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View Full Version : Looking for inexpensive used wool flocked saddle



SCF01
May. 18, 2009, 08:55 AM
I'd like to find an inexpensive used saddle for one of my horses. I think it should be wool flocked so eventually I can get the fitter to stuff it to fit his back. Right now I'm using the same saddle for two horses with VERY different backs.

This horse is 12 yrs old, been pretty much out of a job for the past year so his topline isn't what it use to be. :no: His withers seem to have shot up too. My current saddle that use to fit him, is very low in the cantle now. There's also only about 2 fingers clearance at the wither. It's a county stabilizer, med tree.

Any suggestions on what brands/models to look for to fit this horse? I plan to have the fitter out sometime in July but I'd like to start looking for something now.

merrygoround
May. 18, 2009, 09:13 AM
Both Trumbull Mountain Saddlery, and Rick's Heritage Saddlery are good sources for used saddles.

alittlegray
May. 18, 2009, 09:21 AM
Any other good used saddle places you can recommend? I'm looking for something specific too and haven't found it yet. I checked both of those places and they don't have one.
TIA!

SCF01
May. 18, 2009, 09:23 AM
I'm really looking for brand & model suggestions. Thanks for the stores though.

lesson junkie
May. 18, 2009, 09:24 AM
Stubbens are wool flocked and easy to pick up at a good price.

SCF01
May. 18, 2009, 09:25 AM
Knowing that the horse has quite a wither now, what tree size should I be looking at? Or does that totally depend on what is going on directly beneath the wither?

JB
May. 18, 2009, 09:28 AM
Without seeing pictures of the horse and knowing the shape of his back and shape/length of his withers, at least, it's too hard to suggest brands and models. Some brands are only suitable for flat backs, others only for curvy, some models are great for tall withers, others not.

A picture of the saddle on him, the one that used to fit, would be helpful.

If the one that used to fit really DID, and now doesn't for the sole reason of a reduced topline, then I would suggest a front-lift pad or some front shims to take up the space(s) where muscle used to be. Much cheaper than a new saddle, and you can go back to regular padding if/when he gets his old shape back.

The next best option might be the same make/model of saddle that used to fit, but in a size down.

JB
May. 18, 2009, 09:29 AM
Knowing that the horse has quite a wither now, what tree size should I be looking at? Or does that totally depend on what is going on directly beneath the wither?

Wither clearance is just one of many components.

gloriginger
May. 18, 2009, 09:30 AM
Knowing that the horse has quite a wither now, what tree size should I be looking at? Or does that totally depend on what is going on directly beneath the wither?

you should have a saddle fitter come look at your horse and at least give you and idea of what you need for a saddle.

SparklePlenty
May. 18, 2009, 09:30 AM
Middleburg Tack Exchange has a TON of saddles if your in that area. you can also go on line and look to see what they have in their inventory.

mvp
May. 18, 2009, 09:41 AM
I bought a Caprilli long ago with the plan of having the CAIR panels replace with wool. If the general shape of the tree and panels work, this might be an option for you.

Smith Worthington did mine well and for a couple hundred, I think.

By the time I bought a full set of gullet plates and the reflocking, I had a saddle that worked on a lot of horses reasonably well.

SCF01
May. 18, 2009, 09:44 AM
Without seeing pictures of the horse and knowing the shape of his back and shape/length of his withers, at least, it's too hard to suggest brands and models. Some brands are only suitable for flat backs, others only for curvy, some models are great for tall withers, others not.

A picture of the saddle on him, the one that used to fit, would be helpful.

If the one that used to fit really DID, and now doesn't for the sole reason of a reduced topline, then I would suggest a front-lift pad or some front shims to take up the space(s) where muscle used to be. Much cheaper than a new saddle, and you can go back to regular padding if/when he gets his old shape back.

The next best option might be the same make/model of saddle that used to fit, but in a size down.'

It's hard to hook up with the saddle fitter. You normally have to get a group together to make it worth it for her.

I'll try and get some pics of his back and the saddle this week and post.

The county was bought for him from the fitter about 8 or so years ago. So it did fit him at one time, as he's aged, his back has changed. The fitter saw him and the saddle about 3-4 years ago and did some stuffing to make it work but wasn't thrilled with the fit. Oh, she also said my arse is getting larger and I should probably get a 17.5 seat. Thanks ;) I'm still in denial over that one.

Now I'm mostly riding a different horse and I'd like to get this saddle fitted to her and get him another one, a cheaper one. I can't afford another county. He doesn't get ridden regularly so don't want to spend a lot on a new saddle for him. Just something that fits and is somewhat comfy for me.

meupatdoes
May. 18, 2009, 12:46 PM
I think you really would be best off if you had someone help you with measuring your horse and sending the measurements in.

I believe Trumbull Mountain is very good about that, but there are others too.
I believe Advanced Saddle Fit is also good about fitting remotely.

Taking a little bit of time now to wield a flexicurve for ten minutes will likely save a lot of time, not to mention money, in the long run.

As people have said there is a lot more to it than just one or two components, and the last thing you want to do is purchase a wool flocked saddle where the tree is the wrong shape and/or width, because flocking can not change the tree.

SCF01
May. 18, 2009, 01:26 PM
Perhaps I'm getting ahead of myself. I'll do a tracing. Got the instructions from Trumbull Mtn. I've tried saddles from them before. They were very easy to work with.

Thanks.