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View Full Version : Please critique this video!



short_stack
Jul. 3, 2009, 04:29 PM
I haven't ridden in about six years (took time off in college and grad school) and now, at 24, I am getting back in to the swing of things. I have been riding for about two months and I am currently leasing the quarter horse mare shown in the video. She is 14 years old , used to be a western trail horse, and began jumping a year ago. She is currently owned by a 14 year old girl who likes to get up and go so she is a challenge for me because I am trying to break her bad habits (not bending, pulling, rushing fences, etc.). Thanks for your constructive criticism :)

Its a very short video, just one jump!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gt4Xi5aQSuk

jumperlover101
Jul. 3, 2009, 04:38 PM
try not leaning forward as much. It usually tells horses "GO!" and to not slow down and relax.

I wouldn't have believed that you took 6 years off if you hadn't said it, so props for that!

kateh
Jul. 3, 2009, 06:14 PM
I feel your pain! I'm also riding an ex-Western QH mare that was most recently leased by a 13 year old.

Agree with the lean back, also pick your eyes up around the turn and keep her straight. I think your stirrups could go up a hole, but it was hard to tell from the lighting.

equest
Jul. 3, 2009, 10:28 PM
I agree that stirrups should go up at least one hole. You look really good to my intermediate-level eye. My biggest comment (and this is largely based on my own experience/weakness) is that your leg is coming forward and needs to be strengthened. This is a challenge to most riders, and it is always tough to come back to riding and reestablish these muscles.
Work on it by posting trot without stirrups, and two-point several times around the ring at the trot during each hack. If you are riding often and practicing this consistently, your leg will improve.

Czar
Jul. 4, 2009, 08:56 AM
Definitely stirrups up a hole.

You anticipated the jump in this video which will encourage the mare to want to rush the jump. Two strides out, you got a little busy with your seat and then went into your 2 point too early and too exaggerated for such a small jump causing your mare to leave too early as well.

Over an "X" and especially with a horse that tends to rush, you barely need to give a release - staying more controlled in your hip angle will encourage a horse to wait and jump up as opposed to rushing and jumping flat.

For a horse that tends to get rushy, I always use ground poles. A take off and landing rail at 7ft on each side of a trot jump can do wonders.

short_stack
Jul. 4, 2009, 04:52 PM
Definitely stirrups up a hole.

You anticipated the jump in this video which will encourage the mare to want to rush the jump. Two strides out, you got a little busy with your seat and then went into your 2 point too early and too exaggerated for such a small jump causing your mare to leave too early as well.

Over an "X" and especially with a horse that tends to rush, you barely need to give a release - staying more controlled in your hip angle will encourage a horse to wait and jump up as opposed to rushing and jumping flat.

For a horse that tends to get rushy, I always use ground poles. A take off and landing rail at 7ft on each side of a trot jump can do wonders.

While I do realize that I am exaggerating my two point, the horse doesn't lift her legs if I don't get my butt up and out of the saddle. Any suggestions how to fix this/do it differently?

Carol Ames
Jul. 4, 2009, 05:12 PM
Your release and upper body are very quick, this could be result of stirrups too long:yes: It's too dark to tell much ,more what did you have in mind? There is an old Zen saying, When you go slowly slow , you get fast:confused:, when you go quickly fast, you get slow!

Carol Ames
Jul. 4, 2009, 05:46 PM
Try walking a fence; have someone on the ground to set fences:yes: for you; Walk up to it on loose rein; Sit ABSOLUTELY still until the horse is so close, there is no way to do anything other than "hop over it:yes:! have A person on the ground raise the fence gradually until you've reached her:eek: limit; You can do the same with trotting a fence, then add a second fence you can lope down to and just "step :yes::cool:over" from a canter/ lope

Czar
Jul. 5, 2009, 05:59 PM
While I do realize that I am exaggerating my two point, the horse doesn't lift her legs if I don't get my butt up and out of the saddle. Any suggestions how to fix this/do it differently?

I'm not really sure what you mean? Will she clobber through the jump or just not jump well?

short_stack
Jul. 5, 2009, 10:47 PM
I'm not really sure what you mean? Will she clobber through the jump or just not jump well?

She will run through the jump according to her owner. I haven't experienced this, but my trainer did tell me that she drags her feet. I encountered this once while I was jumping her over a "brick wall" type vertical. She hit the jump with both her front AND back feet!

short_stack
Jul. 5, 2009, 10:49 PM
Try walking a fence; have someone on the ground to set fences:yes: for you; Walk up to it on loose rein; Sit ABSOLUTELY still until the horse is so close, there is no way to do anything other than "hop over it:yes:! have A person on the ground raise the fence gradually until you've reached her:eek: limit; You can do the same with trotting a fence, then add a second fence you can lope down to and just "step :yes::cool:over" from a canter/ lope

I tried walking and trotting ground poles today and after a few times around she was trotting them like second nature. I plan to ask my trainer to lay ground poles during my next lesson so that she doesn't rush/take a long spot while we jump. Thank you!