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huntergirl007
May. 11, 2009, 08:16 PM
The other thread got me thinking...

Can an F150 pull a horse trailer?! The trailer I'm using is a 2 horse...not sure what its called as it is not mine. But I am getting ready to move my boy and possibly trailer to lessons every week or so. I have access to trailer whenever, and access to F150 VERY easily. Or I have access to Dodge 3500 dually heavy duty super cab blah blah blah...its big! :lol: I don't speak "truck".

Also, I am getting my first truck when I get my liscence in July! I'm looking for something like an F150 and even though it is not MANDATORY, I would like to learn to trailer my own horses. :D Are these trucks okay?

Anyone ever heard of the "Rumble Bee"? Are they any better?

THANK YOU!

Pirateer
May. 11, 2009, 08:18 PM
What is the engine on the F-150?

I wouldn't tow with anything smaller than an F250.
That said, my teeny V6 Explorer has a hitch rated to pull about 4000lbs but ain't no way I'd tow a trailer with it.

I see lots of people towing with F150s and they are fine, but again depends on hitch and engine also.

enjoytheride
May. 11, 2009, 08:23 PM
Many 150s have v8s or v6s made for towing. It would depend on the setup on the truck and the size of the trailer. A smaller trailer perhaps without a dressing room or made of lighter material would work

huntergirl007
May. 11, 2009, 08:36 PM
My apologies! This should have been in the Off Course forum - guess I thought that's where I was! We'll see what the H/J people have to say :D

Not sure what the engine is but the trailer is smaller...just a stock with no dressing room. I would THINK it is made of lighter material but I do not speak "trailer" either.

SaturdayNightLive
May. 11, 2009, 08:41 PM
I wouldn't do it if I were you. I had an F150 for a bit and I tried to pull my trailer (empty) with it exactly once.

I really don't think an F150 is enough truck to stop a fully loaded horse trailer with any kind of ease.

Come Shine
May. 11, 2009, 08:43 PM
lol! Check out the Toyota Tundra thread in oc. It has lots of info on truck 'language'. Good luck! :)

eqrider1234
May. 11, 2009, 08:43 PM
Yes it can, depending on the engine it could do some wear and tear and have problems sooner than others. Almost anything can pull a trailer, ill never foget two years ago at hits ocala a mom and daughter pulled in with their two horse and a dressing room trailer being pulled by a ACURA of all things! I love acuras, i have one, but i would never pull a trailer with one :lol:

grandprixjump
May. 11, 2009, 08:46 PM
Anyone ever heard of the "Rumble Bee"? Are they any better?

THANK YOU!

If the "Rumble Bee" is what I think it is, a sport tuned pickup, I would steer clear of it for towing. It is designed for speed, maneuverability, and looks, NOT FOR REAL WORK...

Jaegermonster
May. 11, 2009, 08:46 PM
Almost anything CAN pull a trailer,

(emphasis mine)
but the 6million$? is should it?
As someone else said, I wouldn't pull anything with anything less than an F250 or 2500.
It's not the pulling, it's the stopping. and as Eqrider says, an F150 will show the wear and tear a lot sooner on the mechanical parts than a truck that is meant to be pulling.

camohn
May. 11, 2009, 08:49 PM
The other thread got me thinking...

Can an F150 pull a horse trailer?! The trailer I'm using is a 2 horse...not sure what its called as it is not mine. But I am getting ready to move my boy and possibly trailer to lessons every week or so. I have access to trailer whenever, and access to F150 VERY easily. Or I have access to Dodge 3500 dually heavy duty super cab blah blah blah...its big! :lol: I don't speak "truck".

Also, I am getting my first truck when I get my liscence in July! I'm looking for something like an F150 and even though it is not MANDATORY, I would like to learn to trailer my own horses. :D Are these trucks okay?

Anyone ever heard of the "Rumble Bee"? Are they any better?

THANK YOU!
My first truck and trailer : I had a 1/4 ton with the V8 and a steel 2 horse. The power was fine but definitely got anti sway bars installed pronto or else the trailer started to walk the truck at around 55 to 60 MPH...not a fun thing.....if I did it again I would want a lighter (aluminum) trailer. It also depends on how far and fast you will be going. If you are doing local shows and not much highway miles then you would be fine.

Sparky Boy
May. 11, 2009, 08:58 PM
An F150 with an 8' bed or 4-door F150 with a V8 can safely pull a 2 horse non-dressing room trailer. Make sure the truck has a brake controller and you'll be fine for local hauling.

I pulled this set-up for several years and never had a problem.

dghunter
May. 11, 2009, 09:09 PM
We have an F150 that's used to haul our trailer without any problems. We have a two horse gooseneck with a dressing room. It has no problems hauling our two horses (one is about 1200lbs and the other is about 1000lbs) together. I believe we did get some extras put in to make it more capable of hauling a trailer but am not positive. We've had it for four years and used it weekly to haul an hour to lessons and back and haven't had one problem :)

Equibrit
May. 11, 2009, 09:11 PM
Are you demented. Of course it can.

Serah
May. 11, 2009, 09:45 PM
This thread literally made me laugh out loud... I have an F150 and I pull an oversized 2 horse bumper bull Merhow with a dressing room with trunks, tack and two BIG horses on it ALL THE TIME.... I have no trouble stopping at all and honestly haven't yet felt my truck struggle at all... That being said, I also have an F350 super duty that pulls a custom made 4star 5 horse gooseneck with an extra large dressing room.... with that fully loaded, I can feel that truck sweat a little bit going uphill thru the smokey mountains, but thats about it....

Of course it can pull a horse trailer...

appdream
May. 11, 2009, 11:51 PM
We haul a two horse gooseneck with a dressing room with our F150 with the Tritan 8. The only place it lags is our driveway, 90 degree turn and a steep incline.

We did have an extra leaf put into the rear springs. This means if we hook up a tag-a-long the bumper only drops a inch or two, rather then four or five. It was well worth the few hundred dollars it cost.

Renae
May. 12, 2009, 12:08 AM
Yes, what engine is in the F150?

Does the F150 have a proper hitch? Is the ball the right size and does it have the same kind of wiring end as the trailer?

How much does the trailer weigh loaded and how much is the truck rated to pull?

We had someone buy a horse once and they pulled up with a 1/2 ton Chevy with a lift kit pulling a very small 2 horse bumper pull. The trailer was hooked to the ball on the bumper. Only the rear axle of the trailer was on the ground! We borrowed them a F150 with a proper hitch just so we could feel comfortable that the horse was getting home safe :eek:

Savoy 8
May. 12, 2009, 12:09 AM
I pulled a 3 horse trailer from PA to NC, with 3 TB's on it. AND HAD NO PROBLEMS!! the F150 pulled great!

PNWjumper
May. 12, 2009, 12:10 AM
I pulled a 3H bumper pull for 5 years with a Dodge Ram 1500 Hemi. I hauled 3 large horses, all associated tack, and 1/4 ton of hay (in the bed of the truck) frequently to horseshows....and several times over mountain passes. I never had any problems with hauling and I never had any problems with stopping. I think the newer made-for-hauling F150s/Dodge 1500s/Chevy 1500s can all haul a lot more than older versions of the same trucks. I seriously loved that Dodge and never felt that I needed a bigger truck for a second while hauling with it.

Once I decided that I wanted to move up to a bigger trailer, though, we picked up a bigger truck....now we can't afford the bigger trailer :lol:. So for now I haul the same 3H BP trailer with my F-350. I don't feel a whole lot of a difference with the exception of hauling up big hills where the F350 obviously has a lot more ability to get a heavy trailer up a hill faster.

Kementari
May. 12, 2009, 12:37 AM
I haul with a 17 year-old half-ton Chevy (with a real hitch :eek:). My trailer is small and light (selected specifically to go with the truck - and just as old :lol:), with no dressing room, and my horses aren't huge, either. It hauls beautifully. Among other things, it hauled my horses from Idaho to New Hampshire - and for those not geographically inclined, there are just a few mountains in the middle, there. ;)

On the other hand, when I had to borrow a trailer for a day, even though it was still within the specs for what the truck could haul, it was heavier than mine and I could definitely feel it. It wasn't so bad as to be unsafe, but I definitely wouldn't have wanted to go any heavier.

Ibex
May. 12, 2009, 12:49 AM
For local towing it should be more than enough if it's set up properly to tow.... If you plan on towing greater distances or heavier loads a 3/4 may be in order.

FWIW, the new half tons seem to be rated at 8800lb to tow. Most smaller 2-horse trailers are only rated at 7,000 loaded.

poltroon
May. 12, 2009, 03:01 AM
Especially since you do not have your license yet and will be a new driver, I recommend that you find yourself a trailering mentor who can help teach you to drive the truck and trailer and who will help you select an appropriate truck for what you will tow. I was very fortunate to have someone like this who was in the passenger seat the first time I was hauling, and it was very helpful.

An F-150 can pull a two horse, but you need to be paying attention to the weight of the trailer and the specific set up of the truck. Not all F-150s are set up for towing, and among all the pickups, they are very configurable, so the tow rating can vary considerably from truck to truck. A marginal truck is more likely to need expensive and inconvenient repairs.

Finally, the factory hitch on most vehicles is only rated to 5,000 lbs. Make sure you get a weight-distributing hitch which tremendously improves the rig stability and ups your limit to 10,000 lbs. The extra capacity is cheap insurance.

Finally, since you're talking about a borrowed trailer and possibly a borrowed truck, be aware that the electrical connection to the brake controller isn't necessarily the same for all trailers.

bumknees
May. 12, 2009, 06:31 AM
These trucks used to haul everything. 2 horse bumper pulls 4 horse goosneck w/ dressing rooms. Course they were built to do this. What is with todays trucks to where you have to ask if a truck can pull this or that?
I have a 78 ( yeah you read that correct) F150 lariat ranger with a 400 engen can haul my house if I wanted it to... I also remember the station wagons hauling 2 horse bumper pulls noone thought a thing of it..

MintHillFarm
May. 12, 2009, 06:38 AM
I have a 2006 F150 and it pulls my Hawk trailer, a 2 horse, with a dressing room fine. I only ship one horse as he is the only one that goes off property.
It is the 5.7 engine. The trailer is aluminum over steel. I also have the hitch set up with the sway bars, so the ride is very good. The newer 150's are rated to tow much higher then the older ones.

Everythingbutwings
May. 12, 2009, 08:57 AM
While it is good to be planning ahead, I wouldn't recommend a new driver to try towing anything at all until you've had a bit of experience just driving a vehicle in traffic for a while.

Learning to read the traffic around you, judging the rate of speed and amount of room needed to change lanes, maneuvering at highway speeds, etc. Once you can consistently manage that, find someone to give you some practice with a trailer in a nice empty parking lot with some cones to get familiar with the additional length and turning radius of hauling.

And yes, an F150 can tow a two horse with a good weight distribution hitch, brake controller, and towing package. I've done it just fine but would never go back now that I've been using a heavier duty truck. The difference is noticeable. :yes:

Evalee Hunter
May. 12, 2009, 09:00 AM
My first truck and trailer : I had a 1/4 ton with the V8 . . . .

Could you fill us in as to EXACTLY what truck you had? I can't think what a 1/4 ton would be, unless you are talking one of those "mini" trucks we used to see a lot of & I don't know of any of those that had a V-8 engine.

Trixie
May. 12, 2009, 09:03 AM
I'm inclined to say wait until you're a more experienced driver. If you haven't yet gotten your license, you likely shouldn't be pulling a trailer until you've put in some serious hours behind the wheel. I've seen enough trailering near-incidents where the saving factor was in the driver's experience, not the vehicle.

Evalee Hunter
May. 12, 2009, 09:07 AM
WHEELBASE Take a measuring tape when you look at trucks! Measure from the center of the front wheel to the center of the rear wheel on the same side - this is your wheelbase. Is the wheelbase at least 114" ... better yet 120" OR MORE?

The longer your wheelbase the better control you will have during a hard braking or a quick change of lanes during an emergency or when you hit a deep pothole.

The difference between the "old" trucks & the new ones (at least one of the most significant differences) is wheelbase. All trucks used to have an 8' bed so they had around a 133" wheelbase ... which gave you a lot of sideways stability & a lot of resistance to rollover type accidents. Now, a "standard" bed is 6 ft., a long bed is 8 ft. & a "short" bed? I don't know but it is way too short to give you enough wheelbase to tow a horse trailer.

A 150/1500 will haul one or two horses fine if it

(1) has the wheelbase
and
(2) is set up for it (already been explained).

Evalee Hunter
May. 12, 2009, 09:12 AM
Personally, I started my daughter driving the horse trailer when she was 13. When we were getting ready for events, she needed to go out & back up the truck & hitch the trailer & then she needed to back the trailer to where we could load it. She needed to check tire pressures & truck oil level & what have you. There's a WHOLE LOT more to safe trailering than just driving.

Once she had her permit she started driving the trailer on the road with me with her. We did many, many hours that way on all kinds of road in all kinds of weather (she competed often). After a while (a year, maybe) she was on her own.

Equibrit
May. 12, 2009, 09:37 AM
WHEELBASE Take a measuring tape when you look at trucks! Measure from the center of the front wheel to the center of the rear wheel on the same side - this is your wheelbase. Is the wheelbase at least 114" ... better yet 120" OR MORE?

The longer your wheelbase the better control you will have during a hard braking or a quick change of lanes during an emergency or when you hit a deep pothole.

The difference between the "old" trucks & the new ones (at least one of the most significant differences) is wheelbase. All trucks used to have an 8' bed so they had around a 133" wheelbase ... which gave you a lot of sideways stability & a lot of resistance to rollover type accidents. Now, a "standard" bed is 6 ft., a long bed is 8 ft. & a "short" bed? I don't know but it is way too short to give you enough wheelbase to tow a horse trailer.

A 150/1500 will haul one or two horses fine if it

(1) has the wheelbase
and
(2) is set up for it (already been explained).

HOGWASH !

badawg
May. 12, 2009, 10:31 AM
Poltroon explained it nicely. I have what many refer to as a "Heavy 1/2 Ton" or an F-150 set up nearly to the specs of a lower end f-250. It is rated to tow 9500 lbs, or more than enough to haul my large 2H BP trailer with dressing room. It is equipped with a weight distributing hitch, larger brakes and Ford's most powerful V8 engine. This is one beast of and F150, and I love it. That said, my next truck will be a 3/4 ton. I would like a gooseneck trailer, and it's been tough to find one within my weight limits for my trucks capabilities. As for your skills, definitely have someone start teaching you how to drive with a trailer soon. It's a whole new set of skills, on top of just driving. That said, I wouldn't start driving a trailer any distance by yourself until you've spent a fair bit of time behind the wheel of a car without a trailer first!

SonnysMom
May. 12, 2009, 10:44 AM
My first truck was a F-150 extended cab with a full sized bed. It towed an all steel 1974 xtra high/xtra wide trailer just fine. The next two trucks I had were K1500's both extended cab short beds and I have a 2 horse WB sized Trailet w/dressing room. I always had the appropriate box hitch but have never had the weight distributing hitch. The F-150 had 175,000 miles on it and hubby did have to rebuilt the tranny at 150,000 miles.

I prefer the 2500 that I have now but the F-150/1500 was just fine.

It is interesting how attitudes about trailering change over time. One of my fellow boarders told me about when she was a teenager. She got her drivers license and the next weekend was hauling to foxhunting with the trailer and the family station wagon by herself. We are talking about 35 years ago. This would have been an all steel trailer so pretty heavy. Back then many people towed with the family station wagon. With no electric brake boxes etc...

I do prefer towing with a truck and I think an electric brake box that is properly adjusted is essential.

I would also suggest to the OP to take it out empty a few times to get used to it. I also suggest that the OP ride in the empty trailer while somebody else drives it around a parking lot. I think this provides a lot of insight into what the horse feels when you turn, start up and brake. I know riding in a trailer is not legal in most states - hence suggesting in the local mall parking lot.

wizard
May. 12, 2009, 11:08 AM
I have always pulled with a chevrolet silverado (the equivalent of the F150.) It is my main car and the mpg on the 250 would be terrible. I have a 3200lb 4 star gooseneck and have not had trouble. I think you might have trouble with an old steel trailer or two horses going up a mountain.

DLee
May. 12, 2009, 11:21 AM
Back in the day, I had on occasion to pull a two horse trailer with a Datsun pickup more than once. A friend told me it looked like an ant dragging a loaf of bread. :lol: I wouldn't recommend it!
I did pull a two horse for quite awhile with an F150, but it really didn't have the power to pull two horses up hills all that well. It could do it, but we were definitely in the slow lane. I love my F350. :yes:

poltroon
May. 12, 2009, 11:33 AM
These trucks used to haul everything. 2 horse bumper pulls 4 horse goosneck w/ dressing rooms. Course they were built to do this. What is with todays trucks to where you have to ask if a truck can pull this or that?
I have a 78 ( yeah you read that correct) F150 lariat ranger with a 400 engen can haul my house if I wanted it to... I also remember the station wagons hauling 2 horse bumper pulls noone thought a thing of it..

The difference is that the more recent vintages of trucks have been marketed as a more all-purpose vehicle... to be what the infamous Terry of rec.equestrian used to call "shrub-toting yuppiemobiles" :D . That happened in part because trucks did not have to meet the same safety and efficiency standards as passenger cars, and so Detroit could make a much larger profit on them. To make them more comfortable for everyday driving, they changed the suspension and the design in ways that make them less appropriate for towing, particularly on some versions of the F150.

The older station wagons were built more like trucks of today, with rigid steel frames. They were much heavier and they had larger engines. Today, passenger cars are built with crumple zones - which are intentional weak spots in the unibody frame - that make them much much safer in a crash, but also make them less appropriate for towing, because of the every day stress that adds to the frame of the vehicle.

poltroon
May. 12, 2009, 11:36 AM
As far as whether a young driver should tow at all, I think it depends quite a bit upon the temperament of the person. I remember my friend denting her car the first week she had her license. I probably would have been safe to tow after the first year. Of course, more experience is better.

But, OP, a good way to practice would be to put a glass of water in your cupholder and fill it fairly close to the top. If you're driving well enough for a horse trailer, the water won't spill. Soft turns, quiet moves, etc.

drmgncolor
May. 12, 2009, 12:19 PM
I haul a two horse perfectly fine with my 2001 F150 Lariat Edition 5.4 V8 Triton. I had new brakes put on and with the trailer brakes, stopping a full load... even in an emergency... is not a problem in the least. Of course is was built to tow right from the factory complete with transmission cooler. There is a a lot of good information in this thread, but I disagree with the people that say you need a 250 or higher. I wouldn't tow an American trailer with anything less than a 150 or a Suburban/Tahoe (with tow packages) though.

Pick up this book: http://www.amazon.com/Complete-Maintaining-Servicing-Trailer-reference/dp/0876056869/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1242145115&sr=8-2

Trixie
May. 12, 2009, 12:26 PM
Most 16 year olds have not been learning to pull a trailer since they were 13, since many parents don't actually start teaching their children to drive until it's acceptable under the law for them to do so.

It's not just the ability of a 16-year old to drive smoothly, it's the ability to predict and react safely to the movements of other drivers. The place to learn to do that is not with a horse trailer attached.

Trakehner
May. 12, 2009, 12:42 PM
I've gotta' smile...there sure has been "bracket creep" when it comes to towing.

When I was a kid, if we weren't in the barn 10 horse van, we were in somebody's station wagon pulling a steel 2-horse trailer...and without an equalizing hitch either.

Later, I towed with a full-sized Ford Bronco with a 5 liter engine and C-6 3-speed automatic transmission. Had a REESE equalizing hitch this time and towed a Featherlite extra-wide/tall trailer usually hauling an 18.2 hand Shire and sometimes with another horse along. I towed all over the eastern half of the country, up and down hills etc. and did great for over 100K miles. I always made sure the brake controller was adjusted very well and it worked great. It worked hard of course, so what, and was fun to drive.

More recently, towed with a half-ton Chevy Avalanche...big and not a lightweight vehicle. Used an Equalizer hitch this time. 5.7 liter engine, automatic transmission and a very fancy truck inside (ugly outside though). I towed a Corn-Pro 16' steel stock trailer...usually with almost 18 hand Shire and a carriage. Went all over the east coast with this rig too...New Hampshire, Tennessee and everywhere in between. It worked hard on the looooong hills, but again, did wonderful for 100K miles.

Now, 2009 24' Eby trailer, 2008 Dodge dually diesel...towing is absolutely effortless...the truck couldn't care less what I have behind it. Love the big trailer and dressing room.

Do I prefer a 1 ton dually for towing? Oh heck yes! No comparison.

Would I tow with a half-ton? Oh heck yes! I use what I have and tow accordingly...maximizing safety with the best types of hitch and brake controllers...the same way I tow with the big truck.

RedTahoe
May. 12, 2009, 12:47 PM
1. What year F-150?
2. How many miles?
3. What body style? Single cab? Extended Cab? Quad Cab?
4. Engine Size?
5. Transmission? Rebuilt? Same? New?
6. What type of material is the trailer constructed from? Steel? Aluminum?
7. Bumper pull or Gooseneck?
8. Slant load or straight load?
9. One horse at a time, or two horses?
10. Horses or ponies? Regular horses or drafts?

^ These are all questions that will help answer your question about the F-150 and trailers.

As I stated in the OC section, we haul with a '97 Chevy Tahoe 4WD 2DR, and it tows like a dream (built to tow). We've also towed with an '87 Silverado and an '04 Silverado. The '87 Silverado didn't work too well, but the '04 (extended cab) did.

rugbygirl
May. 12, 2009, 01:20 PM
As someone else said, I wouldn't pull anything with anything less than an F250 or 2500.
It's not the pulling, it's the stopping. and as Eqrider says, an F150 will show the wear and tear a lot sooner on the mechanical parts than a truck that is meant to be pulling.

Nonsense. A lot of the F150s are specifically built to tow. Where did you come by this "fact" that only 250s or 2500s are tow vehicles? Any vehicle that tows will show a bit more wear and tear than one that doesn't...it's harder work for the truck. It is about stopping power, but trucks have TOW RATINGS based on what they can safely tow (and stop). It's in the owner's manual. If your loaded horse trailer weighs less than your truck's towing capacity, you can pull it. End of story.

Now, sometimes trucks are modified after they leave the factory. The addition of heavy-duty springs and suspension, and a transmission upgrade (maybe even an engine upgrade) can bring up the towing capacity considerably. Make sure you know exactly which model truck you have and whether or not there are modified parts. Likewise, if someone modified your truck to be more of a speed machine, it might LOSE towing capacity (like gearing the transmission for less high-end torque but better acceleration and higher top-speed).

I have a Dodge 1500 (Dodge F150, basically) with a heavy-duty rating. It is the extended cab with a standard box, and it pulls my aluminum two-horse (loaded with two DRAFT horses) handily. The loaded trailer is less than the truck's rated capacity (7500 lbs). We also towed the same trailer with an old full-size Bronco that had upgraded suspension and a major transmission re-work.



In terms of wheelbase, "trucks today" do not necessarily have shorter wheelbases OR narrower wheelbases. Some do, some don't. The factory takes those into account when providing the tow rating though ;) A shorter wheelbase on the tow vehicle can make for a tougher tow. Because horse trailers are comparatively tall and not very aerodynamic, they can have a tendency to act as a big sail. With a shorter wheelbase, you'll do more correcting for that than on a longer wheelbased vehicle with a similar towing capacity. Experience here :) Then again, the shorter wheelbase tends to give a bit better maneuverability overall, and is easier to back up into the hitch. LOL. If you do find that a bumper-pull trailer seems to be pulling your truck a bit (you have to correct a lot with the steering wheel) you can install sway bars, which connect to the trailer and truck.


A "Rumble Bee" is a specific model of F-150 that is aimed at truck racing. It too will have a published towing capacity, but it probably isn't as high and it definitely won't perform as well as an F150 that is built for work (heavy duty models).

Evalee Hunter
May. 12, 2009, 01:30 PM
Most 16 year olds have not been learning to pull a trailer since they were 13, since many parents don't actually start teaching their children to drive until it's acceptable under the law for them to do so.

It's not just the ability of a 16-year old to drive smoothly, it's the ability to predict and react safely to the movements of other drivers. The place to learn to do that is not with a horse trailer attached.

It is absolutely & perfectly legal for a child of any age to drive on private property - & I made it CLEAR that my daughter drove the trailer ON OUR OWN LAND, hitching it & backing it to where it would be loaded, etc.

Actually, a child who is a terrific cross-country event rider is likely to make a terrific driver from their first time behind the wheel.

Furthermore, it is quite usual for farm children to drive all sorts of vehicles prior to the age of getting a learner's permit - tractors, for example, can be (legally) driven on the road by children, even pulling a loaded hay wagon. When I was growing up in a farm community, most kids got their driver's license on the first day they could do so as they already drove competently, having driven trucks of various sizes all over the farm.

Trixie
May. 12, 2009, 01:55 PM
It is absolutely & perfectly legal for a child of any age to drive on private property - & I made it CLEAR that my daughter drove the trailer ON OUR OWN LAND, hitching it & backing it to where it would be loaded, etc.

Actually, Evalee, no, you didn’t. What you said was:



Personally, I started my daughter driving the horse trailer when she was 13. When we were getting ready for events, she needed to go out & back up the truck & hitch the trailer & then she needed to back the trailer to where we could load it. She needed to check tire pressures & truck oil level & what have you. There's a WHOLE LOT more to safe trailering than just driving.

Once she had her permit she started driving the trailer on the road with me with her. We did many, many hours that way on all kinds of road in all kinds of weather (she competed often). After a while (a year, maybe) she was on her own.

There’s nothing about where you taught her to drive, and I don’t know what your personal circumstances are because you didn’t include them.

But I stand by my point: MOST 16 year olds in this country don’t start learning to drive trailers at 13. Most don’t have the land to practice on. And we all know that 16-year-olds are prone to overshooting their own abilities and assuming that they're experienced enough to handle something that they aren't.

Furthermore, that doesn’t change the fact that NO 16 year old driver will have the skills that only come from experience on the road with other cars, and frankly, when someone is hauling something as big as a horse trailer, that experience is crucial. Particularly around here, since it’s quite urban, but anywhere, really.

Evalee Hunter
May. 12, 2009, 02:49 PM
Once she had her permit she started driving the trailer on the road

If that phrase doesn't tell you she drove on private property until she had her permit, I don't know how I would say it so you understood.

Trixie
May. 12, 2009, 03:06 PM
I'm sure there's plenty of places to drive that aren't YOUR land and that aren't considered a roadway, for instance, the parking lot at the mall, or a showgrounds where 11-year-olds regularly drive golf carts unsupervised. I apologize if you feel that I didn't consider your post carefully enough, but my original post on the matter was not directed at your personal circumstances.

Further, that doesn't change my point.

But hey, if you feel your teenager is totally competent behind the wheel hauling a live load, fine. I personally don't think that most of them are, nor do I think most of the general public is educated enough about safely driving around large rigs. I'd be less concerned about my daughter's ability to safely tow a trailer in ideal conditions (say, on your private farm) as I would be her ability to identify the idiot that's going to slam on the brakes in front of her and avoid the problem.

Because like I said, 16-year-olds, or those just getting their licenses, don't have adequate experience driving in traffic.

fair judy
May. 12, 2009, 05:12 PM
the day after i got my driver's permit i got behind the wheel of our family six horse imperator and drove it to virginia with five horses in it.

yes a f150 can pull a trailer. you need brake assist to drive just about any truck trailer combo, IMO. sway bars are not a necessity but do help.

Nickelodian
May. 12, 2009, 05:33 PM
This is for 2009, but here:

http://www.fordvehicles.com/trucks/f150/specifications/towing/

My truck is a Super Crew 4x2 145 inch wheel base 5.4L V8 6 speed automatic with a 3.73 Axle Ration. It is rated to pull 11,300 lbs.

My trailer is a 2 horse BP with tack room. Empty weight is 3500, loaded weight with two BIG horses 9500. I'm happiest hauling only one, but two works out just fine as well.

Jaegermonster
May. 12, 2009, 05:40 PM
Nonsense. A lot of the F150s are specifically built to tow. Where did you come by this "fact" that only 250s or 2500s are tow vehicles?


I don't think I pronounced it as "fact". I stated that personally it is not something I would do.
There is a reason why they make heavy duty trucks.
If it's a smaller trailer and not going on long trips it might be ok.
I haul a lot (3-4 days a week) and more than a few hours each way every time. I would not be comfortable with an F150 or a smaller trailer.

Ajierene
May. 12, 2009, 06:19 PM
Because like I said, 16-year-olds, or those just getting their licenses, don't have adequate experience driving in traffic.

But a lot of adults have no business in cars or pulling trailers. My old gelding took a trailer trip with a guy that towed horses for years and we all thought he wasn't that great of a driver. Low and behold, while my gelding never refused to get into a trailer, he refused to get in THAT PARTICULAR trailer ever again. It was a two horse straight load and he would get in other two horse straight loads, but NOT THAT ONE! (we thought it very funny).

On the other hand, there are a lot of adults and a lot of kids that are fine with trailering. In many states, you can get a 'farm permit' for your child, which allows them to drive farm equipment and sometimes (depending on the state) trucks off the farm. Usually this can be done for a 13 or 14 year old (yes, there is a lower age limit).

As far as trucks go, I have a Dodge 1500 (similar in engine/type to an F150) and it tows just fine. If the connection for the trailer brakes does not match the connection on the truck, they have adapters you can use. Be mindful of the towing capacity and wheelbase (6ft bed size is not enough-like Evalee said, at least 120"). Now if you are looking at an extend cab with a 6' bed, it may work-but check it out.

Driving a trailer is not that hard - you just have to be mindful that you have a trailer back there and account for it. I didn't start driving a truck and trailer until I had been driving for about 6 years. I did not have anyone to teach me and hence, I am not the greatest (backing the trailer up is not my thing), so I would recommend getting someone to help you with the nuances the first few times-no matter how long you have been driving a vehicle!

nlk
May. 12, 2009, 06:25 PM
We hauled for years with 1500 vehicles. We had a 2 horse gooseneck with rear tack and a dressing room. my old horse ROCKED any trailer he was in and we never had a problem even with two horses in the vehicle.

On the '95 my dad had a chip installed to help the engine and we had electric brakes.

If attached properly there is no reason a 1500 with the proper towing capacity can't haul a standard 2 horse trailer.

rugbygirl
May. 12, 2009, 07:19 PM
I don't think I pronounced it as "fact".

Actually, you did.


an F150 will show the wear and tear a lot sooner on the mechanical parts than a truck that is meant to be pulling.



I stated that personally it is not something I would do.
There is a reason why they make heavy duty trucks.

Yes, for even HEAVIER trailers. FYI, F150s can be "heavy duty" too. The classification is pretty meaningless unless it is qualified with a tow and payload rating.



If it's a smaller trailer and not going on long trips it might be ok.

If the trailer is within the towing capacity of the truck, short or long trip doesn't matter even a little bit. If the trailer ISN'T within the towing capacity, you shouldn't be driving it ANYWHERE. If you're having trouble with F150 trucks burning through transmissions, brakes or suspensions from towing things WITHIN THE TOW CAPACITY, then something else is wrong with the truck.


I haul a lot (3-4 days a week) and more than a few hours each way every time. I would not be comfortable with an F150 or a smaller trailer.

That's great. Drive what you're comfortable with. Don't make things up about smaller trucks just because you don't like them.

Jaegermonster
May. 12, 2009, 07:51 PM
Well, bless your peapickin' lil ol' heart rugbygirl.

huntergirl007
May. 12, 2009, 08:53 PM
1. What year F-150?
2. How many miles?
3. What body style? Single cab? Extended Cab? Quad Cab?
4. Engine Size?
5. Transmission? Rebuilt? Same? New?
6. What type of material is the trailer constructed from? Steel? Aluminum?
7. Bumper pull or Gooseneck?
8. Slant load or straight load?
9. One horse at a time, or two horses?
10. Horses or ponies? Regular horses or drafts?


Thank you all for your advice! :D

I'm not sure how many miles it will go. Max 30 mins at a time...we won't be travelling far and when we're going to shows we will be using another truck.
It's a quad cab. Not sure the engine size, but it is new. The trailer is steel (I am pretty sure) and it's a gooseneck. It's a straight load and only one horse at a time (but possibly two). One horse is a larger TB (I'll say 12000lbs MAX?) and the other one is a large pony.

But thank you all for the advice for sure! :) And NO - it will not be me driving the trailer and I really do not think I will be driving the trailer for a while. But I will be getting a truck and I wasn't sure, if I WANTED to ever tow every now and then, if a Rumble Bee or an F150 would work better. Sounds to me like the F150 is best :)

And I apologize to those who thought I was demented. Like I said, I just ride the horses, not too used to driving them around ;)

poltroon
May. 13, 2009, 02:04 AM
A gooseneck trailer is a pretty heavy two horse, and really pushing the envelope of most F150s. If the truck is borrowed, it's not likely to have a gooseneck hitch. (Even if it pulls a "gooseneck" type RV, that is a different hitch style.)

Sometimes the most dangerous part of hauling is pulling out of the driveway, so even short trips need to be taken seriously, especially if you will be in a semi-urban area or if there are hills.

Trixie
May. 13, 2009, 09:29 AM
But a lot of adults have no business in cars or pulling trailers.

I agree with you.

But at least an adult has the benefit of a few years of driving in traffic under their belt prior to hauling around a live animal.

Everythingbutwings
May. 13, 2009, 09:57 AM
With so many thousands of members on COTH, it is important to keep in mind that we are not all located in the same part of the country (much less the world!) and that traffic conditions vary widely from location to location.

Many of us are in areas where there is an enormous amount of traffic congestion and a high percentage of drivers who are not accustomed to the presence of agricultural equipment or livestock trailers.

With the increase in congestion, there is an increase in the lack of courtesy and patience of other drivers as well. Road rage and aggressive driving is a common occurrence in the area that I happen to live and travel in.

I am sure that lack of experience behind the wheel is not as much of an issue in less populated areas where far more of the terrain is flat and has good sight lines, fewer intersections and traffic signals.

Equibrit
May. 13, 2009, 10:35 AM
A review of the Rumble Bee;

Road Test: 2004 Dodge Ram Rumble Bee
By: Mike Magda
Posted: 10-31-04 21:48 PT

2004 PickupTruck.com

There isn’t a pickup in any showroom with a more ridiculous name than the Dodge Ram Rumble Bee. It’s a woefully misdirected attempt to draw on the proud history of the ‘60s musclecar era when Dodge had the exciting but affordable Super Bee midsize coupe. If you’re going to bring back a name, then bring back the original. What is a Rumble Bee? If change is necessary, how about Killer Bee? I’d rather see a truck just for girls called Queen Bee. Or one for seniors called Aunt Bee.

Dodge is promoting the Rumble Bee around the famed bumble bee stripes looping around the rear of the cargo box, but then they paste this silly name on those iconic graphics. In a real slap at the musclecar heritage, the package is being offered on 4x4 pickups. That’s how I can tell that no one was serious about building solid credentials for this truck. It appears to me as nothing more than a marketing exercise led by an uninspired committee of MBA interns who probably never drove a Super Bee, Challenger T/A or Hemi-powered Charger and have absolutely no understanding of the excitement, passion and impact those vehicles had on psyche of American performance enthusiasts in the ‘60s.

But the name isn’t all that’s wrong with this truck. It’s an expensive, cheesy cosmetic makeover that Dodge is trying to pass off as being collectible, promoting the overused and often undeserved “limited edition” label. In a show of mercy, only 3700 units will be produced. Hopefully all the owners will think of them as a collectible and lock them in the garage, keeping the streets safe from this rolling tribute to schlock

So what do you get for $2600 in addition to the bumble bee stripes? Lower body cladding, monochromatic color scheme in either black or Solar Yellow, yellow interior accent trim on doors and yellow center bezel, taillamp guards, chrome exhaust tip, aluminum fuel filler door and—hold your breath—a “unique” numbered plaque on the dash. Total MSRP for our test vehicle was $31,580, including $850 destination charge. That includes $595 for the Sport appearance group, $465 for tow package, $1,170 for 5-speed automatic transmission, $50 for 3.92:1 axle ratio, $995 for Hemi engine, $950 for 6-CD changer, $895 for 20-inch wheels and $245 for bedliner. Those are a lot of extras to support the Rumble Bee package

Otherwise the Rumble Bee—you have no idea how hard it is to write that name without cringing—is a spirited half-ton with a 345-horsepower Hemi under the phony hood scoop. As a mechanical exercise, the truck itself is wonderful but it’s nothing different than a regular cab, short bed Ram 1500 with a mid-level Sport trim and the Hemi option. This truck just has a lot of tawdry makeup that thankfully is only skin deep. Someone at Dodge had the insight in not allowing the MBA interns near the hardware. All the refinement, power, convenience and comfort built into the latest generation Ram pickup comes through when driving this truck. All you need are sunglasses and a hat so no one recognizes you behind the wheel.

poltroon
May. 13, 2009, 12:38 PM
lol, Equibrit! :D

feather river
May. 13, 2009, 08:25 PM
If that phrase doesn't tell you she drove on private property until she had her permit, I don't know how I would say it so you understood.

You know it made perfect sense to me also. Who could take it any other way? but on COTH, public school reading seems to be the norm:eek:

feather river
May. 13, 2009, 08:29 PM
I agree with you.

But at least an adult has the benefit of a few years of driving in traffic under their belt prior to hauling around a live animal.

I had to laugh when I read this. Think about it. An adult has the benefit of a few years of driving...prior to hauling around a live animal.

Wait--there is no prohibition in my state against anyone any age hauling around another human. No requirement that you have a few years of driving for that. God forbid we should haul an animal!

Don't mean to pick a fight here, but maybe I'm needing a break from sitting at my desk. This stuff is truly funny.:D

feather river
May. 13, 2009, 08:34 PM
Yes, for even HEAVIER trailers. FYI, F150s can be "heavy duty" too. The classification is pretty meaningless unless it is qualified with a tow and payload rating.
.

An F150 is a 1/2 ton and not a 'heavy duty'. The 3/4 and 1 tons [of all three brands] are 'heavy duty' because they are on truck rail frames and not on unibody frames, like the 1/2 tons are. The F150 is a 1/2 ton and not built on a rail frame.

But, yes I know you can tow with a 1/2 ton. The capacity is different, and part of the reason is that you are towing with the unibody, not with the rail frame. Go here for Ford's towing info.

http://www.fordvehicles.com/assets/pdf/towing/09_TrailerGuide.pdf

rugbygirl
May. 13, 2009, 08:38 PM
Well, bless your peapickin' lil ol' heart rugbygirl.

WTH?

Don't post on subjects you don't know the facts on. Pretty simple. I hardly think it is "peapickin' " to correct incorrect statements when someone asked a reasonable question and expected decent advice. :rolleyes:

Grow up. Being condescending and rude to me doesn't make you less wrong.

Jaegermonster
May. 13, 2009, 08:39 PM
Said the pot.
Well, isn't that special?

seeuatx
May. 13, 2009, 08:48 PM
I have an F150 (4.6 L V8) and towed a two horse trailer (steel, no dressing room) for the last 10 years. It was great local, excellent through Ohio (gotta love the flat), and did the job going to and from KY a few times and to and from Bristol, VA 4 or so times a year (through the WV mountains too) The only issue ever came on the steep up-hills on the highway, it just could not quite maintain the 65+ mph... I just stay in the right lane and don't push and it holds 55 just fine.

The truck has 180k miles on it, and this is the first year I had any major issues with it. Head gasket cracked and we are looking to replace. One could say it was from trailering... but then again, 10 years and 150k (bought it used with 30k) miles is not bad for heavy usage. The body is in great condition, and we found an engine for it so hopefully the Great White will be back in commission soon :)

rugbygirl
May. 13, 2009, 08:49 PM
Originally Posted by rugbygirl

Yes, for even HEAVIER trailers. FYI, F150s can be "heavy duty" too. The classification is pretty meaningless unless it is qualified with a tow and payload rating.
.

An F150 is a 1/2 ton and not a 'heavy duty'. The 3/4 and 1 tons [of all three brands] are 'heavy duty' because they are on truck rail frames and not on unibody frames, like the 1/2 tons are. The F150 is a 1/2 ton and not built on a rail frame.


Where did you come by that information? Half ton trucks (Domestic trucks) are body-on-frame. They are built from the chassis (basically, the frame) up. CARS are unibodies, and so are some SUVs (you can think of them as being built "body on down"). If you happen to be curious on how I came by this information, I used to work at the plant that made Silverados. :D

The Honda Ridgeline is a sort of car-crossover THING that is built on a unibody. Mmm, count up how many of those you see on the highway for an indication on how popular they are/were. Some little 1/4 ton trucks (Rangers etc.) have and are unibodies too.

In the nineteen SIXTIES F-150s were unibodies. :confused: Maybe that's what you're thinking of?

The reason I say that "Heavy Duty" is pretty meaningless is because it gets used in the automotive industry a lot the way "X-TREME" gets used in other industries. Heavy Duty can refer to suspension packages, transmission arrangements, frame qualities or engine models. On some models of truck "Heavy Duty" is stamped on the side...it's almost like a model number, tells you what's in the truck package (usually beefed up springs, a full size box, the bigger engine, sometimes better brakes, usually a tow package).

cloudyandcallie
May. 13, 2009, 08:50 PM
Go to your Ford dealer. He has the statistics in a brochure.
When I was shopping for a truck, the F250 was the truck that could pull a trailer with a 16.2 wb and a 16.0 TB. I opted for the F350.
I would ask your dealer and tell him the type of trailer and type(s) of horses.

TrotTrotPumpkn
May. 13, 2009, 08:56 PM
Sometimes the most dangerous part of hauling is pulling out of the driveway, so even short trips need to be taken seriously, especially if you will be in a semi-urban area or if there are hills.

Ditto. Friend wrecked her trailer 15 miles from home last winter on a way to a lesson (she is in her 50's by the way and has been driving trailers for decades).

I don't know if I agree that the dealership is the best place to get info. I've asked a few dealerships in the past around here (truck country too) about specs and safe towing and they were more of the mindset to say whatever I wanted to hear to buy the vehicle.

I'm a big fan of towing with more truck than I need (love to borrow my friend's 3/4 ton) but because I live in town and need to drive both vehicles I'd be buying the 1/2 ton right now too.

feather river
May. 13, 2009, 09:02 PM
Where did you come by that information? Half ton trucks (Domestic trucks) are body-on-frame. They are built from the chassis (basically, the frame) up. CARS are unibodies, and so are some SUVs (you can think of them as being built "body on down"). If you happen to be curious on how I came by this information, I used to work at the plant that made Silverados. :D

The Honda Ridgeline is a sort of car-crossover THING that is built on a unibody. Mmm, count up how many of those you see on the highway for an indication on how popular they are/were. Some little 1/4 ton trucks (Rangers etc.) have and are unibodies too.

In the nineteen SIXTIES F-150s were unibodies. :confused: Maybe that's what you're thinking of?

The reason I say that "Heavy Duty" is pretty meaningless is because it gets used in the automotive industry a lot the way "X-TREME" gets used in other industries. Heavy Duty can refer to suspension packages, transmission arrangements, frame qualities or engine models. On some models of truck "Heavy Duty" is stamped on the side...it's almost like a model number, tells you what's in the truck package (usually beefed up springs, a full size box, the bigger engine, sometimes better brakes, usually a tow package).

Well I sure won't argue with you if you worked in the plant. You know more than I do. I am a Dodge guy, and I know that you crawl under their Heavy Duty 2500 or 3500,and they are built on rails, just like the big trucks. And their 1500 is not. After reading your post, I went out and crawled under my older Chevy 1 ton dually, from 1987, and it sits on perhaps what you are describing. It does not sit on frame rails like my 2005 2500 and 3500 Dodges do.

Just when you think you 'know it all' [hehe], you learn something new! Thanks for the info.

huntergirl007
May. 13, 2009, 09:06 PM
Okay - so it's a no go on the Rumble Bee! :lol: I'm embarrassed to even be considering it now! Wowee. Haha!

And I think I'm just gonna try and organize the bigger Dodge I have an option with. It will be more difficult but I can try :) If not I will use the F150 but the person who will be driving the truck is experienced.

As for my OWN truck, I do not have the option of a 250 or 350 (although I would LOVE to...don't have the money to support the purchase OR the gas)! So I will be going with the 150 but I guess I will be careful with how much I trailer (as I attempt to learn). :)

Thank you SO MUCH for all your help!

rugbygirl
May. 13, 2009, 09:06 PM
feather river, You're just ahead of your time ;)

The big three are thinking of trying a unibody approach on the smaller trucks (possibly 1/2 tons) and SUVs.

I THINK that this is because Unibodies can be lighter and they can make them more fuel efficient...it isn't a popular idea in the truck-o-phile community :lol:

Working at the plant might not get you the knowledge anyway...working at the plant and having a truck-addicted significant other does :D

Jaegermonster
May. 13, 2009, 09:09 PM
Ditto. Friend wrecked her trailer 15 miles from home last winter on a way to a lesson (she is in her 50's by the way and has been driving trailers for decades).

I don't know if I agree that the dealership is the best place to get info. I've asked a few dealerships in the past around here (truck country too) about specs and safe towing and they were more of the mindset to say whatever I wanted to hear to buy the vehicle.

I'm a big fan of towing with more truck than I need (love to borrow my friend's 3/4 ton) but because I live in town and need to drive both vehicles I'd be buying the 1/2 ton right now too.

I have found all of the above to be true. Especially as far as the dealerships. Some salesmen can tell you about what you need to tow a boat or a jetski but don't have a clue as far as horses. Most of them haven't a clue at all about towing and just want to sell.
I also agree that it's better to be over than under trucked. The first time you get in an emergency while towing you will appreciate it.

feather river
May. 14, 2009, 12:40 AM
The reason I say that "Heavy Duty" is pretty meaningless is because it gets used in the automotive industry a lot the way "X-TREME" gets used in other industries. Heavy Duty can refer to suspension packages, transmission arrangements, frame qualities or engine models. On some models of truck "Heavy Duty" is stamped on the side...it's almost like a model number, tells you what's in the truck package (usually beefed up springs, a full size box, the bigger engine, sometimes better brakes, usually a tow package).

Well as I said, I do know Dodge, and their Heavy Duty signifies it is either a 2500 or a 3500. And it is built on rails, not on the whatever-kind-of-body their 1500 is on. I own both a 2005 2500 and a 3500 dually. The only difference I know of is the springs in the rear. I specked out both trucks and ordered them the same--Cummins and manual trans, 4X4, limited slip diff, etc. So I know the rear springs are the only diff. I then added those Firestone airbags to both trucks on the rear. Pretty awesome pullers and you can adjust the air in those bags to adjust the set of the rear end of the truck. I pull a 21 foot 3-horse 4Star slant, and a 28 foot 5-horse 4Star slant. Both trailers are air ride also. Bags on all 4 wheels. Both trucks will pull either trailer, but I prefer the feel of the rear end of the dually, plus its extra weight handling capacity, when pulling the 5-horse.

I run out west in the western mountains, big grades, snow in the winter, high winds at times. I am a part time horse hauler, in addition to moving my own, so I've gone coast to coast and into Canada with these trucks. I can't say a bad thing about them. And I used to be a Chevy guy--but couldn't do the Duramax thing. None of the diesel mechanics would recommend it. They all owned Fords, and they wouldn't even recommend the PowerStroke for my hauling. they all said get a Cummins.

Trixie
May. 14, 2009, 09:17 AM
I had to laugh when I read this. Think about it. An adult has the benefit of a few years of driving...prior to hauling around a live animal.

Wait--there is no prohibition in my state against anyone any age hauling around another human. No requirement that you have a few years of driving for that. God forbid we should haul an animal!

Last I checked, most of the humans that folks haul around don't require a trailer. And if they do, that's a whole different discussion. :winkgrin:

Everythingbutwings
May. 14, 2009, 09:38 AM
Wait--there is no prohibition in my state against anyone any age hauling around another human. No requirement that you have a few years of driving for that. God forbid we should haul an animal!



Actually, in most if not all states, it is ILLEGAL to have human passengers in a towed trailer.

Wikepedia - travel trailer (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Travel_trailer)

RV Forum - passengers in travel trailer (http://www.rvtravel.com/rvforum/viewtopic.php?t=4148) - handy tips about legality and good descriptions of what happens when live beings are involved in a trailer accident. :)

Dodge Diesel Truck Resource - riding in a camper (http://www.dieseltruckresource.com/dev/archive/index.php/t-24922.html) with the best quote
Does it really matter if it is legal? It's got to be one of the stupidest thing I ever heard of. Why would you allow anyone to ride in it?

Just fact checking. Carry on. :winkgrin:

MTshowjumper
May. 14, 2009, 10:02 AM
I have a 10yo F150 V8 4x4 that hauls my two horse (with my 16.2h and 17h TBs) with full dressingroom steel BP trailer all over the country just fine. I am origionaly from Montana and had to deal with a lot of mountain passes and it handeled those fine as well. I have done a lot of long trips with it, I moved from Montana to Virginia with it and later from Virginia to South Carolina, I also hauled for my boss from VA to CT with it. I use it very regularly to haul out for lessons as well. If you where only going to have a two horse bumperpull trailer and wanted to also have your truck as your main form of transportation I would definatly go with the F150 V8 (I would not use a V6). If I had a bigger trailer I would definalty want a bigger truck, but for a 2 horse BP my F150 is just dandy.

LetsChat
May. 14, 2009, 10:19 AM
You know it made perfect sense to me also. Who could take it any other way? but on COTH, public school reading seems to be the norm:eek:

I feel the same way. She specifically stated that she backed up and hitched the trailer and pulled it to where it was loaded. Where do you think she was doing that, on and interstate highway.... She pulled the trailer to where it would be loaded.... hmmmm let's guess, a wild one here, a FARM... Could it be. People are so quick to judge and nit pick. For Christ sake people, get off your high horses, you aren't perfect. People have been hauling horses for years, even without your almighty advice and even some of the nicest, best set up rigs have problems or accidents, with professional drivers. [Stuff] happens!!!
Phew, I was brewing that for the past page and a half of posts.

Trixie
May. 14, 2009, 10:33 AM
It could just as easily have been on a showgrounds or anywhere else that isn't Evalee's property but that isn't a public roadway. I've seen plenty of unlicensed drivers operating motor vehicles on horse show grounds that they don't own, without permission from the landowner. Do you actually think that every time some little 14 year old pony kid drives a golf cart the parent has checked with the owner of the showgrounds and made sure it's okay with them?

But again, her personal circumstances really don't have anything to do with the point I was making. It had to do with inexperienced drivers driving rigs. Most kids haven't been practicing for three years before getting their license, nor do they have adequate experience with other drivers on the roadway.

Everythingbutwings
May. 14, 2009, 10:41 AM
For Christ sake people, get off your high horses, you aren't perfect. People have been hauling horses for years, even without your almighty advice and even some of the nicest, best set up rigs have problems or accidents, with professional drivers. Shit happens!!!


Which is precisely why I find it ridiculous for people on these trailering topics to go to such lengths to tell inexperienced people who are just starting out with their first trailer that getting by with less is perfectly fine.

Getting some experience driving without a trailer attached is just good advice for someone thinking about hauling their horse in the not so distant future.

I think Evalee was just saying that her kid got some basic trailer 101 lessons before she would go out on the public roads.

feather river
May. 14, 2009, 01:19 PM
Actually, in most if not all states, it is ILLEGAL to have human passengers in a towed trailer.

Wikepedia - travel trailer (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Travel_trailer)

RV Forum - passengers in travel trailer (http://www.rvtravel.com/rvforum/viewtopic.php?t=4148) - handy tips about legality and good descriptions of what happens when live beings are involved in a trailer accident. :)

Dodge Diesel Truck Resource - riding in a camper (http://www.dieseltruckresource.com/dev/archive/index.php/t-24922.html) with the best quote

Just fact checking. Carry on. :winkgrin:

Don't be stupid. I meant you can take people in the car with you as soon as you have a license, but people are complaining about hauling a horse in a trailer. DUH

Everythingbutwings
May. 14, 2009, 01:24 PM
Don't be stupid Back at you, you know darned well we're not talking about putting horses in the back seat of the car, either.

Moderator 1
May. 14, 2009, 01:55 PM
Simmer down, folks! No need to get riled up over trucks and trailers. Of course folks are going to occassionally misread or misinterpret comments; just explain what you meant and move along. ;)

Thanks!
Mod 1

asterix
May. 14, 2009, 02:12 PM
To the OP, sorry this thread has gone so haywire. People come on here sometimes asking "can I safely tow my 2 clydesdales with my honda accord" so folks have a hair trigger about what they consider to be insufficient set-ups.
:D

Zillions of people tow a 2 horse bumper pull trailer with a truck that says "150" or "1500" on the back. The problem is that trailer weights and specs vary a TON and so do truck specs, even within what the truck makers call "150."

Two things to keep in mind:
1. Spec the ACTUAL truck and ACTUAL trailer - weight, length, equipment, towing capacity, etc of truck, weight of trailer. Know what hitch you need.
This page http://www.equispirit.com/info/towing.htm has a useful summary of all of this.

2. The dealers, I am sorry to say, are NOT reliable sources of what's safe. They really don't know, or aren't interested in telling you. I got all kinds of cockamamie stories from dealers, and when I started telling them what specs I wanted they just shut up and let me look at their inventory list to see if they had what I was looking for. Spec the truck from the manufacturer's info and go from there.

foursocks
May. 14, 2009, 02:14 PM
As someone who just got her first trailer, I would throw in another vote for being sure to get facts along with opinions on what truck can pull which trailer. I have a new Adam Julite WB with a dressing room and a side ramp- it is only a two horse BP, but it is not light.

I was told my friend's Land Cruiser could pull it by someone I thought would know better. She has pulled a much smaller two horse with it for very short trips and it struggled with that, so I fail to see how her car could be safe to pull my trailer!

I got our truck, a 1996 Dodge 2500 Cummins Diesel, before the trailer and went up in power because I figured better to be over-trucked than under-trucked when I finally decided on the trailer I wanted. Pulling my 1300 lb horse it gets 18-20 mpg, with both regular diesel and biodiesel, which is pretty fabulous, and chugs along very nicely, so I don't regret going for bigger.

feather river
May. 14, 2009, 02:36 PM
As someone who just got her first trailer, I would throw in another vote for being sure to get facts along with opinions on what truck can pull which trailer. I have a new Adam Julite WB with a dressing room and a side ramp- it is only a two horse BP, but it is not light.

I was told my friend's Land Cruiser could pull it by someone I thought would know better. She has pulled a much smaller two horse with it for very short trips and it struggled with that, so I fail to see how her car could be safe to pull my trailer!

I got our truck, a 1996 Dodge 2500 Cummins Diesel, before the trailer and went up in power because I figured better to be over-trucked than under-trucked when I finally decided on the trailer I wanted. Pulling my 1300 lb horse it gets 18-20 mpg, with both regular diesel and biodiesel, which is pretty fabulous, and chugs along very nicely, so I don't regret going for bigger.

As someone who has hauled professionally for the past 10+ years, I would advise anyone to get more truck than is needed. You never want to be on the margin with your equipment when going down the road. It just is not safe. And if you are considering pulling a BP, then my best advice is to get as long a wheel base on the tow vehicle as is possible--much less likely to jack-knife. [frankly, BP's scare me--much safer to be pulling a gooseneck with a truck that is a crew cab with an 8' box--I like those axles far apart on the truck, and the trailer wheels as far back there as is possible.] I know BP's are very popular, but please only use them for short distances and drive very carefully. I've seen too many of these in the ditch with either a horse trailer or a travel trailer kissing the SUV that was pulling them.

Oakstable
May. 14, 2009, 03:03 PM
I have a Ford 150 and a Logan 2-horse WB size BP.

I haul locally with one horse but if we had to go somewhere at a distance, I'd hire someone to take us.

I use to have a 250 but it is not practical with as little hauling as I do now.

Cheaper to pay someone with a bigger truck and rig.

rugbygirl
May. 14, 2009, 04:51 PM
but I prefer the feel of the rear end of the dually, plus its extra weight handling capacity, when pulling the 5-horse.

I hate pulling anything with duallys. They actually provide less traction and they have the added drawback of travelling constantly outside the ruts on the highway. They are godawful trying to pull something up a snow-covered hill. To each their own, I suppose. I have observed that most people who claim to prefer duallys are using a truck that is ridiculously over-powered for the job they want, so that's probably why people often claim to like them better. A dually F-350 with a giant oversized Diesel will just generally feel "better" pulling the same size trailer as someone's 1978 old Ford 1/2 ton. Give me the half-ton in a Canadian winter, personally.

I'm a little miffed by your "it scares me" comment. Something should only "scare" you if the activity is outside the manufacturer's engineered safety limits. For example, making your hitch fit your home-built trailer with plywood and duct tape additions. That would be "scary". A bumper pull behind an F-150 that is rated to tow it should not "scare" you. Maybe if it is being driven by someone with a cigarette in one hand and a cell phone in the other, maybe then, I guess.

A 1500 series truck with most V8s (think Dodge 318 engines and up) and a tow package can handle most small bumper pull trailers. Bumper pull trailers are not going to randomly jacknife in the middle of the highway, and goosenecks are not exactly a cinch to tow. Gooseneck models are only available in bigger, heavier trailers...which leads to even less visibility. Small bumper pulls are relatively easy to learn to drive and back up in comparison. Why haul around an 80% empty gooseneck with a big truck when all you need is a small bumper pull and a smaller truck? That's silly and wasteful. Full size trucks don't exactly have a zero marginal carbon footprint.

In my experience, people who drive larger trucks tend to be lulled into a false sense of security about how "safe" they are. If you're a crap driver, F-250 or F-150 pulling a trailer doesn't matter one iota...except that the bigger truck will do more damage to whatever you hit. And probably burn more gas.

Here are some true facts about trailer driving from a 26 year old woman, a former automotive industry line supervisor, who has hauled a Clydesdale and a heavy Thoroughbred all over Alberta, Canada in a two-horse BP behind a Dodge 1500 in ALL weather conditions:

1. Trucks have tow ratings, trailers have weights, horses have weights. Add up trailer weight, horse weight and weight of whatever else you put in there and if it is within the tow capacity you are 100% fine.

2. You will get into trouble if your vehicle isn't properly maintained. Trouble is about 10 times worse with a trailer. Ask me how I know. Cost of tow for F-150 = $53.99 with AMA membership. Cost of tow for F-150 plus trailer over the same distance = $349.99, AMA would not cover.

3. If you have bald or poor tires on your tow vehicle, pulling a trailer is stupid and dangerous. Your tow vehicle needs to have good traction and reliable steering response to achieve its tow rating.

4. Load the heavier horse on the drivers' side if you have a straight load. That way, if you get into trouble, you have a big moving weight tending to pull the truck ONTO the road as opposed to INTO the ditch.

5. Loading hay onto the trailer roof rack increases total height and wind resistance. You will have to correct more, especially in the wind. It also adds to the weight.

6. Many driving schools offer trailer-pulling courses. If you don't have someone decent to teach you, consider taking one. There are some things to know and you don't want to learn how to back a trailer into a tight spot in the middle of the crowded show grounds. Way less embarassing if you practice when no one is around.

==

In conclusion, driving skill, responsible vehicle maintenance and your vehicle's specifications are all variables that are of much more importance than what size your truck is.

feather river
May. 14, 2009, 07:15 PM
this is why they make different trucks and brands. to each his/her own. my wife doesn't like driving the dually either. she prefers her 2500. but before the dually I had a 2 ton Topkick, which I pulled a 7 horse with, with a gvw combined of around 32k lbs. So I like the feel of having a truck and trailer stuck to the road. I logged over 750K miles with that set up, and down sized to the Dodge 4X4 [for the winters out west] with the 5 horse--gvw combined when loaded of 23k lbs. Give me the dually any day.

And don't let the word "scare" scare you. I was just using that for "drama". Personally, give me a gooseneck any day over a bumper pull. Horses ride much better, and you don't have to worry about that bouncing up and down you get from the mechanics of having the trailer tongue weight sitting on the tail end of the tow vehicle. Much better having that weight sitting a few inches ahead of the back axle.

feather river
May. 14, 2009, 07:23 PM
One other comment. My daughter is younger than the previous poster. She drives either vehicle pulling either trailer and has been hauling all over for several years. She is not put off by either vehicle, and loves pulling the gooseneck over a bumper pull. She drives day or night, and has hauled horses coast to coast with me--both of us driving separately. If you are comfortable driving a stick and like a sports car feel and enjoy being behind the wheel, you shouldn't have a problem hauling horses. And well maintained equipment is a must.

huntergirl007
May. 14, 2009, 07:34 PM
but before the dually I had a 2 ton Topkick

This is what I really would like...but that's a whole new issue ;)

Everythingbutwings
May. 15, 2009, 07:01 AM
Another reason for carrying roadside assistance coverage when hauling - US Rider (http://www.usrider.org/)will come get your vehicle and trailer and tow you up to 100 miles.


TOWING - When your vehicle cannot be started or driven, the vehicle and/or horse trailer will be towed to the destination of your choice up to 100 miles by one of our authorized vehicles. I've had to use my coverage twice (thankfully, not while towing) and they were great.

authentic pony
May. 15, 2009, 10:03 AM
5 pages later and its still confusing on whether a 1/2 ton can pull a 2 horse.

My mom and I are looking into buying a truck and trailer. She's been to TONS of dealerships and has settled on working with a Chevy dealership that has been in the horse business for years. About 40% of the trucks at the horse shows come from him, and his daughter shows GP jumpers so I DO trust what he has to say.

He says a Chevy Silverado 1500 5.3L V8 extended cab 6'6" bed truck (the one we are looking at - which will be her every day vehicle too) will be just fine towing a 2 horse gooseneck with sideramp but no dressing room and 2 WBs.

Yet every time I read a thread on towing, I doubt it and think we need to get a bigger truck. I know I'd rather be in a 2500, but the dealership and my mom both say this setup will not be a problem.

asterix
May. 15, 2009, 10:42 AM
authentic, see the link in my post above. It's a math problem. But not a very hard one.
All you need to do is know HOW MUCH your trailer weighs empty, HOW MUCH more weight you will be adding with the horses and gear, HOW MUCH the truck in question (the actual truck, not some fantasy 150) weighs and is rated to tow, and WHAT KIND of hitch you will need.

If your numbers add up, you are fine. There are plenty of 150 setups that are safe for a 2 horse bumper pull, with 2 warmbloods, with a dressing room. I know, I have one. Truck is heavy duty, crew cab, long bed, quadrasteer, and my weight when loaded is well within its towing capacity. Your gooseneck almost certainly weighs more, but you need to know the numbers. Don't let anyone here tell you it won't work -- and don't rely on the dealer to tell you it will. Go by the numbers.

rugbygirl
May. 16, 2009, 04:22 PM
Good advice asterix, I'd also like to add that if the truck you want doesn't come with a gooseneck receiver (or hitch receiver for a bumper pull) and trailer brake controller, have it installed by the dealer as part of your negotiation :) You definitely want one, but if you install it on your own it will cost more.

Also, authentic pony, a lot of trailers can offer the same size/features but with varying weights. If the gooseneck you're considering works out too heavy, maybe look at aluminium models that are similar. I know that when I was looking, I needed the WB-size and I really wanted a full dressing room. Steel trailers would have put me over my tow capacity once horses and gear were added, but an Aluminium version of the same thing put me well within my tow rating. :D Have fun!

Jaegermonster
May. 16, 2009, 04:38 PM
5 pages later and its still confusing on whether a 1/2 ton can pull a 2 horse.

My mom and I are looking into buying a truck and trailer. She's been to TONS of dealerships and has settled on working with a Chevy dealership that has been in the horse business for years. About 40% of the trucks at the horse shows come from him, and his daughter shows GP jumpers so I DO trust what he has to say.

He says a Chevy Silverado 1500 5.3L V8 extended cab 6'6" bed truck (the one we are looking at - which will be her every day vehicle too) will be just fine towing a 2 horse gooseneck with sideramp but no dressing room and 2 WBs.

Yet every time I read a thread on towing, I doubt it and think we need to get a bigger truck. I know I'd rather be in a 2500, but the dealership and my mom both say this setup will not be a problem.

I think you should look at the book and the specs for that vehicle yourself and check out the numbers as opposed to how much your trailer weighs etc instead of just relying on what they tell you. I know a trailer with no dressing room is a pita though LOL Where are you planning to put all your stuff?
I would think that you would probably be close to the top of what the truck you mentioned should be doing though. Me, I like to have a little bit extra. but it depends on how much you will be pulling, how far etc.