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florida foxhunter
May. 11, 2009, 12:38 PM
I have been approached by my trainer to lease my wonderful all around horse to one of her best students for an /EQ horse for possibly a year.......the horse would be boarded there, where I take lessons on other youngsters twice a week, so I'd see him often. I can write the contract however I want......jumping limitations, my personal use, number of shows, insurance, etc....of course, all ultimately effecting the cost of the lease I'm sure.
I've NEVER leased a horse.....and am nervous about this one. He's my "wonderful old age-(my old age, haha) horse"...fancy, sweet, honest, sound (barefoot!!)and Mr. Perfect in my book. He was just champion of Adult Amateurs with me (I hadn't shown in over a year and just did it on a whim)....
I'd appreciate any stipulations or suggestions you may suggest if it were YOUR favorite nine year old horse!! I'd like to see him show some at 3'6......and Don Stewart once told me his highest use would be to lease him as a top EQ horse........so it interests me. A little extra cash would be nice to help offset my huge farm expenses, but I'm not interested in doing something that doesn't also consider the best interest of my friend and partner, Mr. Perfect (haha).......
Thanks for any input anyone may feel like giving~!

TwoDreamRides
May. 11, 2009, 01:02 PM
This isn't answering your question, but when I was looking at your site I noticed you went to Hitchcock Woods and rode with one of my good friends, Erin w/ Lily!

katie16
May. 11, 2009, 01:03 PM
Among other considerations, make sure you put an "out" clause in it so if for some reason you are not happy with the way things are going, you can refund the remainder of the lease and take back possession of the horse. Sounds like you are quite familiar with the situation that the horse will be in so it is less likely to be needed - but you never know and you will regret it if you do want to re-claim him and cannot do so easily.

QHmom
May. 11, 2009, 01:23 PM
I second that- friend had really bad experience on lease with her pony! It foundered really badly, trainer asked owner to pick it pony and owner did. Now owner cant get leasors to pay up on remaining balance or medical due on pony they foundered. The leasors were responsible for pony as stated in contract!

Make sure there is a complete understanding - written and signed on both side. My friend has attorney handling the issue right now....

vxf111
May. 11, 2009, 01:58 PM
If it's going to be a somewhat unique lease (and it sounds like it) and you loff loff loff this horse, I'd shell out a couple hundred bucks and get an attorney to draft it for you. You'll sleep better at night. Form, cookie cutter leases don't really work well when you want a unique lease relationship.

TheOrangeOne
May. 11, 2009, 02:16 PM
I'd be iffy about it, personally. I have a friend who is an equine lawyer, and she can write up a contract for you that is specific for you. Her website is http://www.nelsontucker.com/Tamara_Leigh_Tucker.html

Tex Mex
May. 11, 2009, 06:47 PM
OK this might sounds harsh, but if you aren't going to trust the kid and the trainer to have free rein over the horse, and to make all (or at least most) of the decisions about his care and showing, then you may not want to do it at all. I say this because it won't really be fair to anyone if you are going to be riding him and be super involved. If it's a good, competitive equitation rider, then she is going to need to focus all her time and energy on her partnership with this horse, and she'll probably be working really hard and spending a lot of money to do it. If it were me leasing the horse, I would only do it if I knew the owner was going to let me and the trainer do what we feel is best for the horse based on our goals for the Big Eq ring. I don't mean to assume you are a a control freak (haha!) but it would be really hard to have a lease in the barn with someone like that.

Pirateer
May. 11, 2009, 07:43 PM
OK this might sounds harsh, but if you aren't going to trust the kid and the trainer to have free rein over the horse, and to make all (or at least most) of the decisions about his care and showing, then you may not want to do it at all.

If it were me leasing the horse, I would only do it if I knew the owner was going to let me and the trainer do what we feel is best for the horse based on our goals for the Big Eq ring.

Are you SERIOUS?

Pirateer
May. 11, 2009, 07:47 PM
I'd consider listing the following in your lease:

Vet/Farrier requirements (must have X supplement, must have X injection, must have X type of shoes every X weeks with X Farrier, any additional vet work responsibility of lessee and on approval of owner ONLY)
Showing: # of shows allowed per month, etc. Or on approval of owner first, etc.

There is a medium between being difficult to deal with and making sure they don't run amok with your fancy packer pony :)

florida foxhunter
May. 11, 2009, 10:10 PM
Thanks, hope the ideas continue here. I wasn't the one asking to keep riding him.......the trainer had offered it. However I wouldnt want the pounding on him of my showing him and them too..........We're all pretty good friends here..........I'm just exploring my heart to see if I want to lease him at all. HIS best interests are uppermost...but I do think it'd be fun to watch him in EQ in which he's totally capable. It's a lovely young lady who I know would be good to him...........It's up to me...and since it's all so close contact, it needs to work to make everyone happy or we won't do it........I was just trying to educate myself on what to even consider!!
Tex Mex, I don't board at this barn, I have my own farm 15 miles away with 12 other horses I own.....six of whom I try to keep ridden, in training, etc........so I don't have a lot of time to meddle.......but I do have this horse's best interest at heart. He's been wonderful to me and is my partner.......we've been successful beyond my wildest dreams in many disiplines including hunters, foxhunting championships, schooling prelim eventing, and he takes care of me every step of the way.

mvp
May. 11, 2009, 10:29 PM
This is a tough decision. If you do lease, the fact that you guys are all friends is the top reason to ask for everything you want up front. Let them say no. Be ready to think creatively about how to make new terms that work for both sides. Being friends is also a reason to write a very detailed lease, including the Out option.

I have found that when a friendship survives legal negotiations, it gets stronger. When things get uncomfortable and people figure out a way to politely back out before agreements are signed, friendships are preserved. There's only one option left... the bad one... and it comes from not being up front about what you want, need and expect.

katie16
May. 12, 2009, 07:55 AM
I'd consider listing the following in your lease:

Vet/Farrier requirements (must have X supplement, must have X injection, must have X type of shoes every X weeks with X Farrier, any additional vet work responsibility of lessee and on approval of owner ONLY)
Showing: # of shows allowed per month, etc. Or on approval of owner first, etc.


I had a similar lease written up for a client a year ago. They wanted to sell the horse, but since it was older it was a hard sell, despite the fact that it was still WINNING everything. Everyone wanted to lease. We ended up finding someone who wanted to do a lease purchase. The lease was written up VERY specifically - required certain supplements, specific shoeing, jump height resrtrictions (it was THE BEST 2'6", but you could easily scare it at the 3'), specific boots (type not brand) for turnout, and the list went on. There was nothing in the lease that should have been a problem for a Short Stirrup level rider (the lessee).

Evidently, according to the lessees trainer, the people (first timers) were so worried about the details of my multi page lease that they decided to buy right up front!

However, my job, as I saw it, was to ensure the best interest of the horse and my client. If the lessee decided not to purchase at the end of the lease, we needed to do everything we could to ensure that the horse came back in the wonderful mental and physical state in which we sent it off. Hence the requirements made it be treated like it was under our care.