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View Full Version : Aack! My braider CUT my horse's mane! WWYD?



Twentymetercircle
Jun. 25, 2009, 04:44 PM
I was not there when she came to braid my horse. The braids looked great though and I was really pleased with the job she did.

When I took the braids out, I noticed my horse's mane was shorter, but I figured she probably pulled it a bit to even it out. I couldn't tell for a couple of days because the mane was still kinked. There was one section that looked unusually short, and at first I thought maybe I accidently cut it when I took the braids out. (didn't have my seam ripper, had to use small scissors). When the mane did relax, it was very obvious the mane had been cut as it was choppy and uneven. My trainer was horrified and at first thought I had cut the mane. She had a fit because I also do dressage and now the mane is too short for dressage braids. :mad:

I can't get the mane back, but what if anything do I say to the braider? She is not new to braiding and shows at the A level, so I would think she would know better?

Coppers mom
Jun. 25, 2009, 04:51 PM
If your horse is a pain for mane pulling, and his mane was too long, I wouldn't say anything. If it was perfectly fine (by most everyone's standards), then just casually say "I'd appreciate it if you didn't cut Pootsie's mane next time". In the mean time, see if you can pull it to even it out a little bit.

Twentymetercircle
Jun. 25, 2009, 05:09 PM
If your horse is a pain for mane pulling, and his mane was too long, I wouldn't say anything. If it was perfectly fine (by most everyone's standards), then just casually say "I'd appreciate it if you didn't cut Pootsie's mane next time". In the mean time, see if you can pull it to even it out a little bit.

Thanks, good suggestion. The mane had just been pulled a couple of weeks ago and my horse doesn't love having the mane pulled but is not even close to being a PIA about it. No behavior issues that would warrant taking scissors to it.

Jo
Jun. 25, 2009, 05:12 PM
I would call and have a calm discussion with the braider. Since you don't know the story, I don't think you should be getting upset yet.

FrenchFrytheEqHorse
Jun. 25, 2009, 08:10 PM
I would take it as a lesson learned and find a new braider. I've never met a braider that would do this to a mane. If it needed pulling, they'd pull it and charge accordingly. If the horse won't tolerate having its mane pulled, they'd leave it unbraided and say "good luck finding a braider to work with that". Taking the leap to cutting a mane ruins it for a long time, making it nearly impossible for another braider to do their job. That's unprofessional and inappropriate. Find a new braider.

Iride
Jun. 25, 2009, 08:54 PM
In my opinion, the braider should have asked you if she could cut it (with a reason in mind of course), before doing so.

superpony123
Jun. 25, 2009, 09:17 PM
In my opinion, the braider should have asked you if she could cut it (with a reason in mind of course), before doing so.

I agree.

anyway, OP, i think it's time to find a new braider.

MintHillFarm
Jun. 25, 2009, 10:03 PM
At least it will grow back! She should have asked in my opinion, though without knowing the whole set of circumstances (time of night etc) it had to have been a quick decision on her part to get your horse finished up...

Petstorejunkie
Jun. 25, 2009, 10:43 PM
Get a shedding rake for a dog. Like the top one in this picture: http://www.drsfostersmith.com/product/detailed_image.cfm?pCatId=843&large=/images/Categoryimages/larger/lg-21963-41050P-dog.jpg
Let the mane get good and dirty, tanglie and then take the rake and brush it with the rake. Then take a pair of thinning shears and even out the ends so they look uniform.

Seriously, it's an easy fix. I dont even pull my horses mane, i do the above because he has a THICK mane and hates having it pulled. I dont think it's anything to get bent out of shape for... it's hair

Luv2Show
Jun. 25, 2009, 10:54 PM
I know a very talented braider that actually asks customers to NOT pull their manes. It makes little fly aways and she prefers it to just be cut to the appropriate length.

Everyone has their own way. If yours and hers dont match up then certainly find another! I bet if you talked to her and asked she wouldnt do it again.

heres hoping it grows out fast and doesnt cause any trouble!

Rhody Ram
Jun. 25, 2009, 11:12 PM
Sometimes even if you pull the mane it's just TOO long for braiding. The braider is then left with tails sticking out from under the finished braids. Braiders do what they can to cover up the tails but sometimes they may just have to do a little discrete trimming. The best thing to do for a mane is to pull it lightly and then shorten with a clipper blade. (Tease it and then use the clipper blade to trim). Pulling does create a million little flyaways that are impossible to tame, even with quick braid.

mbhorse
Jun. 26, 2009, 01:00 AM
The best thing to do for a mane is to pull it lightly and then shorten with a clipper blade. (Tease it and then use the clipper blade to trim).

Mine is a PITA about mane pulling, so this is how I do his every time. Braiders, do you hate/like this? I tend to use a fairly dull clipper blade and don't cut straight down on the hairs.

ETA: I use an old clipper blade removed from the clippers to do this. Tease up, then use clipper blade held in my hand to trim mane. No actual clippers are involved.

Luv2Show
Jun. 26, 2009, 02:40 AM
... shorten with a clipper blade. (Tease it and then use the clipper blade to trim). Pulling does create a million little flyaways that are impossible to tame, even with quick braid.

Yup..now that you mention it she does use the clippers instead of scissors to shorten the mane. She uses a comb and then clippers from the underside.

Rhody Ram
Jun. 26, 2009, 09:35 AM
Mine is a PITA about mane pulling, so this is how I do his every time. Braiders, do you hate/like this? I tend to use a fairly dull clipper blade and don't cut straight down on the hairs.

ETA: I use an old clipper blade removed from the clippers to do this. Tease up, then use clipper blade held in my hand to trim mane. No actual clippers are involved.

I am a braider and I do that myself, so yes, I love it.

Sometimes customers think they are helping out by pulling the mane but pull unevenly and too thin. Then, it might even still be too long and now too thin as well.

If your braider has time and you know that your horse's mane is a mess, ask her AHEAD OF TIME if she can fix it for you before braiding. Don't try to fix it yourself unless you know you are competent.

Showing up to a barn full of jungle-maned horses when you're on a time limit is not too fun.

Midge
Jun. 26, 2009, 10:05 AM
Holy cow, if I got fired every time I cut a horse's mane, I wouldn't have a job. There is relationship between length and thickness that usually ends up being met by cutting. Pull to the appropriate thick(thin)ness, then cut to the appropriate length.

Most braiders don't want the mane cut straight off, so they don't. However, when you leave me a voicemail about the new baby green you added to the list and he has a ten inch long mane and I am now behind schedule before I even get started, don't be surprised when I whip out the scissors and hack away at it to get it braided that first time. I'll repair the damage the next day.

I am not sure why there would be a problem with dressage braids as I like my manes the same way for both styles.

Hony
Jun. 26, 2009, 10:26 AM
I was not there when she came to braid my horse. The braids looked great though and I was really pleased with the job she did.


I can't get the mane back, but what if anything do I say to the braider? She is not new to braiding and shows at the A level, so I would think she would know better?

Say nothing, wait 'till the mane grows back which won't take long. You can still do buttons with a short mane. I do it often. If you are really unhappy, learn to braid yourself and you'll never have this problem again.

HuntrJumpr
Jun. 26, 2009, 10:37 AM
What would I do? Nothing. Though next time I'd talk to the braider beforehand and see what they need to do their job properly.

I braid my own and when I haven't pulled my manes short enough, I'm stuck with those little tails. Snip snip with the scissors and those are gone. The great thing that always worked out for me is that the mane is then short enough the next time I go to braid. ;) I can straighten it out a bit once I pull the braid out; I'll just go through with a pulling comb and the clippers, which is also my method of attack for those thin manes that need to be shortened (as someone else mentioned).

As for the button braids - no big deal. You can still do sewn-in buttons, you'll just need to put more in. I have friends who do dressage with only 6-8 braids -- you may have to double that number, but it still shouldn't require the millions that go onto a hunter neck.

Rye
Jun. 26, 2009, 11:38 AM
well, if she's an experienced braider that you've used before and not had this problem, my guess is that you didn't give her a horse with the mane ready to braid. Ie, it should have been pulled shorter or thinned. She's got a limited amount of time to get the mane done and move onto the next horse, cutting it might have been faster, who knows.

My point is that you have a piece of this responsibility pie on your plate too.

(and no I am not a braider, don't know how, just been to enough shows to have heard braiders grumbing in the stall when they've been given a hairy mess to braid)

tidy rabbit
Jun. 26, 2009, 11:47 AM
In my opinion, the braider should have asked you if she could cut it (with a reason in mind of course), before doing so.

I don't know about this scenario but more often than not they are braiding all night/ wee hours of the morning and I don't think they stop to call customers at 3am....

I've heard of this happening on more than one occassion and seen the end result, which was pretty ugly.

Once in ST Louis a braider mistakenly braided my jumper and my friend's jumper with hunter braids. She did the wrong horses and I felt really bad for her. Both of these jumpers had pretty wild jumper manes and I was SO glad when we pulled the braids out that neither of them had been hacked.

Maybe leave a note for the braider in the future to "Please pull, don't cut"?

bornfreenowexpensive
Jun. 26, 2009, 12:02 PM
Thanks, good suggestion. The mane had just been pulled a couple of weeks ago and my horse doesn't love having the mane pulled but is not even close to being a PIA about it. No behavior issues that would warrant taking scissors to it.

I know several people that cut the manes for braiding as it makes for cleaner braids supposedly.....don't know if it is true but that is what I've been told. I have two horses whose manes have to be cut not pulled...one because they will kill you (I'm not kidding if you pull) and the other because his mane is very thin. But I can cut a mane so that it looks pulled (actually takes longer than pulling) and looks good. I do know that I have no issues braiding a cut mane unless I want to put in big honking braids (can get away with this in eventing) because I'm short on time....then it is tougher when it is cut ;)


What do you mean dressage braids? Never heard of such a thing...and I've been to and groomed at several top dressage show and seen horses braided in different fashions. All looked good and were acceptable.

I event but have many friends who show FEI levels in dressage....we all sew our braids into button braids....and I've NEVER heard of a mane being too short for such braiding other than one that is perhaps roached.

Giddy-up
Jun. 26, 2009, 12:17 PM
Many braiders will braid down to a certain length & then snip the ends. Otherwise the braids are too long & loopy & don't pull up nice. I've never seen it look all hacked up.

Not sure what you mean by "dressage braids" either--the braiders do the same braids, just add the white tape if the people want it.

And if you wet the mane pre-taking the braids out--it gets rids of the kinks & makes taking braids out easier. :)

Twentymetercircle
Jun. 26, 2009, 05:03 PM
What do you mean dressage braids? Never heard of such a thing...and I've been to and groomed at several top dressage show and seen horses braided in different fashions. All looked good and were acceptable.

I event but have many friends who show FEI levels in dressage....we all sew our braids into button braids....and I've NEVER heard of a mane being too short for such braiding other than one that is perhaps roached.

Dressage braids, button braids = same thing, sorry for the confusion.


Holy cow, if I got fired every time I cut a horse's mane, I wouldn't have a job. There is relationship between length and thickness that usually ends up being met by cutting. Pull to the appropriate thick(thin)ness, then cut to the appropriate length.

I am not sure why there would be a problem with dressage braids as I like my manes the same way for both styles.

I wouldn't mind it being cut I think if it at least looked even. The problem is some spots are shorter than others and some parts have a layered look. I don't think the shorter parts will be able to be braided into the button style.


Get a shedding rake for a dog. Like the top one in this picture: http://www.drsfostersmith.com/product/detailed_image.cfm?pCatId=843&large=/images/Categoryimages/larger/lg-21963-41050P-dog.jpg
Let the mane get good and dirty, tanglie and then take the rake and brush it with the rake. Then take a pair of thinning shears and even out the ends so they look uniform.


Interesting idea, I will check it out, thank you!

I appreciate everyone's comments and suggestions, I guess the bottom line is I would have at least liked to have heard from the braider that she was going to cut, rather than pull the mane. My horse was the only one she was braiding, so it wasn't like she had a lot of horses to braid in a limited time or anything. I will chat with her and see what she has to say. I really like her and would actually like to use her again.

Vandy
Jun. 26, 2009, 08:19 PM
I guess the bottom line is I would have at least liked to have heard from the braider that she was going to cut, rather than pull the mane.And I would be absolutely IRATE if a braider called me at 3am unless my horse was colicking or bleeding profusely or something. If I wanted to be awake at that ungodly hour, I'd be braiding my own horse's mane. If you want to use her again, clearly explain your preferences.