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View Full Version : "Verbizing" - when H/Jers make nouns into verbs



snaffle635
May. 5, 2009, 06:39 PM
On a recent thread, someone pointed out the propensity for H/J'ers to make nouns into verbs. Thought I'd share a conversation from a recent horse show.

Friend: "Are you classic'ing?"

Me: "No, but I'm equitating."

:-)

Thought you might enjoy. Feel free to share!

Pirateer
May. 5, 2009, 06:40 PM
Don't forget "Trial-ing"

2boys
May. 5, 2009, 06:44 PM
How about "flatting"??:lol:

andy825
May. 5, 2009, 06:45 PM
It goes the other way too, verbs to nouns.
Does he have the step and the jump?

Ambrey
May. 5, 2009, 06:49 PM
How about adjectives into verbs?

"Fitting him up?"

Pirateer
May. 5, 2009, 06:55 PM
Lessoning!

gumshoe
May. 5, 2009, 07:00 PM
Vetting?
Trailering

Pirateer
May. 5, 2009, 07:05 PM
A few years ago I coined the term "Anky-inated".
defined: the hunter adaptation of riding deep :)

Ghazzu
May. 5, 2009, 07:25 PM
Don't forget "ribboning".

hrsgirl07
May. 5, 2009, 07:34 PM
we are famous for these ones at the barn where i ride:

we horse ride/ go horse riding
and we horse show

superpony123
May. 5, 2009, 08:18 PM
oh its so true!

lessoning

equitating for sure

ribboning

booting (like booting my horse, like putting his boots on, haha. not throwing the horse out!)

i know theres tons more, but theyre hard to think of when you try to recall them!

Peggy
May. 5, 2009, 08:23 PM
videoing - or whatever its digital equivalent is

tacking up and untacking (or tacking down as one of our barn moms calls it)

snaffle635
May. 5, 2009, 08:23 PM
we are famous for these ones at the barn where i ride:

we horse ride/ go horse riding
and we horse show


Yes, 'horse show' is definitely a verb!

RockinHorse
May. 5, 2009, 08:24 PM
clinic-ing

Pirateer
May. 5, 2009, 08:28 PM
The really sad thing is that some of these are so commonplace that my first was, "Now what is so wrong with ____?"

Mia412
May. 5, 2009, 09:10 PM
We also have the ability to use verbs in ways confusing to non-riders: ;)

"That line doesn't ride like it walks."

JB
May. 5, 2009, 09:22 PM
The really sad thing is that some of these are so commonplace that my first was, "Now what is so wrong with ____?"

I know, I had to go check Websters on a few of these! :eek:

hiddenlake
May. 5, 2009, 09:41 PM
"colicing"
"bridling" or "haltering"


Or verbs used in other unique ways, like what Mia412 said:

"He's sucking back."

It just conjures up a funny image for me when I think about it. :lol:

make x it x so
May. 5, 2009, 09:59 PM
what about lessoning? i hear that one a lot.

Beethoven
May. 5, 2009, 10:03 PM
What about shoeing? I do not think thats a word.

There are so many others. I just can not think of them as they are normal to me.

saddling?

Peggy
May. 5, 2009, 10:24 PM
What about shoeing? I do not think thats a word.

There are so many others. I just can not think of them as they are normal to me.

saddling?
Shoeing (http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/shoeing) is a word. Perfectly good participle, I guess.

Videoing is not, according to M-W online dictionary linked to above. Somewhat amusingly, the first suggested word was "evildoing."

HARROLDhasmyheart
May. 5, 2009, 10:41 PM
Hacking? Not sure if that is an actual word, but it is definitely part of my vocabulary!

lesson junkie
May. 5, 2009, 11:21 PM
I think it's called a gerund.

Peggy
May. 5, 2009, 11:41 PM
I think it's called a gerund.
I thought a gerund was simply a noun substitute, but it seems as if it's more complex than that so you may well be right :confused: I did manage to figure out that both participles and gerunds are what are called verbals, but the examples I found made my head spin. Guess that's how some people feel about science:lol:.

So, English majors, what word form is "shoeing" in each of the following sentences?

The farrier is shoeing my horse.

My horse is due for shoeing.

DancingQueen
May. 5, 2009, 11:42 PM
I have a good one from last weekend.

New adult rider walks out of the tent and I ask "is he puffed?" She gives me a blank stare and I say "IS HE PUFFED?" as I reach towards one of his ears. He is not puffed so we get some earplugs and continue towards the ring with the other two adults in her division.

As we are walking towards the ring she says "I'm sorry, I didn't know what "puffed meant, I thought it was something medical."
Which of course starts innuendos with the other two. I take the chance and mimik passing a "cigarette" saying "take a puff, take a puff, take a puff, inhale... hold it... now exhale!"
Very inappropriate but they all had a laugh with it and might actually have relaxed some as a result even if there was no real puffing!

All of our show kids of course already knows that "puffed" means that earplugs are in place!

Mtn trails
May. 6, 2009, 03:11 AM
videoing - or whatever its digital equivalent is

tacking up and untacking (or tacking down as one of our barn moms calls it)

I have a friend that calls it "de-tacking" I always get a laugh out of it but they're totally serious. :lol:

_downpour_
May. 6, 2009, 04:30 AM
"colicing"
"bridling" or "haltering"


Or verbs used in other unique ways, like what Mia412 said:

"He's sucking back."

It just conjures up a funny image for me when I think about it. :lol:

I use that all the time! But i don't see what's wrong with it, haha

In an english essay I used the word 'nervy sweat' to describe an exam sitation - such as in horses "The horse got out of the trailer, covered in nervy sweat"... apparantely nervy is not an acceptable word to use in an english essay!

Equino
May. 6, 2009, 06:50 AM
Not verbizig, but Dad would hate it when I'd say,"The fences need fixing." or "Time to fix fence!" Or "We horse show tomorrow."

Definitely part of daily vocabulary-lessoning, equitating, ribboning, "Are you horse showing this weekend?". Our new term-"Make sure Brianne Goual to that jump." (I have a BAD tendency to drop my upper body in the air)

And then there are PLENTY horse lingo that your everyday Jane won't get-"Climb behind him as you get closer to that jump!" "Sit him down!"

2boys
May. 6, 2009, 07:12 AM
I have a good one from last weekend.

New adult rider walks out of the tent and I ask "is he puffed?" She gives me a blank stare and I say "IS HE PUFFED?" as I reach towards one of his ears. He is not puffed so we get some earplugs and continue towards the ring with the other two adults in her division.

As we are walking towards the ring she says "I'm sorry, I didn't know what "puffed meant, I thought it was something medical."
Which of course starts innuendos with the other two. I take the chance and mimik passing a "cigarette" saying "take a puff, take a puff, take a puff, inhale... hold it... now exhale!"
Very inappropriate but they all had a laugh with it and might actually have relaxed some as a result even if there was no real puffing!

All of our show kids of course already knows that "puffed" means that earplugs are in place!

AAAHHHH, that one took me a while! hehehe

2boys
May. 6, 2009, 07:17 AM
I can't believe no one has said "schooling" yet. That is definitely one that I would never use outside of horsie world, yet it is so common. Such a funny word when you think about it.

Dirty Little Secret
May. 6, 2009, 08:16 AM
SO funny and shockingly true! The teacher side of me is saddened.... I will now work to correct my grammar...

SillyHorse
May. 6, 2009, 08:22 AM
I find the verbification of English distressing and amusing at the same time. But the latest example I read was just distressing: "I would barn at that place." :confused:

Gwendolyn
May. 6, 2009, 08:31 AM
I always laugh to myself when I ask someone if they are "doing" a horse.

As in, are you doing Pandora in the hunters or the eq.?

Doesn't sound quite right. :lol:

Huntrs+eq
May. 6, 2009, 09:07 AM
I find the verbification of English distressing and amusing at the same time.
...Same. I've occasionally used "hunter" as a verb, as in, "Just for kicks, I took my jumper mare in the A/Os and she huntered around like an old pro."

And, to play devil's advocate, I imagine these would fit the bill too-"half-chapping" and "tall-booting," e.g. "Are you half-chapping or tall-booting today?" "Definitely half-chapping-all this rain has turned everything into a mudpit. There's no way I'm going to tall-boot today."

As for shoeing, bridling, saddling, tacking, hacking, and schooling, I'm pretty sure those are legit words.

ExJumper
May. 6, 2009, 09:19 AM
I have a good one from last weekend.

New adult rider walks out of the tent and I ask "is he puffed?" She gives me a blank stare and I say "IS HE PUFFED?" as I reach towards one of his ears. He is not puffed so we get some earplugs and continue towards the ring with the other two adults in her division.

As we are walking towards the ring she says "I'm sorry, I didn't know what "puffed meant, I thought it was something medical."
Which of course starts innuendos with the other two. I take the chance and mimik passing a "cigarette" saying "take a puff, take a puff, take a puff, inhale... hold it... now exhale!"
Very inappropriate but they all had a laugh with it and might actually have relaxed some as a result even if there was no real puffing!

All of our show kids of course already knows that "puffed" means that earplugs are in place!

We use the phrase "having his ears in."

As in, "it's raining and pretty loud in the arena -- make sure you put his ears in."

Or, "he's still acting a little nervous -- are you sure his ears are in?"

Confused the hell out of the Western people at the boarding barn when we had our lesson.

Janet
May. 6, 2009, 09:44 AM
Some of the dressage usage is even weirder.

"His mediums weren't really through"
made perfect sense to us, but the non-horse person with us thought we were talking about an unsuccessful attempt at communicating with the dead.

scheibyee
May. 6, 2009, 09:58 AM
I verbify everything... it's very sad but everyone at our barn does it. I actually love it. For instance, when I want to know if my friend is coming to the barn today, I ask "Are you barning today?". It just hit me how badly I do it. "Are you draw reining today?" "Are you pelhaming today". Hm... all those years of grammar gone to waste.

RockinHorse
May. 6, 2009, 10:04 AM
I can't believe no one has said "schooling" yet. That is definitely one that I would never use outside of horsie world, yet it is so common. Such a funny word when you think about it.

Actually, I believe "schooling" as well as "schooled" are pretty common.

Fixerupper
May. 6, 2009, 10:14 AM
Some of the dressage usage is even weirder.

"His mediums weren't really through"
made perfect sense to us, but the non-horse person with us thought we were talking about an unsuccessful attempt at communicating with the dead.

:lol::lol::lol:

and.... his lengthens were downhill and his changes were late behind

SillyHorse
May. 6, 2009, 01:04 PM
"His mediums weren't really through"


:lol::lol::lol:

and.... his lengthens were downhill and his changes were late behind
Sounds like that one needs to go down the road. :lol:

2boys
May. 6, 2009, 01:17 PM
Actually, I believe "schooling" as well as "schooled" are pretty common.

Yes, that is what I meant. Very common, but only in the horse world.

RomeosGirl
May. 6, 2009, 02:35 PM
I made up my own new one today...
"Un-two pointed"
We were going through a gymnastic & my trainer wanted us to get in two point over the pole, stay there through the grid & then come back to a normal position & halt...
Well one time through I just stayed up in my two point (I thought). Trainer said that was good - I said "yeah, but I never un-two pointed":D

I love the "puffed" verb - we used to call them their "brains". Does Phil have his brains??? It's kinda windy today.

Couture TB
May. 6, 2009, 02:46 PM
Did you rug the horse's?
Fitting out the horses (ie cleaning, trimming etc got that one from the track people)

Tons more but due to lovely pain killers my brain has blanked:lol:

Janet
May. 6, 2009, 02:51 PM
Yes, that is what I meant. Very common, but only in the horse world.
Pretty common outside the horse world too.
Just google "well schooled", "schooled" or "schooling"

twobays
May. 6, 2009, 04:12 PM
I love the "puffed" verb - we used to call them their "brains". Does Phil have his brains??? It's kinda windy today.

Hubby refers to the horses having their feet done as "getting new feet." As in, "Is Dobbin getting new feet today?" I swear he's a smart guy...:D

BlueBobRadar
May. 6, 2009, 04:53 PM
:lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol:This is SO true!!! I use all of these... oh how my english teacher would kill me:winkgrin: My favorite is that a few of us at my barn call our horses "ponies." There is only one actual pony in the barn. "How was your pony today?" "Do the ponies need blankies?" "Did the ponies go out this morning?" Kinda off topic, but still... But it was really funny last weekend when a girl I've shown against since we were on ponies asked what happened to my pony. This was the first time I'd shown against her with my new horse. Thinking she ment the HORSE I've ridden the past few years I go "Oh hes great, I sold him-" but my mom interupted and told her where my PONY had gone. oops on my part!:winkgrin: I completely failed to realize that when she said "pony" she ment the actual 14.2 and under pony that I had had.:)

Back on topic- yes, all horse people I've known use these terms and I've never questioned them! It's normal to us...:)

anchorsaway
May. 6, 2009, 05:07 PM
I think my favorite is the use of "picking out his/her hooves or feet" outside of the barn. My, what strange looks one receives! :lol:
More than once I have been asked if the horse is going to have new feet or something along those lines.

As for the gerunds and participles-
Gerunds basically end in -ing and can be modified using direct object or making the gerund the subject of the sentence.
Participles all depend on where they are used. So in present participle, they are often used in conjunction with a gerund. When they are past participles, they are used with the preterite or past tense of a verb.

So:
technically in the sentence The farrier is shoeing my horse, shoeing is a gerund as it's the subject of the sentence.

When using participles, My horse is due for a shoeing, shoeing is a present participle.

I know they both seem like gerunds but that's because present participles and gerunds are often interchangable/used in the same way lending to the use of gerund-participle. Confusing, huh?

Tini Sea Soldier
May. 6, 2009, 05:16 PM
For some reason... we always refer to it as "riding in the hunters" but "showing in the jumpers or eq". Not really sure why we differentiate.. but it always seems like those are the answers when asked what you're doing today...

Peggy
May. 6, 2009, 05:21 PM
And from another thread - to martingale or not?

I think I may just have to give up on the whole gerund/participle thing and rest assured that they both have forms that end in ing and come from verbs.:lol:

anchorsaway
May. 6, 2009, 05:35 PM
And from another thread - to martingale or not?

I think I may just have to give up on the whole gerund/participle thing and rest assured that they both have forms that end in ing and come from verbs.:lol:

:D I'm majoring in Journalism and I have to look up what's what every once in a while. :lol:

BearWithMe
May. 6, 2009, 06:42 PM
well have you ever noticed it with technology?

Today at school i asked my friend if she would "facebook me the link to the website"

or this:
me: "have you seen that old british lady that can sing?"
friend: "no i haven't"
me: "youtube it!"

and im pretty sure that "to text" isn't actually a verb

_downpour_
May. 7, 2009, 04:30 AM
^^

and to add to that, 'google it'!!

Jaideux
May. 7, 2009, 04:45 AM
It's not uncommon to hear such things around my barn as, "when you're done haying, can you do turn in before I start graining?"

It's not just horses, though. When I'm riding in an ambulance, peers at other companies will ask me "which one of you is medic-ing today?", as in, being the primary medic providing care.

copper1
May. 7, 2009, 07:02 AM
How about "roading" foxhounds?
You realize we speak a foreign language to those around us that aren't horsey? Do you ever reflect on a converstation you had with a peer and chuckle when you realize how odd it must sound to anyone else?

Quartergirl
May. 7, 2009, 08:57 AM
We use the phrase "having his ears in."

As in, "it's raining and pretty loud in the arena -- make sure you put his ears in."

Or, "he's still acting a little nervous -- are you sure his ears are in?"

Confused the hell out of the Western people at the boarding barn when we had our lesson.

We say, "does he have his brains in" for earplugs. The lady behind me in line at the gas station was very confounded as she overheard me say to my husband.

"He didn't have his brains in and then I ate the out of the line coming home".

hollyhorse2000
May. 7, 2009, 08:58 AM
Not quite the same but . . .

Me: My horse is well broke

Non-horsey person: Oh, I'm so sorry. Can you fix it?

Fixerupper
May. 7, 2009, 09:08 AM
Years back I worked at the racetrack for a while before returning to the show horse game, the words used are quite different...
I got very funny looks when I asked the other grooms 'so..do we wrap them every day?' I said wrap (banadage) they heard rap... :eek:

BananasInPajamas
May. 7, 2009, 01:15 PM
I know someone who used to say "Your horse is coursing so well" like he made it around the course nicely.

jumpingmaya
May. 7, 2009, 01:35 PM
HAHA... some of these are wonderful!
How about (little off subject but horse people will understand... :yes::yes:)
At the gas station, in line to pay for my drink... I was on my cell with a friend, talking about a sale horse that I was riding who was having some feet issues... "Yeah, the vet's coming out tomorrow... they're going to do full lameness test and x-ray and or ultrasound whatever needs to be done... Yeah I know it's sad... he's only 6. Bute? Yeah, he's on bute... I just wouldn't be suprised if he already has ulcers the poor guy so bute isn't really the best thing for him anyways... Well and if he is "broken", I don't know what they are going to do with him... yea, I'm sure the owner will want to inject before giving up...". A big biker guy was in front of me, paid for whatever he was buying, turned around put his hand on my shoulder and was like.. "Don't worry hunny... it's going to work out..." :eek:
My friend about died laughing on the other end... and that's when I was once again reminded that we are our own breed of people :yes:

kellyb
May. 7, 2009, 02:30 PM
^^

and to add to that, 'google it'!!

Oh, the look on my face when I asked my 55 yr old dad about something and that was his reply!! :lol:

Iride
May. 7, 2009, 02:44 PM
How about vet/medical related things. Such as: "This horse has a knee." No kidding!

superpony123
May. 7, 2009, 02:53 PM
I always laugh to myself when I ask someone if they are "doing" a horse.

As in, are you doing Pandora in the hunters or the eq.?

Doesn't sound quite right. :lol:

HAHAHA! yes. in school i'll be with one of my horsey friends (among mostly non horse students, of course) and we'll be talking about a show or something, and it'll come out like "yeah, sebastian (trainer) did anna (the horse) at so and so place" and we'll get all these weird looks :lol:

Iride
May. 7, 2009, 03:02 PM
Then there's always the much appreciated cell phone conversation (heard in non-horsey public) about cleaning Joe's sheath.... plus how awful it smelled, et al :lol:

3 is the limit
May. 7, 2009, 03:34 PM
During a jumping lesson, my trainer told me that "I was riding backwards to the jump". My husband (who is a non-horsey person) in a very confused and hushed tone came up to me after the lesson and said "honey, something is not quite right with your trainer today...she thought you were riding the horse facing his behind."

BAWHAHAHA:winkgrin:

Gray Horse H/J
May. 7, 2009, 11:21 PM
Hubby refers to the horses having their feet done as "getting new feet." As in, "Is Dobbin getting new feet today?" I swear he's a smart guy...:D

I say that, too! I always have. :lol:

I've never heard "puffed" for having ear puffies in, but I like that. If I ever need to ear puffy a horse again I may use that. I used to call it "putting their ears in".

And see...I just verbized. Ear puffying a horse.

I like the use of "do" in terms of riding, shoeing, etc. "Did the shoer do my horse yet?" Non-horse people give you quite the look if they hear you talk about doing the horse, especially when the horse has a human name. "I have to do Sam." Hehe. :D

Peggy
May. 8, 2009, 01:10 AM
I was talking to some of the dressage riders at the barn and mentioned that I had jumped the gate. One of them got a really funny look on her face and questioned "you mean out of the arena?" No, not the 5' gate to the ring, but the tiny little plastic gate jump. The same dressage rider decided to come and play in a few jumping lessons. Trainer asked her to trot in and canter out of a line. She trotted over the first jump, continued at the canter, and cantered neatly past the second jump. Different lingo.

Rio Blanco
May. 8, 2009, 02:05 AM
Ponying?? I told my (non-horsey) mother that I was going to have a friend start ponying my filly and she got this really weird look on her face and had no idea what I was talking about.

Chipping

Vetting

Or just the weird way some of us say things: my IHSA coach's favorite phrase "(horse's name) needs ridden."

suze
May. 8, 2009, 10:05 AM
"Flatting" always makes me think of "flatulence"

meupatdoes
May. 8, 2009, 11:36 AM
My favorite verbified hunter word is "Germanizing" -used for a overiding a horse with the seat, leg and hand.

Additionally, if everyone will indulge me setting the grammar record straight...



As for the gerunds and participles-
Gerunds basically end in -ing and can be modified using direct object or making the gerund the subject of the sentence.
Participles all depend on where they are used. So in present participle, they are often used in conjunction with a gerund. When they are past participles, they are used with the preterite or past tense of a verb.

So:
technically in the sentence The farrier is shoeing my horse, shoeing is a gerund as it's the subject of the sentence.

When using participles, My horse is due for a shoeing, shoeing is a present participle.


Well, no.


In the sentence, "The farrier is shoeing my horse," the farrier is the subject, as he is doing the action.
"Is shoeing" is the compound verb with is the helping verb and shoeing the main verb.
Similarly, if the farrier "should have been shoeing" a different horse, all of that is the verb.

As for the gerund/participle distinction:
Gerunds are verbs used as nouns, while participles are verbs used as adjectives.
In the sentence, "Swimming is fun," swimming is a gerund that is the subject of the sentence.
Similarly, in the sentence, "My horse is due for a shoeing", 'shoeing' is the gerund, acting as a noun that is the object of the preposition 'for'.

In the sentence, "The spooking horse darted to the left," spooking is a participle that modifies horse.



A decade of Latin will do it to ya.

TheOrangeOne
May. 8, 2009, 12:17 PM
Gerund/Gerundive.

HAH. :lol:

I didn't have a decade, but still the words bring back unpleasant memories.

anchorsaway
May. 8, 2009, 05:40 PM
My favorite verbified hunter word is "Germanizing" -used for a overiding a horse with the seat, leg and hand.

Additionally, if everyone will indulge me setting the grammar record straight...



Well, no.


In the sentence, "The farrier is shoeing my horse," the farrier is the subject, as he is doing the action.
"Is shoeing" is the compound verb with is the helping verb and shoeing the main verb.
Similarly, if the farrier "should have been shoeing" a different horse, all of that is the verb.

As for the gerund/participle distinction:
Gerunds are verbs used as nouns, while participles are verbs used as adjectives.
In the sentence, "Swimming is fun," swimming is a gerund that is the subject of the sentence.
Similarly, in the sentence, "My horse is due for a shoeing", 'shoeing' is the gerund, acting as a noun that is the object of the preposition 'for'.

In the sentence, "The spooking horse darted to the left," spooking is a participle that modifies horse.



A decade of Latin will do it to ya.

:) Thanks.
Stupid public schools! haha

Pirateer
May. 8, 2009, 06:09 PM
How about vet/medical related things. Such as: "This horse has a knee." No kidding!

Canter horses are NOTORIOUS for this! JimBob has a knee! Ankle! Assorted other joint!

Quin
May. 8, 2009, 09:41 PM
Not verbizig, but Dad would hate it when I'd say,"The fences need fixing."


Oh, I could live with that version. The problem it that it has morphed again and become "The fence needs fixed". Um, hello? Did you drop a few words there? "The fence needs to be fixed"? The "to be" has become silent, I guess.

Couture TB
May. 8, 2009, 09:55 PM
'racing jewelry' when talking about horses with not really clean legs that raced

'racing ankles'

Jaideux
May. 9, 2009, 03:27 AM
Oh, I could live with that version. The problem it that it has morphed again and become "The fence needs fixed". Um, hello? Did you drop a few words there? "The fence needs to be fixed"? The "to be" has become silent, I guess.

I swear, it's a genetic or regional thing! My ex-bf, from Ohio, used to omit those useful words all the time without ever realizing it. His mom did it, too!

Moxie
May. 9, 2009, 06:00 AM
It's not even always verbs -- I knew a girl at school here who would tack on a 'many' and a plural ending to an adjective when describing horse things, defying all grammatical laws. But... it was kind of CATCHY. I mean, she had pretty much everyone at the barn saying this. So sometimes I will be sitting there, watching a nice looking horse go by, and THIS travesty will pop out of my mouth:

'Wow, he is MANY pretties.'

Everyone at home just sort of looks at me, mouth agape, and says, 'Aren't you graduating this year? With an ENGLISH degree?'

Possibly we horse people are just rebels who cannot be constrained by the English language.

Iride
May. 16, 2009, 12:13 PM
"He was 4 beating."

Sing Mia Song
May. 16, 2009, 02:29 PM
my IHSA coach's favorite phrase "(horse's name) needs ridden."


"The fence needs fixed".


Grrrr, how I hate that! I belong to my local Freecycle and there is one woman who always posts (speaking of nouns made into verbs...) her offerings and adds "needs cleaned," as in "baby cradle, needs cleaned." Always makes me wonder--I didn't realize that baby cradles had needs, nor that their needs could be cleaned. ;)

rydrzup
May. 19, 2009, 07:25 PM
I do the three foot; he jumps 4 foot...(never feet !)

(We sound moronic Im sure to non riders)

"I do..." is a good one...she does the adults. A non rider type asks if you horse race if they see you in TS and you say no, I do the hunters.

Rock back...ride the gap...cracked his back over the oxer....huge step....ride the pull....

not the same concept but weird enough....whats worse....it is so normal its hard to think up nouns-verbs. Im guilty of adopting ..."Im horseshowing"....did he get his turnout? This thread cracked me up

caradino
May. 20, 2009, 09:11 AM
Grrrr, how I hate that! I belong to my local Freecycle and there is one woman who always posts (speaking of nouns made into verbs...) her offerings and adds "needs cleaned," as in "baby cradle, needs cleaned." Always makes me wonder--I didn't realize that baby cradles had needs, nor that their needs could be cleaned. ;)

is this a regional thing!?

i'm a born-and-bred jersey girl, but when i went off to college in PA i ran into TONS of people who just loved to eliminate "to be" from sentences. such as:

"my laundry needs done"

"my tack needs cleaned"

ARUGHH! drives me nuts!

bumknees
May. 20, 2009, 10:59 AM
is this a regional thing!?

i'm a born-and-bred jersey girl, but when i went off to college in PA i ran into TONS of people who just loved to eliminate "to be" from sentences. such as:

"my laundry needs done"

"my tack needs cleaned"

ARUGHH! drives me nuts!

mmmm <raises hand> I do this all the time but I was taught when younger dont add words to what you are saying if you can say it in 4 words dont do it in 8... but then agian we tend to go pert near also...

Janet
May. 20, 2009, 11:06 AM
is this a regional thing!?

i'm a born-and-bred jersey girl, but when i went off to college in PA i ran into TONS of people who just loved to eliminate "to be" from sentences. such as:

"my laundry needs done"

"my tack needs cleaned"

ARUGHH! drives me nuts!
It MAY be a "Pennsylvania Dutch" influence.