PDA

View Full Version : Jumping on a Circle?



Gwendolyn
May. 9, 2009, 08:28 PM
Specifically a single, small (2'-2'3) fence on a 30 meter circle, at the canter.

What are the benefits? Drawbacks?

Of course, as with all excercises, I know to use in moderation. :)

saultgirl
May. 9, 2009, 08:32 PM
It's an easy exercise to keep repeating at the canter while keeping everything else the same. You can just work on establishing and maintaining a good rhythm at the canter and let the jump come to you.

Show_hunters
May. 9, 2009, 08:44 PM
I love this drill and when you add two or three other fences or raised poles I call it "the wheel of death". I agree with with all of the benfits that were listed above and I think it's great way to re-center and focus both horse and rider (i.e. good prep for jumping, or starting a horse and or rider back into a jumping program or if my horse was little nutty :eek: and needed to be dialed back in we would do this drill until he was soft again).

For fun my last trainer would make a tight bounce at one fence.

jetsmom
May. 10, 2009, 02:05 AM
Fantastic for learning to keep a steady rhythm, and for riders that either want to pick or gun before jumps. Also good for horses that like to make a bid for fences. Rather than pulling on the horse a few strides out you can use the circle to stay soft, and let them just settle and learn that they aren't going to be pulled on.

mvp
May. 10, 2009, 06:37 AM
Specifically for the inside hind leg.

I know a BNT who warms up his hunters with one of these, trotting first and then a canter. He believes a long, easy stride comes from the engagement of the inside hind leg, so he puts his horses in a position to get that leg specifically in gear from the beginning of a school or warm up.

It also helps your eye, or at least really gets you to turn your head and look.

It will help your ride an accurate, soft turn figuring out who to get the arc you want with the combo of inside leg and outside rein that works for your horse. For the equitation side of your career (if you go there), it will help you make turns by thinking about leg yielding out to widen the arc, or leg yeilding in to shrink it. So long as you ride your turns this way, you create engagement rather than a horse pulling himself along with his front end as you turn.

Lots of work for the horse. Just use one jump at first. Add a pole on the opposite side of the circle if you want to make it harder and then add more elements as you both get better. The exercise will show you where you need to improve your flatwork. Fill in those holes before jumping more in this exercise and then come back to check your progress.

Jleegriffith
May. 10, 2009, 07:36 AM
Specifically for the inside hind leg.

I know a BNT who warms up his hunters with one of these, trotting first and then a canter. He believes a long, easy stride comes from the engagement of the inside hind leg, so he puts his horses in a position to get that leg specifically in gear from the beginning of a school or warm up.

It also helps your eye, or at least really gets you to turn your head and look.

It will help your ride an accurate, soft turn figuring out who to get the arc you want with the combo of inside leg and outside rein that works for your horse. For the equitation side of your career (if you go there), it will help you make turns by thinking about leg yielding out to widen the arc, or leg yeilding in to shrink it. So long as you ride your turns this way, you create engagement rather than a horse pulling himself along with his front end as you turn.

Lots of work for the horse. Just use one jump at first. Add a pole on the opposite side of the circle if you want to make it harder and then add more elements as you both get better. The exercise will show you where you need to improve your flatwork. Fill in those holes before jumping more in this exercise and then come back to check your progress.

I take all my greenies up to PA for h/j lessons and this is an exercise we warmup with every single time. Finding the inside hind leg, adjusting the canter, letting them find their balance and rhythm and so many more things it does. We just use a single fence on the short side making the circles varying sizes.

watson16
May. 10, 2009, 06:10 PM
My trainer uses this every time before we start doing courses. It really helps the riders learn how and WHY they need to keep their horses balanced, up in front of your leg, and in a rhythm, because if you aren't you will definitely be able to tell. It points out holes in your canter pretty quickly.

Gwendolyn
May. 10, 2009, 06:26 PM
Awesome responses! Thanks!

I've only done it a few times so far, and it's teaching me to focus on the quality of the canter, instead of just riding to a spot, which is a bad habit I have. We crashed through a crossrail the other day because I was picking, but the next time I focused on a steady, forward canter and the jump was much better. ;)

Anymore responses welcome!

Horseymama
May. 10, 2009, 08:08 PM
I love this drill and when you add two or three other fences or raised poles I call it "the wheel of death".

"The Wheel of Death," I love that! I set that exercise up often, it really makes horses learn to balance and carry. But even just one jump on the circle is great, a lot of times I warm up that way before I jump a course.

Its also great to figure eight the jump, concentrating on making a perfect circle and meeting the jump balanced and centered every time.

IsolaBella09
May. 10, 2009, 08:12 PM
The "Circle of Death" is one of my favorites excercises to do. It's great to tune up your eye, let your horse figure out his balance and stride, and great to practice body control and get you thinking ahead. Love it! :D

Aliascml
May. 10, 2009, 09:55 PM
"The Circle of Death" is a very good exercise for rider and horse. It is a nice exercise for the rider to balance their horse. Also, it is good for the rider's eye and is good practice for lengthening and shortening.

superpony123
May. 12, 2009, 03:40 PM
the circle of death is excellent for learning to balance the horse up, balance yourself up, position, and working on strides (so you might do 4 strides in between each, then lengthen and do 3 strides in between each, or your trainer might mix it up, 3,4, 3, 4, or 3,3,4,4, etc.)

smm20
May. 12, 2009, 06:08 PM
This is great for riders who tend to psyche themselves out about jumping. I am the type of rider who tends to over-concentrate on things to the point where I do them incorrectly. For example, if I focus on picking up the correct lead, I will pick up the incorrect lead. But if I need to pick up a canter and then go over a jump, I think mostly about the jump and pick up the correct canter lead. Jumping on a circle or in any type of pattern takes my focus off the jump and on to the figure and results in a better jump.

Go Fish
May. 12, 2009, 08:17 PM
Good exercise for horses that bulge. Sure cured the fat mare...if they bulge, they fall on their face...:lol:

Go Fish
May. 12, 2009, 08:21 PM
I also think I was told by a clinician that it helps teach the horse to maintain the inside (proper) lead over jumps.

Brooke
May. 13, 2009, 01:39 AM
Could someone please tell me how to set the poles for this exercise? Someone mentioned a 30meter circle. Is that a 30m radius? Are the poles set so the center of the pole is on the circle, or is the inside end of the pole on the circle? Sounds like it would be excellent for both me and dear redheaded TB mare. thanks.

bascher
May. 13, 2009, 07:40 AM
Not only does it help my horse in all the ways mentioned above (bulging, etc) but it sure helps me not to take the turn all in one stride and to make sure I have an even rhythm!

Gwendolyn
May. 13, 2009, 08:37 AM
Brooke - I was specifically talking about ONE jump on a circle (not the circle of death, which is 2-4 jumps on a circle).

Just place one jump in the center of the ring and circle around it. You can trot or canter (canter is more useful), and you can make the circle as big or small as you want (obviously a smaller circle is harder).

Personally, it has helped me NOT focus on a distance, and work on my canter approaching the fence.

Bobblehead
May. 13, 2009, 08:43 AM
I'm actually doing this right now, not exactly what you've described but very close. Four ground poles on a 20-meter circle. It's helping me with fear, helping me with seeing spots, helping my horse with her right lead, and above all helping with rhythm. I'm starting to see strides for the first time. We haven't yet got to the point where the strides are the same for each quarter! When I raised the poles to cavaletti height my position went to hell, so we have a long way to go. But it's really good at combining focus with relaxation, if that makes any sense.

bascher
May. 13, 2009, 09:21 AM
Brooke - I was specifically talking about ONE jump on a circle (not the circle of death, which is 2-4 jumps on a circle).

Just place one jump in the center of the ring and circle around it. You can trot or canter (canter is more useful), and you can make the circle as big or small as you want (obviously a smaller circle is harder).

Personally, it has helped me NOT focus on a distance, and work on my canter approaching the fence.

Ugg yes, not focusing on a distance! I always see it TOO far away and then overthink it on the way there haha. This exercise is definitely good for curing that!

Gwendolyn
May. 13, 2009, 10:15 AM
See my post #8.

I did that ONCE and figured out that the trainer I used to work for was RIGHT when she said "don't worry about your distance, ride your canter." ;)

Especially since Dora is rather short strided, so it forces me to NOT pick at my distance and go FORWARD! haha

bascher
May. 13, 2009, 10:25 AM
See my post #8.

I did that ONCE and figured out that the trainer I used to work for was RIGHT when she said "don't worry about your distance, ride your canter." ;)

Especially since Dora is rather short strided, so it forces me to NOT pick at my distance and go FORWARD! haha

I was completely agreeing with you..if you worry about your rhythm, the distance will be there. :)

phoenix mom
May. 13, 2009, 10:36 AM
We just moved to a new barn last week and my DD did this in her second lesson. She loved it and it seemed to totally rebalance her and the horse. This new trainer goes to the GM clinics and works with BNTs when he is at shows. I love a trainer who admits they don't know everything and continues to learn even though they have a depth of experience themselves.

Gwendolyn
May. 13, 2009, 10:47 AM
I know you were, I was just pointing out an example of where I learned the hard way :D

bascher
May. 13, 2009, 02:44 PM
I know you were, I was just pointing out an example of where I learned the hard way :D

I understand now :)