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ChiliPepper09
Jun. 25, 2009, 08:57 PM
My daughter is beginning to look for colleges (she is a junior in HS) and wants to continue riding in college. She is doing 1.30 jumpers and all the big eq and wants to take her horse with her. She is looking for a college with a very nice equestrian facility and is less concerned about location. So my question is what colleges have the nicest equestrian facilities?

amberella
Jun. 25, 2009, 09:22 PM
University of Findlay has pretty nice facilities, limited turn out but of the places I've visited theirs are the nicest.

gusbabe
Jun. 25, 2009, 09:30 PM
If she isn't planning on an equestrian major, Franklin and Marshall College has an equestrian team. They ride at Windy Mansion Equestrian Center under Jere Frankhouser. The facilities, care and training is top notch. They also attend most of the big shows. Some of the girls on the team choose to stay over the summer to train and show with him. The college gives a quality education.

hj0519
Jun. 25, 2009, 09:32 PM
Not really the advice you're looking for, but....don't pick what schools your daughter is going to apply to based on their riding facilities. Pick the school for the school and choose the riding after, whether it's on a nice facility on campus or a nice facility that you've found off campus.

My main criteria when I was picking colleges was that it had a riding team...I missed out on a lot of good schools because of that and I'm really regretting my choices now, if I'd known when I was applying what I had known now, I would have had a lot more criteria ahead of riding, because the riding can happen wherever you go.

But, that said...like the above poster said, University of Findlay...I'd also add Mount Holyoke, Sweet Briar, I showed once at Lake Erie College and it was really nice there, a friend of mine goes to Albion College and says the facilities there are really nice...

dghunter
Jun. 25, 2009, 09:36 PM
LEC is nice but a pain to show at in the winter. I refuse to now, warm up is just way too small. Regular indoor is very nice though.

From what I understand from my trainer and best friend, college riding teams are very different than doing the regular hunters. Best friend HATED it. Switched to just leasing a horse and doing regular hunter shows.

But ditto to picking a school based on academics and location, not just the riding (unless she's going to be an equine major).

joiedevie99
Jun. 25, 2009, 09:37 PM
The school's barn only matters if she wants to ride for a team. If not, you need a school that allows freshman to bring cars, and is within a half hour of a decent barn. As far as nicest school barns, Mount Holyoke's is beautiful.

RoyalTRider
Jun. 25, 2009, 09:41 PM
Unsolicited advice, but I second with a thumbs up what HJ said a couple posts above. I made the same mistake. I adapt easily to situations so I thought I could just make the best of any situation and that would be enough. I was wrong. I made the best out of it. It wasn't enough.

Please tell her to consider a lot of other criteria. Encourage her to consider what would happen if she could not ride. If the school would not still be enough, it is not the right school. In the first couple of weeks of my first yea second semester, when I was supposed to be really getting into the riding season, I badly injured both legs. Both of the injuries separately were enough to make me not able to walk for about two weeks, nevertheless when they were combined. These things really can happen.

Again, unsolicited advice. But after my experience I feel I should share it.

norcalammie
Jun. 25, 2009, 09:41 PM
I agree pick the school based on the academics and then find a place for her to ride. What major is she considering as you might get different answers? Also what part of the country are you/she considering?

JinxyPoo
Jun. 25, 2009, 09:43 PM
Not really the advice you're looking for, but....don't pick what schools your daughter is going to apply to based on their riding facilities. Pick the school for the school and choose the riding after, whether it's on a nice facility on campus or a nice facility that you've found off campus.

My main criteria when I was picking colleges was that it had a riding team...I missed out on a lot of good schools because of that and I'm really regretting my choices now, if I'd known when I was applying what I had known now, I would have had a lot more criteria ahead of riding, because the riding can happen wherever you go.

But, that said...like the above poster said, University of Findlay...I'd also add Mount Holyoke, Sweet Briar, I showed once at Lake Erie College and it was really nice there, a friend of mine goes to Albion College and says the facilities there are really nice...

I agree with this 1000%. She can always find a barn close to campus to keep her horse. Your daughter sounds like a very accomplished rider but I've known several girls who have gone to the very horsey schools, Centenary, Lake Erie, etc., with the intention of riding on the IHSA team, and trying out for the team and not making it. Again I don't know your daughter's abilities but those teams are VERY selective. They are also a huge time commitment and she would probably have little time to devote to her own horse.

Heineken
Jun. 25, 2009, 09:46 PM
The OP needs to clarify whether her daughter wants to ride for a team or whether she wants to ride her own horse near school. There is a HUGE difference. A good, quality hunter/jumper barn can be found almost everywhere, find a school and the barn will come. If she wants to ride on a team it's a totally different situation.

superpony123
Jun. 25, 2009, 10:38 PM
Not really the advice you're looking for, but....don't pick what schools your daughter is going to apply to based on their riding facilities. Pick the school for the school and choose the riding after, whether it's on a nice facility on campus or a nice facility that you've found off campus.

My main criteria when I was picking colleges was that it had a riding team...I missed out on a lot of good schools because of that and I'm really regretting my choices now, if I'd known when I was applying what I had known now, I would have had a lot more criteria ahead of riding, because the riding can happen wherever you go.

But, that said...like the above poster said, University of Findlay...I'd also add Mount Holyoke, Sweet Briar, I showed once at Lake Erie College and it was really nice there, a friend of mine goes to Albion College and says the facilities there are really nice...

ditto! education first, riding second. trust me, OP, find a school and a nice barn will be somewhere (granted, as long as shes not going to somewhere in the middle of nowhere in western land. then it will be tough)

ChiliPepper09
Jun. 25, 2009, 10:56 PM
To clarify she is not picking based on riding and her top 3 schools are not "horsey" schools. She would just like to apply to a few schools that are "horsey" just in case she changes her mind. And as for if she wants to be on a team or not she is open to the possibility and just trying to gather as much information as possible. And thank you all for your stories and suggestions, again she just wants to see all possibilities and keep them all open.

IsolaBella09
Jun. 25, 2009, 11:16 PM
I'm going to Skidmore College in the Fall. They have a great facility, excellent trainers, and are one of the best teams out there. PM me if you have specific questions.
http://www.skidmoreriding.com/

Mount Holyoke was another one of my schools that I had considered applying to. They are also known for their amazing riding program and facilities. Centenary is one of the best teams in the country and they have the instructors, horses, and facilities to boot. University of Georgia, Auburn University, College of Charleston, Texas A&M, and University of South Carolina have some of the best teams in the country as well.

Pat
Jun. 25, 2009, 11:20 PM
She can always try to start a team....

The IHSA founder started this as a college freshman. With help, of course.

What does she want to major in? That would help too.

ChiliPepper09
Jun. 25, 2009, 11:26 PM
She is unsure of her major at the moment but possibly pre-vet/med.

RyGirl
Jun. 25, 2009, 11:40 PM
I have never known anyone who had good luck taking their SHOW horse to school with them. Especially horses used to big show barn lifestyle & care...

hoops04
Jun. 25, 2009, 11:54 PM
I went to St. Andrews Presbyterian College... and loved it. I went for the riding, and while there the facilities got even better! The equitation center is amazing! not to mention the fantastic horses and staff there as well...

and i got me a education too! i highly reccomend it,

and for whatever i spelled wrong, dont blame st. Andrews... i just cant spell!

ChiliPepper09
Jun. 26, 2009, 01:00 AM
*jumper*- She knows not to pick just on riding and the schools she is mainly thinking about dont even have equestrian facilities, but she is just trying to get an idea of the other options available. But thanks for your concerns!

ChiliPepper09
Jun. 26, 2009, 01:06 AM
*jumper*- She knows not to pick just on riding and the schools she is mainly thinking about dont even have equestrian facilities, but she is just trying to get an idea of the other options available. But thanks for your concerns!

twobays
Jun. 26, 2009, 07:27 AM
I have never known anyone who had good luck taking their SHOW horse to school with them. Especially horses used to big show barn lifestyle & care...

I totally disagree. She probably won't be able to heavily campaign the circuit, but if she's smart, hardworking and willing to make sacrifices, she'll certainly be able to keep showing.

RyGirl
Jun. 26, 2009, 07:49 AM
Twobays - my comment had nothing to do with the person being able to show, it had to do with the horse being able to adapt to his new lifestyle.

MikeP
Jun. 26, 2009, 08:01 AM
If she wants to come to the Southeast, both Auburn and Georgia have good vet schools and nationally ranked equestrian teams. Can't go wrong at either of those schools.

Rue Belle
Jun. 26, 2009, 08:09 AM
mt. holyoke (sp?)

centenary in nj was really pretty when they hosted their tournament

skidmore - where i wish i had gone... the town is soo cute

lynn - in florida.... where people go who want to show at WEF and still go to school

dghunter
Jun. 26, 2009, 08:25 AM
From what I understand Ohio State has a pretty good pre-vet and pre-med program. There are some barns in the area. They do have a team but don't know much about it.

Tackpud
Jun. 26, 2009, 08:52 AM
Sweet Briar has one of the best facilities in the country along with top trainers who compete (and judge) at national levels. The barn staff is excellent and the care of the horses is top notch. Yes - a step below a "AA" show stable, but way above the norm for a college facility. Lots of turn out and individual care.

Despite what others might say, it is not just a "finishing" school - you can get a very good education. It's small and you get lots of individual attention from the faculty. I have a student headed there next fall as a pre-vet major. Their acceptance rate into vet school is 100% - that's something to check out if she is interested in pre-vet.

Ponymom4
Jun. 26, 2009, 09:08 AM
One of our boarders is going to Hollins this fall. The school seems great as well as the facilities. My daughter is going to go up when our trainer transports the boarder's horse so she can tour it too.

I've heard great things about Sweetbriar, both from a riding and non-riding standpoint. If I had to pick my first choice for my daughter, that would be it. We have several non-horsey friends who graduated from it and loved it.

A good friend of my daughter's is a graduate of Swannee in Tenn. (not sure I spelled that correct). It also is a great school and our daughter's friend speaks highly of it, both from the equestrian standpoint and the academic.

St. Andrews Pres. is in our state and I really like the facilities there.

My daughter is a rising high school senior who is graduating early in Dec. so she can go to Florida to work in horses til college. Unfortunately, we can't get her to want to go to any college that is more than a close drive from the family farm, so she will probably end up at a non-horsey local one for at the least the first 2 years.

________________
www.chadalefarms.com

besttwtbever
Jun. 26, 2009, 09:26 AM
Here is the link to the IHSA website.

http://www.ihsainc.com/

Here you can find a list of all the schools that compete and maybe find a school from them that she would like. I showed in the IHSA for 3 years and loved it!

If she is thinking Pre-vet Purdue University in Indiana has an excellent Pre-vet/vet program. The nice thing is that since it is a large university with many majors, if she changes her mind there will be lots of other choices for her. The Undergraduate Studies Program is great for those students who aren't sure what they want to do yet. PM me if you want more info.

Purdue does have an equestrian team and multiple barns in the area although no major H/J barns, but they're cheap! ($250-375/month) There are a few nice H/J barns in Indy which is about an hours drive.

On the other hand, if she is thinking pre-med University of Washington has an EXCELLENT medical school. Again another large university with lots of choices if she changes her mind.

There are MANY Hunter/Jumper barns near (30-45 min.) the UW campus as well.

TBDQ0328
Jun. 26, 2009, 10:52 AM
I went to Findlay and was an equestrian major. They have great facilities! Their H/J team is great, though it is different from regular hunters. They do attend outside shows so that is an option too. However, to keep your horse at the university's barn you must be a student in the program and you must be using your horse in the program (as opposed to bein assigned a school horse for the semester/year). Each student is assigned a horse for the semester or year and are required to turn-out/ clean it's stall/take care of it in addition to working with that horse in your lesson every day. The english program is too big to provide boarding for horses that aren't actually being used in the program. The instructors often have students who keep their horses boarded else where haul in on the weekends for lessons. They usually have quite a few students who do bring in their own horses to use.
UF also has a great Pre'Vet program is that is the way she is looking at going. I would contact Sam McCarty (director of the English program) or Dr. Peck (Director of the Pre-vet program) is she wants more info on that school.

KnKShowmom
Jun. 26, 2009, 10:53 AM
Another vote for Sweet Briar - super education, fantastic riding facility and 3,000 acres of absolutely beautiful campus!

The nice thing about the riding program at Sweet Briar is they participate in a variety of organizations - local and rated shows in hunter, jumper and equitation plus IHSA and ANRC. The also have an equine studies program so you get more than just saddle time.

draftXjump
Jun. 26, 2009, 11:58 AM
I also add in another vote for Skidmore. I applied there, got in and loved the school, the location and the great proximity of the barn.

The only reason I did not go was that my parents objected. I got into liberal arts schools that were more highly ranked and my dad had an absolute fit that I still wanted to go to Skidmore.

A piece of advice I have for any parents of soon to be college applicants - let your kid choose and don't go by US News. As a rising senior, I am not unhappy at the college I chose. I'm getting a fabulous education and since I'm going pre-law, the rigor of the academic program is very important to me, however, I do think that if I'd taken a more holistic approach and considered my riding interest more, I might have had an even more positive experience.

mew
Jun. 26, 2009, 12:16 PM
Out in Cali if the grades are there Stanford is a *very* good school they have a lovely on campus barn but many students keep their horses at local A show barns. . . Woodside horse Park is a bike ride as is the Portola Valley training center, Menlo Circus Club and many mores

UC davis could be another option

letmroll
Jun. 26, 2009, 02:37 PM
Out in Cali if the grades are there Stanford is a *very* good school they have a lovely on campus barn but many students keep their horses at local A show barns. . . Woodside horse Park is a bike ride as is the Portola Valley training center, Menlo Circus Club and many mores

UC davis could be another option


Stanford's facilities are BEAUTIFUL (http://www.stanford.edu/group/set/). It's true that there are lots of show barns in the area (although you'd have to be in pretty good shape to bike to the Horse Park - it's up a huge hill :)), but local show trainers also come regularly to teach on campus. I've kept a horse at a show barn in Woodside and at Stanford, so PM me if you have specific questions.

FarnleyGarnet
Jun. 26, 2009, 03:10 PM
I don't think the OP mentioned a specific area of the country... but you can't go wrong in Virginia. You're surrounded by horse country and there's a farm with good facilities near almost every college and university.

Virginia Intermont, Sweet Briar and Hollins have on campus facilities that board student horses. The ammenities and care at these 3 schools rival some top A show barns and there's excellent turn out. UVA rides with The Barracks which is great too. If I chose a college based solely on the care and happiness of my horse I would have picked from those.

On the other hand I can't think of a better school in Virginia than Virginia Tech if your daughter is serious about vet school. The only vet school & teaching hospital in VA & MD is right on campus. VT also has a great sport horse breeding program the undergrad students are involved in. The breeding and riding facilities on campus are for VT's own horses only but there are several places to board nearby. The campus is gorgeous and if she changes her mind she can choose from plenty of other schools and majors at VT. I started out pre-vet but switched out my sophamore year. But I know 15+ friends from my animal & poultry science classes who just graduated from VT's vet school (VMRCVM). Seems like it's easier to get in if you're already at the school for undergrad.

Giddy-up
Jun. 26, 2009, 03:42 PM
However, to keep your horse at the university's barn you must be a student in the program and you must be using your horse in the program (as opposed to bein assigned a school horse for the semester/year). Each student is assigned a horse for the semester or year and are required to turn-out/ clean it's stall/take care of it in addition to working with that horse in your lesson every day.

just curious.....

If you bring your horse, are you assigned to your horse? Or could it be assigned to somebody else in the program?

And if you are doing basically self care--do you still pay board? Or just partial board?

hj0519
Jun. 26, 2009, 03:49 PM
just curious.....

If you bring your horse, are you assigned to your horse? Or could it be assigned to somebody else in the program?

And if you are doing basically self care--do you still pay board? Or just partial board?

I think that you are assigned your own horse - I know someone who goes there and has her horse and I'm pretty sure it isn't assigned to someone else. About boarding costs...you might want to check out this link:
http://www.findlay.edu/academics/colleges/cosc/academicprograms/undergraduate/EQST/eep/incomingfreshman/bringyourhorsetocollege.htm

Renn/aissance
Jun. 26, 2009, 04:46 PM
I have never known anyone who had good luck taking their SHOW horse to school with them. Especially horses used to big show barn lifestyle & care...

I attended Sweet Briar College for the last two years and was happy with the care provided. The training itself is top notch--Shelby French is one of the best trainers I've ever learned from--and I thought well of the overall horse care. Riders and horses came to SBC from some of the biggest show barns in the country. If the rider is used to big show barn services like grooming and tack cleaning being provided, that is an option at SBC for an additional cost.

Since the OP's daughter is looking at pre-vet, she might also be interested to know that 100% of SBC vet school applicants are admitted.

ChiliPepper09
Jun. 26, 2009, 05:35 PM
Sweet Briar and Hollins looks great, but she would rather not go to an all girls school.

upnover192
Jun. 26, 2009, 05:49 PM
Glad to hear that she is keeping her options open and looking into all aspects of her college career. I graduated from Virginia Tech with an animal science/equine emphasis degree and absolutely loved it! Academically it's fantastic and there is a vet school, which the undergrads sometimes utilize. There are enough options so in case she decides horses/vet school are not in her future she can still get a good education. They have several farms as a part of the campus so I took classes in horse behavior and training, horse production (paired with a broodmare and took care of her/foal), etc etc. I don't think the IHSA team is great but they do a lot of the A shows around there as well and there are several hunter/jumper barns in the area. Definitely worth looking into IMHO!

KnKShowmom
Jun. 26, 2009, 05:59 PM
Sweet Briar and Hollins looks great, but she would rather not go to an all girls school.

I never really thought about it when I went to Sweet Briar, but my friends thought I was crazy to go to an all girls school. Honestly, I think it was an advantage which your daughter should consider. She wants to go pre-vet, which is not the easiest road to travel. When she is in school, she can focus on the academics. When she wants to socialize, there are plenty of schools nearby for that.

Its not a convent, but it does have a great sense of communtiy (everyone lives on campus) and I found it nice to be in a classroom with other women and our views/ideas and not to have the feeling that I needed to compete with the men and theirs.

Nski32
Jun. 26, 2009, 06:04 PM
Cornell University
http://www.cornell.edu/
Cazenovia College
http://www.cazenovia.edu/default.aspx?tabid=587

tullio
Jun. 26, 2009, 06:12 PM
Sweet Briar and Hollins looks great, but she would rather not go to an all girls school.


I swore I would not go to an all girls school (especially since I went to an all girls high school), but ended up at Hollins anyway and thank goodness I did. :lol: Loved every minute, the riding was GREAT, and it was easy easy to have a great social life. (I did spend a bit of time on the highway back and forth to VMI :lol: ).

Hollins definitely has brand name recognition in the horse world, which has been great for finding jobs/just opening doors to certain opportunities. It is worth a visit if the riding and academics interest her - the on-campus atmosphere makes the decision for most prospective students.

WindyIsles
Jun. 26, 2009, 06:30 PM
Sweet Briar and Hollins looks great, but she would rather not go to an all girls school.

I go to Hollins (Class of 2011) and believe me I was 'not looking to go to an all women's college' but Hollins is more than just 'a single sex' school. I can't speak highly enough of the academics and professors (small classes and lots of personal attention and Professors who genuinely WANT to get to know their students) and the close-knit feel of the campus. The barn is a 5-10 minute walk from the dorms and just wonderful. The coaches and the quality of horses you get to ride are fantastic.

So please do not cross off Hollins (or Sweet Briar! One of my best friends is a graduate and can't say enough good things) just because they are an all women's college. Both Sweet Briar and Hollins have very high acceptance rates into Veterinary and Medical school as well as a host of other strong programs.

(My Grandmother was horrified for me when she heard I was going to an all women's college. 'HOW are you going to find a man!?' she asked. I think I managed that quite well :winkgrin: managed to snag myself an awesome Boyfriend. So if your daughter is worried that there won't be men around or her social life will be stunted she needn't fear).

Crazy_Eventer
Jun. 26, 2009, 07:07 PM
Current student of Skidmore College here :) I'm pre-vet/Chemistry major, equestrian team member, and took my horse to school with me so also have input as a boarder at the skidmore stables. The team is very competitive, instructors are some of the BEST I've ever had, and the school itself is academically strong :) As a plus, the stables is a 3 minute cab ride (paid for by skidmore) and is HEATED-a HUGE bonus in cold upstate NY lol I had a great first year there and highly recommend it-feel free to PM me with any questions

ChiliPepper09
Jun. 27, 2009, 08:42 PM
Thanks everyone, and i will let her know about all of these schools.

bumknees
Jun. 28, 2009, 06:27 AM
When I went to college in the early 80's I went to Ohio State and at the time if someone wished to get into their vet school it was highly recomended that they attend undergrad there because ( these numbers are probabl off a bit its been a long time) if you go to ohio state and apply for vet school you needed a slightly lower gpa than if you went elsewhere. So lets say an undergrad at ohio state would need a 3.5 vs the 3.9 from another undergrad school. Their thinking was if you went undergrad there they knew what you had taken and what the classes involved etc. So that might be something to concider when choosing the undergrad school.

Also if it were me applying I would seriously look into the rankings of the schools both for undergrad and for vet or med schools and see if in the top 10 or so both show up with close rankings ie university X ranks 10 in undergrad but ranks 6 in vet /med school. then make the decission on what would be bst for my based on that.

slp
Jun. 28, 2009, 12:42 PM
I have never known anyone who had good luck taking their SHOW horse to school with them. Especially horses used to big show barn lifestyle & care...

We did and it worked out just fine, you just have to be at a school where freshmen can have cars (and the kid actually HAS a car) and there is a good show barn nearby. We switched to a new show barn near the school and the quality and standards of care were just about identical to what we were used to.
To the OP...go to the best academic school that you can get accepted to that is a good fit for you (size, location, majors offered, etc.) and then worry about finding a barn. Ask yourself "if I couldn't ride, would I still want to go to school here?". If the answer is yes then you might have found yourself the right one.

tja789
Jun. 28, 2009, 01:33 PM
No offense to people who like Sweet Briar, but from an academic point of view, this is not an especially well respected or highly ranked college. There are dozens of liberal arts colleges and universities that have much higher standards for admittance and offer a more demanding curriculum. I'm sure that the stables are top notch, but as many people have pointed out, this is probably not the best criteria to use when selecting a college.

Tamsin
Jun. 28, 2009, 03:32 PM
St. Lawrence (Canton, NY) has excellent on-campus equestrian facilities (heated barn and indoor arena!) and a competitive IHSA team. The college takes academics seriously and offers a great liberal arts education as well as the opportunity to ride.

Abbeyroad1791
Jun. 28, 2009, 03:59 PM
Mount Holyoke has a great riding team, they end up at Nationals almost every year and their riding facilities are GORGEOUS. Academically, its one of the 7 Sister Schools and a very well respected liberal arts school. Again, its an all girls school though...

JayTee
Jun. 28, 2009, 09:58 PM
I can't say enough good things about the Mt. Holyoke program AND facilities (not to mention the great education). This would be the IHSA route. Please feel free to PM me for more information.