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View Full Version : Could I show her - critique ?



KateWooten
Apr. 27, 2009, 11:41 PM
I know I asked about this 13hh pony a year or so ago ... do you think she has any potential as a local hunter pony ? What do I need to do in order to show her ? Apologies for the dumb questions, it's just that I'm a bit foreign, and we don't have 'hunters' in England :o - we have hunting and working hunter as a show class, but not this style-jumping hunter thing, so although I've been and watched it a bunch of times, I'm afraid I still have no real clue what I'm looking at ! I've jumped her, but only ever to get over the jump, if you see what I mean.

Please forgive the rider - she's a 40+ yr old beginner (yes, it's me) ... but what about the pony ? Can you even tell anything from a photo ? I read that George Morris column in Practical Horseman and he seems to be able to see a whole lot in a photo (like, ferinstance, my lack of braids and my lower leg :eek: ) but you'd need to look at the balance of the horse, wouldn't you ? and its action ? and lead changes and all ?

Anyway, here she is, just jumping :
http://i46.photobucket.com/albums/f135/joePony/TinyPony/RiverGlen%20Apr09/1rght0409__TOM1749.jpg

HARROLDhasmyheart
Apr. 28, 2009, 12:24 AM
You can show any horse. You just can't win on any horse.

You could certainly show your pony--though from the looks of that picture, you might have more luck in the jumpers. I know that a picture can't accurately represent or describe a horses jumping ability overall, but it can serve as a good indicator. Your pony obviously can jump just fine, though it is not as square as seen in the winning hunters. This could be worked on over time with exercises such as grids and bounces, or just with more experience.

Do you have your heart set on the hunters? The A-circuit seems to look for a particular style of jump, and only that style whereas the jumpers are a little more relaxed insofar as the form of the horse essentially won't score you any lower (unless they drag their hind end, as an example, and knock down all the rails).

The local shows are not quite as competitive as the A circuit, though there are still nice ponies and horses out there. I'm sure you'd be fine, and I doubt you'd be laughed out of the ring or anything of that sort, it's just hard to tell how you would place.

eponacowgirl
Apr. 28, 2009, 12:40 AM
Do you have your heart set on the hunters?

Yeah right. Try to drag her away from XC!

HARROLDhasmyheart
Apr. 28, 2009, 12:56 AM
Yeah right. Try to drag her away from XC!

Well, she asked about potential as a local hunter :)

fourmares
Apr. 28, 2009, 01:36 AM
Without knowing how competitive your local show circuit is I can not say how competitive you might be... but, your pony is cute, she has a pretty face and and is good with her knees. I imagine if you let go of her face she might use her head and neck a whole lot better than she is doing in this picture. For the ideal hunter picture she needs to stretch down and forward with her neck and round her back a little more.

For the local hunters (in most places) if she can keep a rhythm, and meet all 8 fences at something close to a good spot she ought to do o.k. For you, switch the breeches to tan or khaki, get some black gloves and a rat catcher instead of the stock tie and you're good too. (pony would go in a fitted fuzzy saddle pad instead of the square pad)

KateWooten
Apr. 28, 2009, 08:04 AM
ok, what does this mean ...
though it is not as square as seen in the winning hunters.

Like I say - it's a beginner rider. It's not that I have my heart set on anything, I just wonder how she would do, and where do I go from here. I guess you need a trainer to go with you even at a local show ?

Acertainsmile
Apr. 28, 2009, 08:36 AM
Cute pony!

You might want to look at your local show rules, usually pony hunters are to be shown by jr. riders.

Janet
Apr. 28, 2009, 08:57 AM
The "not quite square" refers to the fact that her front feet and maybe her knees too) are not quite even/symetrical. Ideally, they would also like her hooves closer to her elbows (tighter fold).

Having seen the pony go, I'd also say that she would need at a considerably slower pace (than that show jumping course) for the hunters.

I assume you already know that you would have to find a junior to rider her. At USEF shows, and at most unrecognized shows, only juniors can ride in pony hunter classes.

Of course, (at both recognized and unrecognized shows) there are hunter classes at "pony heights" with no restrictions on the horse's height or the rider's age. But then you would be competing against horses, and the course would be set at "horse" distances. She can handle the horse distances when going at a "show jumping" pace, ( I think she put 2 strides in the 2 stride in and out) but the question would be whether she could make the horse distances going at a "show hunter" pace.

Yes, definitely work with a hunter trainer so you know what they are looking for. So much of show hunters is based on unwritten rules that "everbody" knows. But if you haven't done it, you don't know the unwritten rules.

I say go for it.

findeight
Apr. 28, 2009, 09:03 AM
Are you contemplating a move stateside or staying "over there"?

Not all of them can do it and, unless you want to putt putt around a smaller sand ring and look pretty, she looks like a nice type to go ride and enjoy.

zahena
Apr. 28, 2009, 09:42 AM
I'm in agreement with fourmares. It really depends on what your local circuit is like. Go watch a show and see what your competition looks like. And just because you ride a pony, doesn't mean that you HAVE to compete in pony hunters. You could compete in any division that fits your horse is pony hunters are for juniors only.

Also some circuits offer pony jumpers and that might be more fun for you as well. I am planning on doing some rotations with my showteam between hunters and jumpers. Jumpers really levels the playing field because its only about you, your pony, faults and time.

If you just want to go bang around a course and have a good time, then go for it. If your heart is set on winning some ribbons then put in some time watching shows and get a nice hunter trainer. Your pony seems cute and willing.

My vote is to go and have fun!!

Janet
Apr. 28, 2009, 10:02 AM
Are you contemplating a move stateside or staying "over there"?

Not all of them can do it and, unless you want to putt putt around a smaller sand ring and look pretty, she looks like a nice type to go ride and enjoy.
She is already "stateside". Picture was taken at a Horse Trial in Tennessee. Not sure how she placed, but "Pony" was a star.

Tini Sea Soldier
Apr. 28, 2009, 10:47 AM
Pony is cute... like the coloring.

If you're a beginner... and pony is a good teacher, than maybe you'd want to start in the equitation classes. That will give you a feel for what it will be like to ride in a hunter division, however the focus will be on your riding style and ability to control your mount.

I think you could make up a nice team in a beginner/maiden equitation up through pre-adult/modified adult equitation. You can also cross enter in beginner hunters (if u do beginner eq) or modified adult hunters.

As you get the higher eq and hunter divisions... it will become more challenging to ride a pony and place... as many judges will want you to do the horse strides... but in the lower levels, it is completely warranted and acceptable.

The day they add an Adult Amateur- Pony Division... is the day I do a little dance!

Dune
Apr. 28, 2009, 12:10 PM
The day they add an Adult Amateur- Pony Division... is the day I do a little dance!


You and me both.:D

lonewolf
Apr. 28, 2009, 12:29 PM
Your pony is very cute and looks athletic.

In that picture, she isn't really jumping in top 'hunter' style. A top ribbon-winning hunter would bring her knees up a little higher (the forearm should be at least parallel to the ground or, preferably, higher), and would stretch her head forward and down a little more so as to give a rounder jump.

I think that if you could practice riding her a bit more like a hunter that she would do just fine at local shows. Especially if she can canter around a course on an even rhythm and swap her leads cleanly when desired.

Now for classes. Pony classes are only for junior riders. So, for you to show her, you will have to go in open classes. The strides will be set for horses, but at a lot of local shows they will let a pony add a step and still pin. If you are an amateur, you can also show in any adult amateur classes.

She looks like a really nice pony who is lots of fun to ride. Good luck with her!

Limone
Apr. 29, 2009, 12:07 AM
The day they add an Adult Amateur- Pony Division... is the day I do a little dance!


You and me both.:D

actually it is legal for an adult to show a pony in the adult amateur hunters

http://www.usef.org/documents/ruleBook/2009/15-HU.pdf

"HU108 1c Ponies may be ridden by adults"


i have actually seen it done... not often but at a few big east coast shows i have seen then but it all is up to the judge on how they place... (sorry i am procrastinating studying so had to step in!)

your pony is very cute! on a local circuit i am sure she could be very competitive in the 2'6'' levels and possibly higher if you want to do the hunters think about releasing a little more almost looping the reins i think she will jump much better that way

heartinrye
Apr. 29, 2009, 12:20 AM
I'm in agreement with fourmares. It really depends on what your local circuit is like. Go watch a show and see what your competition looks like. And just because you ride a pony, doesn't mean that you HAVE to compete in pony hunters. You could compete in any division that fits your horse is pony hunters are for juniors only.

Also some circuits offer pony jumpers and that might be more fun for you as well. I am planning on doing some rotations with my showteam between hunters and jumpers. Jumpers really levels the playing field because its only about you, your pony, faults and time.

If you just want to go bang around a course and have a good time, then go for it. If your heart is set on winning some ribbons then put in some time watching shows and get a nice hunter trainer. Your pony seems cute and willing.

My vote is to go and have fun!!

As the rider is over 18, she may not compete in Pony Jumpers, but she can compete her pony IN the jumpers :)

Dune
Apr. 29, 2009, 11:29 AM
actually it is legal for an adult to show a pony in the adult amateur hunters

http://www.usef.org/documents/ruleBook/2009/15-HU.pdf

"HU108 1c Ponies may be ridden by adults"



We know that, we were just hoping for another division. ;) OP, btw, love the pony. I'm loathe to suggest that you start riding her "like a hunter" as it looks like you're doing just fine right now. :)

GGsuperpony
Apr. 29, 2009, 12:05 PM
On my local circuit the pony hunters are divided by height - 2' or 2'6 - and are open to juniors and adults. So you might actually want to check with yours... You might be able to show against other ponies if you'd like!

KateWooten
May. 20, 2009, 05:43 PM
Ok, thanks guys :) Yes, I am English, but I live on this side of the pond ... Pic was taken in TN at an event. Janet's right on the mark as usual - the big thing to work on would have to be slowing her down to a steady rhythm, and me not getting grabby at her face. We've made a lot of progress on that on the flat since RG, but I think we've a way to go over fences. We're a little gallollopy atm.

I am looking for a junior rider for her. The reason I'm interested in this whole thing is that for the summer, our local shows in Tennessee are all 'hunter' shows. Every now and then one of them will run a jumper class as an add on, sometime at the end of a long day, but you can never guarantee there will be anyone in it :( Apart from that - no variety at all - no local jumping, no handy pony, no gymkhana games, no gambler's or pick-a-fence, none of the fun stuff at all, just da-dum-da-dum-da-dum huntering :(

So ... in order to secure her future, I need to think about getting her to do this stuff - with a child rider. (You can tell, my heart's not really in it, can't you - not that I have anything against the real skill of getting that jumping round absolutely perfect - I think that's a fantastic thing - it's all the other stuff, the clothes, judging the horse's movement, never being able to get to the ingate, waiting five hours with nobody able to tell you when / if a class will run etc that I can't be bothered with).

Hunter Mom
May. 20, 2009, 05:50 PM
You will have to check out the level of competition at your local shows. At a lot, getting around without any major mishaps is a good start. Also, check your local association's rules regarding ponies and adults - in many it is fine. Others, not so much, but there would likely be other divisions.

OP - is she a "real" pony? Or just a very small horse?

Nes
May. 20, 2009, 06:51 PM
How cute is this little pony!!

I have to agree she's not really tucking 100% but better then some and I still think you could be competative with her at lower levels :)

Best of luck!

LegalEagle
May. 20, 2009, 11:25 PM
If the pony can keep a consistent moderate pace, pick consistent spots, and get her changes, you will pin pretty well at the local shows around TN. She sure is cute!

RugBug
May. 21, 2009, 12:22 AM
Ideally, they would also like her hooves closer to her elbows (tighter fold).


Actually...no. You would not want to see hooves closer to elbows for hunters. You do not want the tightly closed knee. We want the boxy front end. Like this:

http://pets.webshots.com/photo/1282221823066182959XRwigc

If you have a problem with too much pace, your cute pony might naturally jump rounder once you slow down.

Even so, just show if you want to. It's about having fun, right?

Janet
May. 21, 2009, 10:54 AM
I don't know that it is so much a "problem" with that pace, as that, in eventing, they don't change the distances, or the speed for calculating the time allowed, for ponies. So it WAS an appropriate pace for THAT context, just faster than desired for a hunter round.