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Treasmare2
Jun. 26, 2009, 01:57 PM
Do you cork your hunters for the show season? We seem to have a few more shows offering classics on grass and an upcoming hunter derby (new to this area) so corking becomes a consideration. Is it best to drill the holes and plug them or best to keep in a small road cork? Most of our hunter shows are in sand rings.

Pirateer
Jun. 26, 2009, 01:58 PM
I prefer my hunters go in sober ;)

luvs2ridewbs
Jun. 26, 2009, 02:10 PM
I drill and plug if I know that I will need road studs for grass. But if they are only showing on sand, you probabaly don't need them.

Richmond
Jun. 26, 2009, 02:42 PM
Caulks?

SidesaddleRider
Jun. 26, 2009, 03:06 PM
I think you mean caulks or studs, not corks (those go in wine bottles).

If you really feel that the grass situation will warrant their use, then go ahead and drill/tap your shoes. But remember you can't do that on aluminums, just steel, so debate which you prefer to use. If you do drill, do NOT do a drive-in stud unless your horse is outside most of the time (and drive-ins are not road studs). Road studs should never be left in beyond when you need them (imagine wearing high heels ALL the time). Studs should only be put in when you need them, and adjusted for the footing conditions.

Be sure to ride your horse on grass in them before the show/class, so they get used to them.

TheJenners
Jun. 26, 2009, 03:57 PM
I prefer my hunters go in sober ;)
<snicker snicker snicker>

besttwtbever
Jun. 26, 2009, 04:40 PM
I think you mean caulks or studs, not corks (those go in wine bottles).

If you really feel that the grass situation will warrant their use, then go ahead and drill/tap your shoes. But remember you can't do that on aluminums, just steel, so debate which you prefer to use. If you do drill, do NOT do a drive-in stud unless your horse is outside most of the time (and drive-ins are not road studs). Road studs should never be left in beyond when you need them (imagine wearing high heels ALL the time). Studs should only be put in when you need them, and adjusted for the footing conditions.

Be sure to ride your horse on grass in them before the show/class, so they get used to them.

AGREED

Studs of any type should not be left in. You can use cotton or the foam inserts that they sell at tack stores to keep the holes from getting dirty. Don't forget to clean them out every day if you do this. I have heard using cotton balls soaked with WD-40 works really well to keep the holes clean and makes it easier for the studs to go in when you take the cotton out.

Gry2Yng
Jun. 26, 2009, 04:45 PM
Eventers have all kinds of tricks for keeping the threads on drilled shoes clean. Trying searching over there. The cotton/wd40 works, but it is very hard to remove. Bit of Britain sells lots of products specifically for packing stud holes. WHICH, thanks for the reminder, I got a new set of shoes today and did not pack the holes. DAMN! Would not have had time anyway. maybe I will remember tomorrow.

Go Fish
Jun. 26, 2009, 05:22 PM
But remember you can't do that on aluminums, just steel, so debate which you prefer to use.

My horses are wearing drilled aluminums right now. I don't know if they come that way or my shoer drills them but I've used them for years.

ddashaq
Jun. 26, 2009, 09:13 PM
Thank goodness no one else had ever heard studs referred to as corks. I thought that I was the lone big dummy eventer that was clueless about the correct hunter terminology.

Agree that they should not be left in, there are all types of inserts that work quite well at keeping them clear.

Treasmare2
Jun. 26, 2009, 09:14 PM
Hahhahaahaha....yes caulks not corked....however I find that as I age that for me corked may be a good thing!!!! :yes:

Trak_Eventer
Jun. 26, 2009, 10:35 PM
cotton plugs work great. just have an extra horseshoe nail to dig it out with. Personally, I like the rubber plugs the best.

http://www.bitofbritain.com/Easiest_Plug_Yet_p/0361.htm

asterix
Jun. 26, 2009, 11:27 PM
Use the rubber plugs, very easy to take in and out. Do not have to clean them every day, gosh, I'd go nuts if I did that. Just have 3-in-1 oil or wd-40 handy when you pry the plugs out (with horseshoe nail), clean hole with T tap, spray oil in, insert stud, hand tighten, then wrench tighten until snug (but not so snug the shoe starts coming away from the foot!!!).

DO NOT trailer with them in, ride on roads with them in, etc. Use only when needed, and boot up the horse if possible when wearing studs.
Use the smallest ones you can get away with, bigger always on outside if you use two sizes.

We eventers often put studs in at the trailer parked on deep grass -- for this the metal dish is INDISPENSABLE -- otherwise we'd lose at least a stud per show. I don't tend to stable for events but perhaps in this situation it is less critical.

tarheelmd07
Jun. 27, 2009, 02:03 AM
My horses are wearing drilled aluminums right now. I don't know if they come that way or my shoer drills them but I've used them for years.

One of my boys is in tapped aluminum shoes up front...and we have no problem doing aluminum shoes + studs. As we mostly event and do jumpers, he's wearing studs at shows more often than not...

Seal Harbor
Jun. 27, 2009, 02:31 AM
My hunter was drilled and tapped last year in aluminums. That said we stuff the holes with Never Dull wadding, that stuff that is impregnated with metal polish. Seems to work well and is relatively inexpensive.

Patch
Jun. 27, 2009, 06:26 AM
Thank goodness no one else had ever heard studs referred to as corks. I thought that I was the lone big dummy eventer that was clueless about the correct hunter terminology.

Agree that they should not be left in, there are all types of inserts that work quite well at keeping them clear.


Maybe I'm the lone dummy, but I just had a convo last night with my daughter about "corking" shoes. She works at a hunter/jumper show barn. We are Canadian though so that could explain the difference in terminology, eh? :) Maybe its a regional term?

Romany
Jun. 27, 2009, 09:47 AM
Use the rubber plugs, very easy to take in and out. Do not have to clean them every day, gosh, I'd go nuts if I did that. Just have 3-in-1 oil or wd-40 handy when you pry the plugs out (with horseshoe nail), clean hole with T tap, spray oil in, insert stud, hand tighten, then wrench tighten until snug (but not so snug the shoe starts coming away from the foot!!!).

DO NOT trailer with them in, ride on roads with them in, etc. Use only when needed, and boot up the horse if possible when wearing studs.
Use the smallest ones you can get away with, bigger always on outside if you use two sizes.

We eventers often put studs in at the trailer parked on deep grass -- for this the metal dish is INDISPENSABLE -- otherwise we'd lose at least a stud per show. I don't tend to stable for events but perhaps in this situation it is less critical.


And...if you always store the studs loose with some powerful magnets, they become slightly magnetic themselves, so when you drop them in the general direction of the metal dish (which can also be magnetized), they do tend to "home in" on it, which can make life easier...they'll also hopefully stick slightly to the wrench, which can be a lifesaver.

Leez
Jun. 27, 2009, 10:04 AM
Maybe I'm the lone dummy, but I just had a convo last night with my daughter about "corking" shoes. She works at a hunter/jumper show barn. We are Canadian though so that could explain the difference in terminology, eh? :) Maybe its a regional term?

I call them corks too, and so does everyone I know! Maybe it IS a Canadian thing!

In contrast to the other posters - my hunter wears small roads all the time. I have worked with several BNTs and they also left roads in. In fact, many people call them "keepers" because they "keep" the hole clean.

When I show on grass, I'll change to a small mushroom on the inside branch of the shoe, and a matching height grass point on the outside. For greasy sand footing I might use small mushrooms all around. There are many options for every footing condition - this is part science part art!

justblu
Jun. 27, 2009, 11:37 AM
A couple of extra tips regarding studs that I hadn't seen mentioned yet:

Always buy extra studs (I usually get 10 each of whatever road stud/all around type, but you can just get 5 each of big grass spikes or bullets for mud that will only ever be used on the hind shoes) or at least one will disappear into the shavings 20 min. before your class.

Never use the metal screw in blanks, I've seen them rust into the shoe and we had to pull the horses shoes off to get them out. Def. not worth it. My favorite plugs are the rubber ones with a hole in the middle so you can pull them out with a horseshoe nail.

If you have a horse that could be goofy, get the Safe-T-spin tap or whatever its called. It has very short threads in it and wont break off in the shoe if they snatch their foot away and stand on it.

Seal Harbor
Jun. 27, 2009, 11:43 AM
Look them up on any saddlery site and studs is the keyword, not caulks, or corks. Cork comes from a tree, or is a city/county in Ireland. Caulk(to me) is the stuff that comes in the tube to seal the bathtub or doors and windows.

Stud is the proper term. Beval's even sells Canadian studs! They also offer a book called The Stud Book. Not to be confused with a breeding farm that has stallions in residence.

Hony
Jun. 27, 2009, 11:45 AM
Thank goodness no one else had ever heard studs referred to as corks. I thought that I was the lone big dummy eventer that was clueless about the correct hunter terminology.



I have always refered to them as corks or studs. I think it probably depends on the area you're from. It seems to me that a few people refer to them as such so we can't all be wrong!
The type of stud you use will vary pretty dramatically from area to area, depending on what's under the grass. Best to have a large collection and ask the locals.

MintHillFarm
Jun. 27, 2009, 11:53 AM
Do you cork your hunters for the show season? We seem to have a few more shows offering classics on grass and an upcoming hunter derby (new to this area) so corking becomes a consideration. Is it best to drill the holes and plug them or best to keep in a small road cork? Most of our hunter shows are in sand rings.


Thanks for a good chuckle...caulks, I got it now...

CdnJumper
Jun. 27, 2009, 05:05 PM
Here in western Canada we call them corks as well.... though if you said to me Caulks or Studs I would know what you're talking about...

Treasmare2
Jun. 27, 2009, 06:24 PM
I am happy that I am not the only "cork" person....its must be a Canadian variation. :lol:

Tucked_Away
Jun. 27, 2009, 07:17 PM
Never use the metal screw in blanks, I've seen them rust into the shoe and we had to pull the horses shoes off to get them out. Def. not worth it.

Eventer here...I agree that the blanks are too much trouble to use long-term, but I really like them just overnight the day before I'm going to put a stud in the shoe. Clean, tap, WD-40, and insert blank the night before. Then, day of, all you have to do is unscrew the blank and screw in the stud. Very quick, very easy, very nice.