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HorseGalloper
Apr. 6, 2009, 03:42 PM
I would like to attend school in NYC, but am weighing in the factor of not being able to ride as often if at all. Has anyone managed this and if so, how? I probably won't have my car with me, so I would have to rely on public transportation. Is it even possible to ride without having a car to drive out of the city to barns?

Thanks!

InWhyCee Redux
Apr. 6, 2009, 04:44 PM
Yes, it can be done; I have been doing it for years. But, plan on spending up to an hour on the train (NJ Transit, Long Island RR, or Metro North) or NJ Transit Bus, and more on car fare from the station to the barn. (The only barns I know of within walking distance of a station are Knoll in Long Island and Bergen Equestrian in NJ, and Bergen is closing for renovations next month.)

Search "New York City" and you'll find a number of threads on this incredibly frustrating topic....

BAC
Apr. 6, 2009, 04:46 PM
I can't imagine wanting to leave northern VA for NYC. :confused:

cranky
Apr. 6, 2009, 04:47 PM
You might also consider money. NYC is hugely expensive and I would gather that most riding options within commuting distance are going to be pretty pricey in general (plus the cost of transportation). I lived in NYC and just gave up riding for 20 years. I was lucky enough to be able to pay my electric bill, to be honest, horses in any form were just not in the budget for me.

InWhyCee Redux
Apr. 6, 2009, 04:52 PM
Of course, is you plan on attending NYU or Columbia, they have riding teams and, I would assume, a carpool -- Columbia rides at Garrett in NJ and NYU at Essex in NJ.

twofatponies
Apr. 6, 2009, 04:55 PM
I tried this myself years ago - the time and money spent getting to and from riding was pathetic! It may seem close by, but takes hours back and forth, and the closest barns tend to be crowded and expensive. And yes, $$$$ for everything adds up into a very pathetic lifestyle per dollar, compared to other places. If you come from some money, or like the poor-starving-student lifestyle, you can have a blast, esp. if your interests are something NY specializes in, like theater, film, fashion, law, banking (!)...

RxCate
Apr. 6, 2009, 05:27 PM
go join the mounted auxiliary police unit. you get to ride great horses and you gain something to put on your resume that is highly respectable at the same time... AND it's FREE!

I did it when I lived in Brooklyn and it was awesome. Kept me in riding shape and gave me a great boost in the job world. People are very impressed when you say you were part of NYPD.

patterson
Apr. 6, 2009, 05:36 PM
I've been looking for the answer to this question for ten years and haven't found it. I now split my time between NYC and D. C. for professional reasons, and there's a huge difference in the horsey scene. There are great trainers in Westchester, near Millbrook and around Gladstone, but the trains run infrequently and suburban cabs are hideously expensive. When I rode near Millbrook I paid $35 EACH WAY in cab fare from Wassaic station,bringing total transportation cost to over $100 each time I rode.

I don't know anyone in the horsey world in New York who doesn't have (a) a car and (b) a whole lot of money, as in super highpaying job, high earning spounse, etc., which would fund said car. Just an observation, but it seems to me that the costs of keeping a car here ( not to mention the riding itself) on top of the expense of just living means that people who ride seriously around NY arent reasonably successful professionals as around D. C., Philadelphia, Houston, etc. --they are usually people with a different level of resources, and have a different level of access and equestrian opportunities.

There are lots of reasons to go to school in New York, and being a student can make a very expensive city within reach--but not for riding. If anyone knows different, please let me know!:cry:

patterson
Apr. 6, 2009, 05:57 PM
InWhyCee Redux--I was looking for the old thread and couldn't find it. Can anyone help?

OP--If you ride with a trainer in NoVa, maybe that person can connect you with a barn around NYC that will do you a favor and send someone to the train station to pick you up? Or maybe someone here will know of a barn that might do that? I had a trainer for a while who used to come pick me up at the station and work it into my overall lesson fee. It cut the cost of the trip, but it was still almost three hours each way door-to-door to ride. People thought I was flat-out crazy, and I guess I was. Still am, but at least in D. C. I can ride!:D

meupatdoes
Apr. 6, 2009, 06:09 PM
I work in NYC and ride in NJ.

I have a car.

This is affordable, both time and money wise, because I live right across the river in Jersey City in a 2BR apartment that has a parking space included for far less than a studio with no parking would go for in Manhattan.

I also save the 4% Manhattan residence tax.
(Which, btw, I find it hilarious when Manhattan residents complain about the 4% tax hike on income earned above $250,000, when said complainers aren't even making close to $250,000 and they are gladly paying 4% extra in income tax just to spend twice as much on rent in Manhattan because they "want to live in Manhattan".)

I also save spending $8 in tolls and an hour just crossing the river.

buck22
Apr. 6, 2009, 06:24 PM
when I lived in the city (college days) I had a pos car that I just parked on the street (upper west side). Its been many moons since then and I'm sure much has changed.

I rode/boarded in Suffern, NY, Rockland County, there are a bunch of places there, or at least there were, there is also a train station and bus depot in downtown Suffern, and a bus line that runs up rte 202. The place I boarded at has changed names, etc, and is now a h/j barn that has lost its access to trails.... but does have a huge indoor.

and what are your options going over the tappan zee?

also, check out Riverdale/Bronx... NYC area's best kept secret, I had a photographer shoot the small stable that is in Riverdale, they offer ring riding only I think. I'm sure its not cheap, but its horses :D. There used to be a couple of stables in Brooklyn too.

bussing around NJ isn't that bad and there are tons of small operations in bergen county, like Mahwah, etc... or, at least there were last time I checked about 7 years ago... I flew south.:lol:

patterson
Apr. 6, 2009, 06:33 PM
Right, I agree, that's another choice, and if I stay in New York I'll probably move to Westchester or New Jersey for just that reason. If you own a car anyway, the riding becomes an affordable ( sort of) luxury. It's the horse and the car together with the cost of living that pushes everything into the stratosphere. I haven't wanted to leave Manhattan, but maybe it's time. Not a solution to the carless rider in NYC problem, though.

twofatponies
Apr. 6, 2009, 06:40 PM
also, check out Riverdale/Bronx... NYC area's best kept secret, I had a photographer shoot the small stable that is in Riverdale, they offer ring riding only I think. I'm sure its not cheap, but its horses :D. There used to be a couple of stables in Brooklyn too.


I rode at the stables in Brooklyn years ago. Hard to believe you could actually rent a horse and ride in Prospect Park (with a guide, not on your own!). The stables were ancient, small and very, very dusty, with a single dirt paddock for turnout and a small open area inside the stables to serve as an "indoor". If you are desperate, go for it (if they are still there). Kensington was the name of it.

Riverdale is as nice as urban gets - they have several dozen acres of space, so there are multiple turnout paddocks for rotating turnout and several outdoor rings, and one large indoor (normal kind of indoor). They are absolutely packed to the gills but my impression was run competently. You are surrounded by major roads on all sides, so no trail riding or anything. There are both boarders and school horses there. It is technically reachable by bus, but not a quick trip. Not bad by car (1/2 hour from middle of Manhattan, if you avoid rush hour).

Sorry, I join those who burnt out on NYC, and much appreciate having moved elsewhere. Like where you can stretch one arm out without accidentally smacking someone in the head. :D

patterson
Apr. 6, 2009, 07:26 PM
Forgot about Riverdale. That and Twin Lakes in Bronxville are probably your best close-in options, although very crowded and no rideout at either one. Good quality people and instruction at both, I hear, although I don't know either place personally. Both about 40 minutes from midtown.

For the record, I'm not burning out on NYC--I feel like it's burning out on me, and everyone else who loves the city but wants a reasonably comfortable life without spending a fortune. Riding aside, it's a great place to be a student, because you get university housing and a lot of other good stuff that you have to cover for yourself once you graduate. You might just want to back-burner your riding and put school first right now--you have the rest of your life to ride, and you may not get another chance to live in New York for cheap (er.) And yes, I do know how hard that is to say.

Transplant
Apr. 6, 2009, 09:47 PM
There are express bus lines from the east and west side of Manhattan right up to Riverdale ($5) and if I recall the lessons are five dollars cheaper than Twin Lakes. The bus trip from the start of the line usually takes about 45 minutes. Its probably the most comfortable commute. The only disadvantage is that their regular lesson spots are booked up and so you may have to take cancellation spots. Also a mother told me that they don't offer jumping so her daughter also takes lessons at Twin Lakes.

Twin Lakes is good. The train commute to Crestwood is a little annoying though and more expensive than the bus to Riverdale. The train stops at every podunk station in Brooklyn. The cab station is right at the train station but you'll want to get there about 30 minutes before your lesson because they don't always have a cab waiting for you.

Fox Hill out of Hawthorne is the most expensive I've tried but its also the only place I've found where you can rent out horses for trail rides. Its also the only place this spring I've ridden outdoors which is a plus. Its much further north than Twin Lakes but the train ride is only 4-5 minutes longer because it runs express to White Plains. Its actually a pretty comfortable commute. However, between the train, taxi, and lessons, it is by far the most expensive option of the three.

buck22
Apr. 6, 2009, 09:56 PM
oh, what about chelsea piers on the water on the lower east side? or was that just ages ago too? I used to go to school on 23&3 and drove past the piers on my way down the hh, used to watch the frantic horses out in "turnout" a little dirt patch with 6' concrete walls...

IsolaBella09
Apr. 6, 2009, 09:58 PM
There have been a couple threads on this subject, so try the Search option.

Most responses were to go out to Long Island or to take the train (NJ Transit) into New Jersey. If you have a car it makes it a lot easier. I know a handful of people who live/work in NYC and commute to NJ to ride.

joiedevie99
Apr. 6, 2009, 10:06 PM
I've posted suggestions on the last two threads. If you can't find them send me a pm. The place at Chelsea piers has been gone at least 5 years. It became a basketball place and now I believe they tore that down as well.

If you can bring a car, it's doable to street park it in some areas if you don't have to work a full time job (alternate side of the street parking has its tricks). Otherwise, your options are limited (Twin Lakes, Riverdale, Hunter's Run (?) by the Glen Cove train station, Essex, Overpeck when it reopens, Jamaica Bay, etc.).

ivy62
Apr. 6, 2009, 11:13 PM
Living in the City is one thing getting around outside the city is another. I have lived most of my life around NYC, worked for many years in the city and always had a car. If you know someone close to the city even in NJ maybe you could park your car there and just take mass transit and them drive to where you want to go...
There are lots of places either in Westchester, Long Island, New Jersey , Rockland and even Conn...but it is about access....If you do not mind the train Metro North covers most of Westchester and goes to Conn and easy from Grand Central....
I now live outside the city and still have my car and my horses....
Where are you going to school?

superpony123
Apr. 7, 2009, 01:19 PM
try getting an apartment in hoboken or jersey city. a long time ago, these were one of the last places you'd want to live, but now theyre the new up-and-coming neighborhoods, and values are climbing. plus, you can avoid all the tolls and city traffic. to get to school, just hop on the path train, which hoboken and jersey city both have. that way, you can ride somewhere closer in NJ. in my opinion, this is the easiest (not that finding an apartment is easy, but, i mean once its all said and done, riding would be abundantly easier and more affordable if you were living on the NJ side of the river)

Aubreyyy
Apr. 7, 2009, 01:25 PM
I live in Manhattan, and I've spent the last two years figuring out the best way.

Are you 21? Sign up for ZipCar (zipcar.com) or Mint (drivemint.com) and rent a car for like $4-10 an hour. Use that to drive to Jersey. LOTS of great farms out there, tons of good trainers. I currently lease a horse in Farmington, doesn't take me too long to get out there at all!

If not, you are kinda screwed. The barns in New Jersey are not accessable by train easily at all... you need a car to get from the station to the barn and back to the station.

There are two barns in the Bronx. I have never been able to get good info on Riverdale's H/J program. They have a website but its for their afterschool program. I've never been able to get a call back about boarding and lessons either.

The other, Bronx Equestrian, is a lower-level schoolie type place. They do public trail rides and are open to the public, so it's really really busy. Always kids around.

InWhyCee Redux
Apr. 7, 2009, 01:32 PM
I live in Manhattan, and I've spent the last two years figuring out the best way.

Are you 21? Sign up for ZipCar (zipcar.com) or Mint (drivemint.com) and rent a car for like $4-10 an hour. Use that to drive to Jersey. LOTS of great farms out there, tons of good trainers. I currently lease a horse in Farmington, doesn't take me too long to get out there at all!

If not, you are kinda screwed. The barns in New Jersey are not accessable by train easily at all... you need a car to get from the station to the barn and back to the station.

There are two barns in the Bronx. I have never been able to get good info on Riverdale's H/J program. They have a website but its for their afterschool program. I've never been able to get a call back about boarding and lessons either.

The other, Bronx Equestrian, is a lower-level schoolie type place. They do public trail rides and are open to the public, so it's really really busy. Always kids around.

DITTO for ZipCar — two or three riders in a ZipCar is cheaper than any mode of public transportation.

As for Riverdale — last I heard they have no H/J program, unless you're boarder there. And you'll never get them on the phone. ;)

Aubreyyy
Apr. 7, 2009, 01:38 PM
DITTO for ZipCar — two or three riders in a ZipCar is cheaper than any mode of public transportation.

As for Riverdale — last I heard they have no H/J program, unless you're boarder there. And you'll never get them on the phone. ;)

I use Mint and since I commit to spending $50 a month, I rent for $2 an hour during weekdays between 8-5. Works perfectly for me b/c I don't work! So cheap...and they cover gas!

twofatponies
Apr. 7, 2009, 01:54 PM
try getting an apartment in hoboken or jersey city. a long time ago, these were one of the last places you'd want to live, but now theyre the new up-and-coming neighborhoods, and values are climbing. plus, you can avoid all the tolls and city traffic. to get to school, just hop on the path train, which hoboken and jersey city both have. that way, you can ride somewhere closer in NJ. in my opinion, this is the easiest (not that finding an apartment is easy, but, i mean once its all said and done, riding would be abundantly easier and more affordable if you were living on the NJ side of the river)

I have to chuckle, because when I lived in Hoboken in 1992, it was "up and coming" (meaning more yuppies moving in, more cutesy boutiques and restaurants, etc.), but everyone I told said "oh god, not there! it's so bad!". It wasn't "bad" at all (to my mind). At this point it's got to be long past "up and coming" (16 years later!), and just now finally has the reputation of being up and coming??? LOL

True what you said about transport though. It is cheaper than NYC too, and the riverfront park areas are very pleasant.

linquest
Apr. 7, 2009, 02:54 PM
I put together a NYC metro stables directory years ago, and noted which places were accessible by public transpo. Would appreciate it if people could help update it though!

http://sports.groups.yahoo.com/group/urbanequestrian/links
Check out Urban/Suburban Stables

ivy62
Apr. 7, 2009, 02:56 PM
Also, if you choose to live in Bronxville or some of the better parts of Yonkers the train is right there for either travelling into the city or out also having a car would be easier...Lots of access to farms north of there

Mayaty02
Apr. 7, 2009, 03:52 PM
are you going for college? if so, you may just be better off riding all summer and on breaks at home, as opposed to trying to fit it in during school in the city. If I were going to college in NYC, i think riding would be the last thing on my mind :cool:

InWhyCee Redux
Apr. 7, 2009, 04:09 PM
are you going for college? if so, you may just be better off riding all summer and on breaks at home, as opposed to trying to fit it in during school in the city. If I were going to college in NYC, i think riding would be the last thing on my mind :cool:
_________

Nooooo, college kids have it made -- your class schedule may allow you to ride in the mornings or afternoons, when the area barns actually have space. And if your school has a riding team, you're practically guaranteed a space and people to carpool with. If only I didn't have to work.... ;)

superpony123
Apr. 7, 2009, 05:02 PM
I have to chuckle, because when I lived in Hoboken in 1992, it was "up and coming" (meaning more yuppies moving in, more cutesy boutiques and restaurants, etc.), but everyone I told said "oh god, not there! it's so bad!". It wasn't "bad" at all (to my mind). At this point it's got to be long past "up and coming" (16 years later!), and just now finally has the reputation of being up and coming??? LOL

True what you said about transport though. It is cheaper than NYC too, and the riverfront park areas are very pleasant.

LOL, Yes, anyone who does not live in hoboken or the city still considers it "up and coming" .. mostly because even though it really was like that 10+ years ago, you can still see new apartments and you can also see one or two 'bad' neighborhoods. In suburbia, every urban areas, excluding NYC, is up-and-coming until it does not have any 'bad' neighborhoods left :lol: and 'bad' is a pretty broad term.

Transplant
Apr. 7, 2009, 08:01 PM
I don't know if I'd live outside the city if it was just to ride horses.

If you're going to college in Manhattan, you're going to be spending most of your time with your classes and your studies. You may have 8am classes or 8pm study groups and your schedule as a college student is going to be pretty wild.

Commuting in or out of Manhattan can be a hassle and you may want to weigh the inconvenience of commuting 5 or more days a week into the city for classes that you have to take versus 2 or so days out of the city for the riding that you love. And if you have to commute in or out of Manhattan during the rush hours, its not pleasant any way you cut it.

The city is expensive but colleges do have student housing which makes it more affordable for students.

University life is a significant change and you'll want to make that part as easy on yourself as possible so you have enough energy left for riding.

ivy62
Apr. 7, 2009, 08:10 PM
To the OP-
Where are you looking at going to school? In all honesty, if your studies are going to keep you that busy made just think about trying to ride on the weekends somewhere or volunteer at one of the rescues retraining horses or something like that...Do not know your expereince level......
When I was in school horses fell by the way side to my studies and I picked it again later when I was more settled....

meupatdoes
Apr. 7, 2009, 08:25 PM
I don't know if I'd live outside the city if it was just to ride horses.

...

University life is a significant change and you'll want to make that part as easy on yourself as possible so you have enough energy left for riding.

Ooooh, I don't know about that.

I work in a law firm in NYC and I live in Jersey City precisely because of the horses. If I didn't have the horses I would live somewhere NOT directly in front of some truck depot and a block away from the projects (although, honestly my building is nice and the walk to and from work is no problem). Roosevelt Island or Brooklyn, for example, would be nice. Or I would just suck it up and live with my parents in Westchester, pay them nominal rent, and have a down payment for my own farm in one year.

Basically, I put the horses somewhere I liked and then moved to suit.


As for school, weeeelll, I went to law school in central/upstate New York and kept my horses in Virginia. I went to school M-W, skipped Th classes, and rode four days a week Th - Sun. (My grades were fine, the class I skipped 25% of being the best.)

Would I kill for that schedule now.

Just to be the voice that say if you manage your time and really, really want it, it's possible.
No matter what.

IsolaBella09
Apr. 7, 2009, 08:33 PM
Ooooh, I don't know about that.

I work in a law firm in NYC and I live in Jersey City precisely because of the horses. If I didn't have the horses I would live somewhere NOT directly in front of some truck depot and a block away from the projects (although, honestly my building is nice and the walk to and from work is no problem). Roosevelt Island or Brooklyn, for example, would be nice. Or I would just suck it up and live with my parents in Westchester, pay them nominal rent, and have a down payment for my own farm in one year.

Basically, I put the horses somewhere I liked and then moved to suit.


As for school, weeeelll, I went to law school in central/upstate New York and kept my horses in Virginia. I went to school M-W, skipped Th classes, and rode four days a week Th - Sun. (My grades were fine, the class I skipped 25% of being the best.)

Would I kill for that schedule now.

Just to be the voice that say if you manage your time and really, really want it, it's possible.
No matter what.

Love, love, love Brooklyn! :D

Transplant
Apr. 7, 2009, 08:53 PM
Ooooh, I don't know about that.

I work in a law firm in NYC and I live in Jersey City precisely because of the horses. If I didn't have the horses I would live somewhere NOT directly in front of some truck depot and a block away from the projects (although, honestly my building is nice and the walk to and from work is no problem). Roosevelt Island or Brooklyn, for example, would be nice. Or I would just suck it up and live with my parents in Westchester, pay them nominal rent, and have a down payment for my own farm in one year.

Basically, I put the horses somewhere I liked and then moved to suit.


As for school, weeeelll, I went to law school in central/upstate New York and kept my horses in Virginia. I went to school M-W, skipped Th classes, and rode four days a week Th - Sun. (My grades were fine, the class I skipped 25% of being the best.)

Would I kill for that schedule now.

Just to be the voice that say if you manage your time and really, really want it, it's possible.
No matter what.

Yeah, if you work and have your own horses, its more convenient to live out of the city especially since boarding a horse in Manhattan isn't really an option :) . At least, when you're working in Manhattan, you're getting paid for the awful commute so you can afford the horses and the work schedule can be more regular. But for a college student who may ride 2x a week and not own her own horse, I just question whether a daily commute to college would be worth it.

A college student's schedule can be highly irregular. My university required at least one M-W-F class so long weekends were out. Classes today give project group assignments and it's possible to start with an 8am class and then end your day with a project study group at 10 at night because that's the only time that everybody can meet. Adding on a commute in and out of Manhattan around too many of these days can induce even the most motivated rider to crash and do nothing on the one or two days off.

meupatdoes
Apr. 7, 2009, 09:13 PM
A college student's schedule can be highly irregular. My university required at least one M-W-F class so long weekends were out. Classes today give project group assignments and it's possible to start with an 8am class and then end your day with a project study group at 10 at night because that's the only time that everybody can meet. Adding on a commute in and out of Manhattan around too many of these days can induce even the most motivated rider to crash and do nothing on the one or two days off.

OK, honestly not trying to be snarky here, but you do realize that, as someone who has graduated from law-school, I also went to college and did that whole experience and know how that works, right? I have been in both 8:30am classes and study groups. (I still rode.)

She will have to weigh the options and decide. If the horses are important enough TO HER, she will plan it around the horses. She won't go to a school that insists on MWF classes if that prevents her from riding. I picked my law school, for example, around the horses. True tales.

If she really wants to go to a particular school that happens to insist on MWF classes (as well as having some attendance requirement where you automatically fail regardless of your exam scores if you don't attend x%, which is a whole different story) and this makes her schedule unworkable for the horses, then she won't ride as much or even at all.

But explaining to her that she shouldn't do x based on your college experience is sort of wet blanketing her before she even picks a school.

cranky
Apr. 7, 2009, 09:28 PM
LOL, Yes, anyone who does not live in hoboken or the city still considers it "up and coming" .. mostly because even though it really was like that 10+ years ago, you can still see new apartments and you can also see one or two 'bad' neighborhoods. In suburbia, every urban areas, excluding NYC, is up-and-coming until it does not have any 'bad' neighborhoods left :lol: and 'bad' is a pretty broad term.


Hell. I lived in Hoboken 20 years ago and it was considered up & coming then! Hoboken is a great place, but good luck trying to own a car there. I would think it would just as hard to get to riding from there as from Manhattan. Maybe harder.

Transplant
Apr. 7, 2009, 09:33 PM
OK, honestly not trying to be snarky here, but you do realize that, as someone who has graduated from law-school, I also went to college and did that whole experience and know how that works, right? I have been in both 8:30am classes and study groups. (I still rode.)

She will have to weigh the options and decide. If the horses are important enough TO HER, she will plan it around the horses. She won't go to a school that insists on MWF classes if that prevents her from riding. I picked my law school, for example, around the horses. True tales.

If she really wants to go to a particular school that happens to insist on MWF classes (as well as having some attendance requirement where you automatically fail regardless of your exam scores if you don't attend x%, which is a whole different story) and this makes her schedule unworkable for the horses, then she won't ride as much or even at all.

But explaining to her that she shouldn't do x based on your college experience is sort of wet blanketing her before she even picks a school.

I wasn't trying to be snarky either, meupatdoes and I definitely wouldn't want to wet blanket someone from riding, :(

Quite the contrary, I'd like to encourage everyone who comes to make an effort because there are so many great riding opportunities around here. But the OP mentioned that she was considering not being able to have a car or being able to ride at all so given that scenario, I was suggesting a way to make the rest of her college life easier so she'd have the time and energy to ride.

That's all; not trying to wet blanket anyone.

Tini Sea Soldier
Apr. 8, 2009, 12:26 AM
Quite honestly... I have to agree that college life is going to take up ALOT of time.

That being said... are you not taking your car bc you don't want to park it in NYC? Or bc you're selling it?

If it was me.. I'd want to have the college experience of living on campus (especially if it's NYU or Fordham). I wouldn't trade my 4 years of friendships and parties and campus life FOR ANYTHING!!! I managed to ride 3-4 days a week, live on campus at the beach... and trek an hour and half out to my horses. I worked my schedule so that I could have the majority of 2 days off...and made one of them my lesson day. Depending on college activities, I either made it out to the barn 1 or 2 days over the weekend. However, regardless of what we were chasing, I refused to sacrifice my college life for horse-showing... I knew that both were equally important.. but I had a short-window of time to experience college, whereas I knew my horses would be there for me when I was ready.

However, I think if you're going to invest money in mass transit to get to and from barns... and have the option of taking a car... I'd recommend bringing your car to school, BUT leaving it at a parking garage in Hoboken or JC. You're gonna need a MetroCard to get you around NYC anyway... so you'll just use it to get to your car also. The cost of this will be about $200. If you do a bit of foraging in JC, you may find it for about $175... but consider $200 for budget purposes. You'll save tunnel fees by keeping it in NJ... and if it's parked in a garage or a lot, it's alot safer and cuts down on the annoying "alternate side of the street" rules and grrrrr... parking tickets.

Hoboken is alot of fun, as is Jersey City where I currently live... but if your school is in NYC... I'd suggest that you stay on campus, for at least your first year... try it out... build some friendships... and then, in your later years, you can figure out if you want to move out to an apt with friends... or move across the river for convenience. JMHO

HorseGalloper
Apr. 8, 2009, 12:52 AM
Wow, thanks for the mass of information!

I will probably be going to Marymount Manhattan College, but am also weighing the idea of going to the community college in Manhattan my first semester to test the waters and see if the city is a fit, without making as much of a financial commitment (though still considerable).

I really have no idea how much free time I'll actually have aside from college life, but am hoping that I can find a place where I can at least hack around for a little bit on weekends. I just want a situation where I can get in the saddle every now and then between breaks.

Unfortunately, I'm not 21, so I wouldn't be able to rent a car. I guess my only options would be to either bring my car with me and find the least expensive way to do that or possibly find other people to ride share with. Marymount doesn't have a riding program, so that's not really an option either.

Thanks for all of the advice and suggestions!

Transplant
Apr. 8, 2009, 08:14 AM
Going to Marymount sounds fun! You'll be on the East side which is closer to the Metro-North train line that goes into Westchester County, New York and Connecticut.

There is a trail riding place in Westchester that you won't need a car to get to. River Ridge, in Eastchester NY, near Twin Lakes, can be reached on a Metro-North train out of Grand Central or 125 Street. You can take the train to Crestwood and take a taxi to the trails. The area is quite beautiful.

The bus ride to Riverdale is also not far from the Marymount campus. Riverdale takes groups to ride in Central Park. Living in Manhattan, I don't necessarily want to take a trip to a barn that's out of the city to come back into the city for a trail ride, but you may like it.

Good luck!

Aubreyyy
Apr. 8, 2009, 11:33 AM
Just wanted to note that the WORST mistake I ever made was selling my car to move to NYC. I thought I wouldn't need it...I was totally wrong.

Since I moved here, there have been at least 100 times since I've smacked myself in the forehead for hocking my car.

So definitely, 100% keep yours! Just park on the way to the barn, in Jersey or somewhere in outer Queens/Long Island that you can get to by subway.

HorseGalloper
Apr. 8, 2009, 04:29 PM
Should I try to find a parking garage and pay for monthly parking or are there areas where I could park my car for a few days at a time without having to worry about it?

joiedevie99
Apr. 8, 2009, 04:35 PM
Should I try to find a parking garage and pay for monthly parking or are there areas where I could park my car for a few days at a time without having to worry about it?

The cost of monthly parking will vary greatly depending on the neighborhood. If you can park out on the west side by the Impound lot, or by the Javitz center, those lots are often near $100 per month- as are some other ones in random places. In the middle of the village, you could pay $400, but its also somewhat feasible to street park in some parts of the village. If you street park, the signs will say things like "No Parking 9-10:30 Mondays and Thursdays, or No Parking 12-1:30 Tuesdays and Fridays." Those are street cleaning times and you have to move the car for than hour and a half. Otherwise, you can leave the car there. For an average person it means moving the car ~4 times per week, since they are at work during those times- they can't just sit in the car with the blinkers on until the truck passes and then re-park.

linquest
Apr. 8, 2009, 04:41 PM
I hear Riverdale is charging $100/hour for the trail rides in Central Park :eek: Probably an experience you'll want to do once, but on a regular basis....

There are some places in Brooklyn that you can street-park, but pretty much everywhere in the five boroughs you'll have to move the car at least once or twice a week. I personally still think ZipCar or Mint is a better option than keeping your own car in the city though, if you don't need to drive daily for work.

Aubreyyy
Apr. 8, 2009, 04:48 PM
I personally still think ZipCar or Mint is a better option than keeping your own car in the city though, if you don't need to drive daily for work.

Gotta be 21 for it though, which is a problem for over half of the college riders in the city :( I REJOICED the day I turned 21...not b/c I could drink, but b/c I could rent a ZipCar and ride! (Ok...the drinking was cool too? lol)

Or you could just make friends with someone via Coth and try to hitch rides! I wouldn't mind coordinating with someone to split the cost of a ZipCar- it'd only be about $30 each on the weekends, half that during the week?

If you come to Manhattan, let me know!

HorseGalloper
Apr. 8, 2009, 05:03 PM
You all have been a huge help!

I'm going to look into a parking garage, but I think I will probably end up leaving my car at home just because it would be much less expensive to split a Zip car than it would be to keep it anywhere near the city. If I just left it at home I wouldn't have to worry about paying for a parking garage, full coverage insurance (which is a few hundred a month for me because of my age), or gas... I'll definitely let you know Aubreyyy!

linquest
Apr. 8, 2009, 05:06 PM
Zipcar- at certain colleges, Zipcar has a special agreement to let students 18-21 into the program. And then you won't have to worry about insurance, gas, or parking tickets outside of the time you use it. When I had a car in NYC, I got a parking ticket, or worse, a towing fee, at least once a year. I swear they make the parking signs confusing just to generate revenue :mad:

MintHillFarm
Apr. 9, 2009, 11:58 AM
I would like to attend school in NYC, but am weighing in the factor of not being able to ride as often if at all. Has anyone managed this and if so, how? I probably won't have my car with me, so I would have to rely on public transportation. Is it even possible to ride without having a car to drive out of the city to barns?

Thanks!


When I worked in NYC in advertising, I boarded my horse in Rye and would either ride after work or really early before work; I showered and dressed at the barn and then drove back into the city. I did have a car and things were WAY different on the late 70's early 80's! Also the barn was, without traffic, a very easy ride from my apartment on 90th and 2nd to Rye, that farm is no longer there...

Now as far as barns go today, there are some that would be able to be reached by train and then a cab (I would think eventually you get get a ride from the station to the barn) but you'd have to do some research on the areas. I am sure you can find something.

BonViv
May. 10, 2009, 03:18 PM
I lived in NYC (off and on) for 10 years; didn't ride for the first 4. In retrospect, it was a good idea to take a little time off (and just ride when I went home for holidays). I was still able to go back after leaving (the first time) and turn pro.

I second the idea of making sure you find time to enjoy everything that is NYC. There's no duplicating it anywhere in the world.

As for parking, I've discovered certain areas of town have more street parking than others. I've always been able to find parking on the UES (above 89th) and Chelsea (close to the west side hwy). You just have to be diligent about remembering opposite sides parking. You'll learn the tricks to getting good parking. Also, think about other 'burbs outside the city if you're really serious about the horse thing. Certain parts of Queens and Riverdale (the neighborhood) in the Bronx usually have better parking and are within easy train ride to most NY colleges.

For those riding in NJ - where are you riding? And is it show-oriented or lesson-type barn? Any thoughts from those who might ride on LI?

Playing Games
May. 10, 2009, 03:58 PM
Wow, thanks for the mass of information!

I will probably be going to Marymount Manhattan College, but am also weighing the idea of going to the community college in Manhattan my first semester to test the waters and see if the city is a fit, without making as much of a financial commitment (though still considerable).

I really have no idea how much free time I'll actually have aside from college life, but am hoping that I can find a place where I can at least hack around for a little bit on weekends. I just want a situation where I can get in the saddle every now and then between breaks.

Unfortunately, I'm not 21, so I wouldn't be able to rent a car. I guess my only options would be to either bring my car with me and find the least expensive way to do that or possibly find other people to ride share with. Marymount doesn't have a riding program, so that's not really an option either.

Thanks for all of the advice and suggestions!

I went to Marymount Manhattan College. The great thing about it was their flexible class scheduling program. Understandably, you will have all kinds of work to do in order to complete the courses, but on the other hand you will definately be able to fit riding into your schedule.

They do have housing for students, which will cost you considerably less than renting an apartment. Maybe what you can do is save on housing and use it toward monthly payments to keep your car in a garage there. It's not cheap, but I recommend it over street parking.

nycjumper
May. 10, 2009, 04:08 PM
I did it for years without a car and had a horse in NJ while living in NYC. You *can* ride without having a car but it is not easy. Period. You need to budget at least an hour each way on public transportation. Plus ride time. So factor in at least 4 hours out of your schedule per ride.

In NJ - you can get to Garret (which is more casual & less expensive) via bus from Port Authority. When I boarded there, the care was good, the facilities were average. They have new management there so I can't comment on the care now. Essex is also accessible via bus from Port Authority (it's about a 15 minute walk from the bus stop). When I rode there, there was a much stronger focus on shows and it was fairly expensive and no-turnout. But lovely indoor ring.

In LI, you can get to Knoll, probably the easiest. Wasn't my favorite barn but to each his/her own.

I looked at Twin Lakes and Fox Hollow in Westchester, both nice but btwn the train pass & taxis and lesson fees, they were fairly pricey.

Riding in NYC isn't easy. You can do it but it's going to be a sacrifice. It just depends on how much you want it. If you have a car, the world is your oyster - there are tons of great barns in NJ that I would recommend that aren't a bad commute if you are doing it in off-hours (aka, not rush hour).

Good luck.

Natalie A
May. 10, 2009, 04:56 PM
Contemplating moving to NYC after grad school, great to know it's possible to get to a barn via public transit since I'm not able to drive -- what is the average cost for lessons in the area (a breakdown of private/group would be nice)?

nycjumper
May. 11, 2009, 07:07 AM
It's been more than 2 years since I was in NYC but at the time, prices were around $35 per hour for group lesson at Garret, $60 hour for private. Essex was $55 for private half-hour (no hour private) or $65 for hour group. Knoll was somewhere in the middle pricewise IIRC, maybe $50 an hour for a group?

S A McKee
May. 11, 2009, 09:31 AM
In LI, you can get to Knoll, probably the easiest. Wasn't my favorite barn but to each his/her own.



Knoll Farm is about 30 miles from the Queens county line.
Old Westbury is about 10 miles from the county line.

Lots more choices in Old Westbury. Especially if you are interested in H/J or are interested in showing.

There is a nearby train stop going to Knoll but to go to Old Westbury there is a train stop in Roslyn, 3-4 miles away. There is LI bus service to CW Post college.

You will need transportation from the train station to the farm, regardless if it's Knoll or Old Westbury barns.

Probably easier to get to Westchester to ride.

Transplant
May. 11, 2009, 11:52 AM
You don't need a taxi to get from the train station to Knoll. The barn is right across the street. Of course in bad weather similar to the snowstorm I walked through when I visited, some transportation is nice.

The 30 minute private lesson I had was not so bad, about $50. But you need to pay a $25 insurance fee upfront and the roundtrip train fare on the weekends is $20 which to me is somewhat pricey.

BAC
May. 11, 2009, 01:21 PM
and the roundtrip train fare on the weekends is $20 which to me is somewhat pricey.

And it will even more expensive when the new prices go into effect in June or July. :(

LetsChat
May. 11, 2009, 04:04 PM
Yeah, if you work and have your own horses, its more convenient to live out of the city especially since boarding a horse in Manhattan isn't really an option :) . At least, when you're working in Manhattan, you're getting paid for the awful commute so you can afford the horses and the work schedule can be more regular. But for a college student who may ride 2x a week and not own her own horse, I just question whether a daily commute to college would be worth it.

A college student's schedule can be highly irregular. My university required at least one M-W-F class so long weekends were out. Classes today give project group assignments and it's possible to start with an 8am class and then end your day with a project study group at 10 at night because that's the only time that everybody can meet. Adding on a commute in and out of Manhattan around too many of these days can induce even the most motivated rider to crash and do nothing on the one or two days off.

What college do you go too? I can't imagine it being too large if EVERY semester, EVERY student MUST take a M,W,F class, how many professors would they need? I went to a HUGE state college, I can't even phathom the school requiring you to take a class on a specific day other than that being when the professor has the class, not that you MUST be on campus at that time. Sounds like a boarding school for grade kids!