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View Full Version : Weak heels on a horse



EquineRider
Jun. 30, 2009, 08:56 PM
Hey guys,
Because I'll be training the horse to do hunter/jumper, I thought I'd post it here. What are the flaws in "weak" heels or heel bulbs being too close to the ground? Will I have to watch out for problems down the road?

JB
Jun. 30, 2009, 10:34 PM
Without anything else to go by, *most* likely you are talking about "low" heels from poor trimming.

EquineRider
Jun. 30, 2009, 11:02 PM
Hm, you're probably right. Haha now I feel silly. So are you saying that just letting the hooves grow back out and having them trimmed properly will work?

Pirateer
Jul. 1, 2009, 03:54 AM
Because its been a super long day and my eyes are tired, I definitely read the title as "Wearing Heels On Course"- and thought it was going to be some rant about a HP wearing her Louboutin's during the coursewalk....and thinking that it might be fun to try.

Hello, naptime.

back to your regularly scheduled programming :)

JB
Jul. 1, 2009, 03:57 PM
Hm, you're probably right. Haha now I feel silly.
Nah, don't feel silly - hoof conformation tends to be a very weak point with most people ;)


So are you saying that just letting the hooves grow back out and having them trimmed properly will work?
Well, it's not that simple. "Low heels" generally mean they need frequent trimming to "teach" them to grow more down instead of more forward. "Low" heels are often caused directly by causing/allowing the toes to grow too long. By not addressing toes - preferably often, meaning barefoot and frequent trims, but a good farrier can get the job done with shoes - you can not adequately address the heel issues.

EquineRider
Jul. 1, 2009, 04:06 PM
Nah, don't feel silly - hoof conformation tends to be a very weak point with most people ;)


Well, it's not that simple. "Low heels" generally mean they need frequent trimming to "teach" them to grow more down instead of more forward. "Low" heels are often caused directly by causing/allowing the toes to grow too long. By not addressing toes - preferably often, meaning barefoot and frequent trims, but a good farrier can get the job done with shoes - you can not adequately address the heel issues.


Yeah, the pictures that were sent to me also show a long toe. He is barefoot and I plan to keep him that way. Thank you for your helpful advice and information. :)