want them to stay steady and consistent, not hey- ummm- well- there goes my seat, and I'm gonna drop the connection- deal with it...

pixie
Jul. 5, 2009, 06:18 PM
IMHO your horse is not very suitable with his jumping style to teach someone how to jump. That's a very big back cracking effort over that little cavaletti. Yes, you did let your leg slip back and get him in the flank.....but I'm not sure too many riders that are not considered advance would fare well with that horse's jumping technique.
If you really want to jump do yourself a favor and get a new horse. Even with training his style is not gonna change signifigantly and he clearly doesn't have the right attitude to forgive mistakes which you will make plenty of.

shalomypony
Jul. 5, 2009, 06:31 PM
He's not sound,but that was dirty....no excuse!

Mudder
Jul. 5, 2009, 07:02 PM
donkeyman, yes he is a Saddlebred. And he turned 17 in April. His previous owner sent me pictures of her jumping him, so the thought that he was 'green' over jumps would have never occured to me. I've had no trouble at all with him on the flat... nothing that would have made me think this would happen. Unfortunately, I don't have video of him going the other direction.

As far as I go... I am just starting jumping in lessons on school horses. 6 months ago I started riding again after 6 years off. I'm definitely not at a point where I could correct him over fences.

So, from here, I'll keep riding school horses over fences and get a vet out to check my boy.

cute_lil_fancy_pants_pony
Jul. 5, 2009, 07:17 PM
donkeyman, yes he is a Saddlebred. And he turned 17 in April. His previous owner sent me pictures of her jumping him, so the thought that he was 'green' over jumps would have never occured to me. I've had no trouble at all with him on the flat... nothing that would have made me think this would happen. Unfortunately, I don't have video of him going the other direction.

As far as I go... I am just starting jumping in lessons on school horses. 6 months ago I started riding again after 6 years off. I'm definitely not at a point where I could correct him over fences.

So, from here, I'll keep riding school horses over fences and get a vet out to check my boy.

If you love your horse, keep him, love him and keep riding and training him! All great riders I know learned on less than perfect horses growing up. Not on perfect little packer schoolmasters. You'll be way ahead of the game if you have grit, stick it out, have patience, love your horse, be humble, read lots and seek out lots of knowledge. We are way too freaked out about safety nowadays. Doing crazy stuff on crazy horses while you are young is what teaches you quick reactions, courage, bravery and toughness.

kookicat
Jul. 5, 2009, 07:36 PM
That was a dirty over-reacton on his part. He definitely looks "off" behind. My first reaction was "stifle", but it's impossible to tell from just the video. Please have your vet see him. He is very cute & I hope the fall didn't hurt too much - either physically or to your confidence.

Good luck & keep us updated!

I thought hocks rather than stifle. (But, I'd be a millionaire if I could dignose lameness from one short vid. :winkgrin: )

bornfreenowexpensive
Jul. 5, 2009, 07:51 PM
I guess I don't see it as very dirty on the horse's part. OP got jumped loose. Horse looks fairly sensitive (little buck of annoyance at rider getting in his way and then spin when the rider started falling off--maybe pulling him around)..not really green. A little too much horse for the OP to learn how to jump on. It didn't look like the horse was trying to dump the OP...just reacting to the off balanced rider. A lot of sensitive horses will not tollerate that....none of mine would. It isn't the ideal kind of horse to learn on at first but not dirty or bad in anyway....just not generous or forgiving of green rider mistakes.

I'd not jump on your own for a little while....and add a neck strap when you do jump (keep your hands in it) to help give you a bit more stability.

And get a vet out....he does look off in the right hind...but I don't think that is what caused the issue. Just check it out and make sure it isn't something serious.

mvp
Jul. 5, 2009, 07:52 PM
Yes, you had a part in it. I see one that no one has mentioned: You hit him in the back over the top of the fence. That surprised him, maybe hurt a bit and once he was on the ground, he bucked at the annoyance. I can't account for the spin afterwards except of lack of generosity or experience on his part.

Switching from dressage to hunters presents one problem. You probably would not have hit is back if your lower leg were more secure and you hadn't gotten ahead of him. But part of learning to ride in a two point is the extra degree of body control, core strength and habit of staying up off the horse's back over a fence.

Things happen fast over fences. You were set up to make this kind of mistake by the time you turned the corner and didn't have a secure leg plus the mentally slow, "waiting" ride to the fence that helps a green horse.

No problem. You will get there. But know that you can fix just about every problem over fences with work on the flat and over a single pole. The next time I jumped, I'd start by working on my position over poles until I felt that I could stay off my horse's back when he/we choose any distance. And always wait for the quiet one.

WW_Queen
Jul. 5, 2009, 08:01 PM
You held him too tightly while over the fence. Sure he leaped but apparently didn't think much of your technique, and told you exactly how he felt about it.

My horse is the same way. If you hold his face over a fence the first thing he does when he touches down is tell me to f*ck off. :lol:

cnvh
Jul. 5, 2009, 08:11 PM
My horse is green O/F (he's 6, just started jumping him last December or so), and occasionally he gets crab-hoppy after fences. It's tough to stick, but I've been able to ride through it-- until this past week, when he did it and I went flying right into the arena wall. :eek:

The puzzling thing is, 90% of the time he lands and canters off like an angel, and this is a horse with no "dirty tricks" in him whatsoever-- so I knew it was me causing it, I just didn't know WHAT I was doing.

My fall finally gave me the light-bulb moment... occasionally when he jumps big-- like your guy did in the video-- my lower leg slips back and I goose him with my heels in order to not lose my lower leg completely. Which is exactly what happened when I fell off, nailing him with my heels while in midair. Who could blame him for getting pissed?? :o

So it looks to me like that's at least part of what heppened in your video... I agree that he looks a little off, but I bet those heels of yours had a lot to do with it. :winkgrin:

SillyHorse
Jul. 5, 2009, 08:27 PM
Yes, you had a part in it. I see one that no one has mentioned: You hit him in the back over the top of the fence. That surprised him, maybe hurt a bit and once he was on the ground, he bucked at the annoyance. I can't account for the spin afterwards except of lack of generosity or experience on his part.
Unfortunately, you hit him in the back with your butt, and in the mouth with your hands. I think both "hits" were due to both of you being green and unsteady over the jump.

Good for you for taking lessons on schoolies. What I have discovered after years of dressage (draped, soft leg and yielding back) is that it takes some time to build up the strength in your legs and back that's required for jumping.

Fifteen laps in two point every day for you, missy! :yes: ;)

Equine Adhesive
Jul. 5, 2009, 09:19 PM
Mudder you sound like you are doing the right thing, getting the vet out, not jumping him and instead jumping on schoolies. I hope this thread is helpful and dies a peaceful death, lol. You have your answer(s)! You are brave to start jumping again, and don't give up!!!

BarbB
Jul. 5, 2009, 09:25 PM
I guess I don't see it as very dirty on the horse's part. OP got jumped loose. Horse looks fairly sensitive (little buck of annoyance at rider getting in his way and then spin when the rider started falling off--maybe pulling him around)..not really green. A little too much horse for the OP to learn how to jump on. It didn't look like the horse was trying to dump the OP...just reacting to the off balanced rider. A lot of sensitive horses will not tollerate that....none of mine would. It isn't the ideal kind of horse to learn on at first but not dirty or bad in anyway....just not generous or forgiving of green rider mistakes.

I'd not jump on your own for a little while....and add a neck strap when you do jump (keep your hands in it) to help give you a bit more stability.

And get a vet out....he does look off in the right hind...but I don't think that is what caused the issue. Just check it out and make sure it isn't something serious.

I agree, I didn't see it as dirty, just reacting to the rider. But not a forgiving horse to learn on.

Huntrs+eq
Jul. 5, 2009, 09:58 PM
Well, before we put this baby to sleep, I thought I'd add my two cents--

Agree with mvp about hitting his back and mouth, punishment for the horse who is putting forth quite an effort. One factor may be getting comfortable with a shorter stirrup which will help you stay with the horse's motion and keep from hitting his back in the air.

Also, are you a visual learner? I am, and videos help me a ton. Try a search on youtube and watch hunter, jumper, and equitation rounds to get a more solid idea of what to aim for. (Mind you not all of these are textbook examples...)

Which leads me to--> There is a lot of literature on jumping. Try the classics like George Morris's "Hunter Seat Equitation" and Anna Jane White-Mullen's "Judging Hunters and Hunt Seat Equitation." I'm pretty sure there's another thread on here with a bunch of helpful titles.

equest
Jul. 5, 2009, 10:06 PM
Mudder you sound like you are doing the right thing, getting the vet out, not jumping him and instead jumping on schoolies. I hope this thread is helpful and dies a peaceful death, lol. You have your answer(s)! You are brave to start jumping again, and don't give up!!!

And also brave to post the thread in the first place. All of us have had some rough moments and it takes a lot to admit it, much less post a video. I really like Mudder's response - sounds like she is on the right path. Good luck!!

mbhorse
Jul. 5, 2009, 10:13 PM
donkeyman, yes he is a Saddlebred.

Here's my 2 cents that could be totally off base. When I first saw the videos (before I read any posts mentioning Saddlebred), I didn't think it was a lameness issue, but rather a gaited horse that was on the verge of moving into one of its gaits (rack maybe??).

meupatdoes
Jul. 6, 2009, 10:05 AM
Basically, I think the horse needs an overall softer, more forward, more fluid ride. The overall picture on the flat looks a bit "constipated," try to work on getting everything softer and more flowing on the flat first.

I am not sure if it is a lameness issue or just not riding the horse through and forward enough.

As for the little move after the jump, come on guys.
That was not "dirty" or whatever, it is just what horses sometimes do after a jump. Ideally, the rider will be balanced and quick enough to softly but immediately nip it in the bud with some opening right (in this case) rein before he even makes it five degrees around in that spin, some leg to send him forward, and away we go softly again, no biggie.
Sometimes horses let fly with a buck after a jump or wrangle their heads a little or play, and guess what.... they're HORSES.
Don't take it personally and start calling them "dirty." Smile, put some glue on your pants, and carry on bearing no grudges.
We should spend more emphasis on learning how to ride than on making sure our horses are robots who never challenge us or express an opinion.

OP, I think you could do fine with this horse if a pro would come and be a set of eyes on the ground for you, and maybe to school the horse for you before you get on -less because I don't think you can ride him but more because I think if you see him get it with someone else you'll be more confident that he'll be fine in his own attempts.

I am pleased to see that you have not been calling him "dirty" and are instead focusing on working it out from your end.

pday09
Jul. 6, 2009, 10:26 AM
My problem isn't with the horse, who does look a little off, but with the rider. Your lower leg and base of support in your ankles needs to be a lot more secure and consistent so that a little misbehavior like that doesn't get you off. I would venture to say that your biggest problem is that you tipped far forward into two point over this tiny jump (really does not require you to throw yourself that far forward) and then never recovered. Its a combination of things, I'd say with a green horse like this you need to do more work under the watchful eye of a good trainer, so that you and he make more positive steps towards your goals and have fewer accidents.

joiedevie99
Jul. 6, 2009, 10:40 AM
Glad everything is sorted out. Enjoy your lessons on schoolies, and do let us know how your boy makes out with the vet. Good luck!

Jealoushe
Jul. 6, 2009, 10:47 AM
when you get back at the jumping, definitly shorten those stirrups!!

Ya it was a dirty move but if you are jumping you should be able to stay on through that.

Jsalem
Jul. 6, 2009, 10:51 AM
Lame or no- that was just a dirty trick. He does appear to have a flat tire behind. I would have him examined to see what kind of work he is sound enough to do. If he is sound enough to train on o/f, he needs to have a trainer on his back to get him going so that he's safe enough for you to learn on. That kind of rude behavior is almost impossible for a novice to correct.