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View Full Version : IHSA cost per semster** see post #20



mothermucker12
Mar. 31, 2009, 06:05 PM
so my daughter's IHSA team is increasing their "dues" for next semester... not including travel, shows, trainer fee day of show, just lesson (1x per week and a hack ride). just curious what everyone is paying...BTW it is a club at her school, so school pays nothing towards the club...also not including registration fee to IHSA

Pirateer
Mar. 31, 2009, 06:07 PM
Thank god for being fully funded. My school required us only to pay the $35 (or whatever) IHSA registration fee, plus costs of lessons which were included in school credits...

(and we never paid travel, show fees, trainer, anything)

sp56
Mar. 31, 2009, 06:33 PM
I was one of the founding members of the team at UCLA and we didn't receive any funding either. We had to make the girls pay for everything, including carpooling costs, lesson costs, show costs, etc. If we were able to fund raise then we would use that money to help offset costs. We were pretty lenient regarding lessons and let people ride where they wanted to. Shows fees were $35-$40/class - max anyone could ride was 2 classes per day.

It was kind of a bummer financially but still a lot cheaper than regular showing. Putting on shows was stressful but fun overall.

lauraware
Mar. 31, 2009, 06:34 PM
I paid $15 to register with my school's club sports organization, the IHSA member fee, and $50 "team dues" for the year (this goes towards a sweet T-shirt that says "UCLA Equestrian" and reimbursement for the drivers' gas). But, we do not have a coach or organized team lessons. We kind of just show up at the shows and have fun!

JayTee
Mar. 31, 2009, 06:47 PM
$30 to register with the IHSA. Lesson fees ($350 for 10) only if you can afford them, otherwise school covers all or part of the cost. Shows are paid for. I guess gas can add up a bit, but other riders and/or the team funds usually chip in for that. No team dues. As a club team, we're very lucky to have such a supportive student senate.

joiedevie99
Mar. 31, 2009, 07:00 PM
When I was captain of my team, we charged $250 per semester for one group lesson per week, plus you had to pay your own IHSA dues. If you wanted two lessons per week, you paid double. If you wanted to hack, you arranged that directly with the trainer and paid her directly. The small yearly stipend from the school covered show expenses and coaching at the shows. Our fundraisers covered gas for the drivers, and the occasional van rental.

RW06
Mar. 31, 2009, 07:58 PM
We have to fundraise $100 a semester... this can include parental donations to the team, selling team apparel, etc. We also pay $30/class at shows. It used to be $22 but they upped it last semester :(. Lessons are $400 for a package of 8 and hacks are $15 each. While we are a club, we do get some funding fromt the Student Senate which we use for coaching fees and travel costs. If you are a driver for lessons, you pay $350. If you attend all of the horse shows, even as a spectator, you get a $75 refund at the end of the semester.

mothermucker12
Mar. 31, 2009, 08:34 PM
the trainer is not there for the hack rides, they are just expected to go and hack the horses once a week...the barn is 20 minutes away

c'est moi
Mar. 31, 2009, 08:35 PM
We pay $40 a lesson and our IHSA dues which I think are around $30/year. We are only required to take a lesson the week before the show (as long as we ride at least once a week somewhere else) but most of us take a lesson once a week anyway. We are also responsible for paying club dues which is about $10/year. Our club pays for everything else including entry and hotel fees as well as gas money for anyone who drives to the show.

We have a very small team, only around five riders at each show!

mothermucker12
Mar. 31, 2009, 08:35 PM
also i'm curious how long ago you guys paid your ammounts...
I'll let you know what they are asking when a few more people chime in...

Ben and Me
Mar. 31, 2009, 08:57 PM
It is a varsity sport where I went to college, so the school funded everything--we had a bus to get to shows, lessons paid for, IHSA dues paid for, etc. They were talking about implementing a fee for this year, but we fought it because we didn't feel it was fair to charge a varsity sport a fee, especially at a DIII school (where none of the sports are revenue-raisers). Apparently since it is an NCAA emerging sport, schools are allowed to charge a fee even if it is considered a varsity sport there.

MR
Mar. 31, 2009, 09:04 PM
When I was in school (10 yrs ago now!), our team was a club sport with minimal funding from the school. We didn't have "dues" per say, but we did have to pay for everything. A average quarter would include the following costs:
* IHSA membership (once a year-Fall; it's now $30-40 per year)
* 1+ lesson a week (at your choice of barns - averaging about $40 a lesson)
* All IHSA horse show fees (at the time, $20 per class, with an average of 2 classes a day, 3-5 shows a month)
* All travel fees (gas, hotel room share, food, etc)
We also had to cover other stuff like Team Sweatshirts, etc.
We did do some fundraising, which paid for our yearly Team Membership ($150/school/yr) and other travel expenses (to Regionals, Zones, Nat'ls, etc).

Recently, I've helped a local IHSA team - also a club sport. They charge dues: $150/quarter for "team" competing members, $50 for "club" non-competing members. Dues pay for:
* Team sweatshirt - team and club
* Other team events (local hang out time, group trail rides, etc) - team and club
* IHSA memberships (individual + team) - if "team" competing member
* A few IHSA horse show classes - "team" member
* Some show travel fees - "team" member
Dues do not cover any lessons (school does not have horses). They also do some fundraising to make addt'l $$ to help with team and "club" expenses.

superpony123
Mar. 31, 2009, 10:00 PM
i think it usually depends on the school, because ive seen different costs for different schools i'm thinking of applying to. it probably has a lot to do with how highly ranked the schools team is, because the better the team, the better their trainer and training facility is, most likely--which means more expensive.

horsegirl520
Mar. 31, 2009, 10:22 PM
I think I paid $575 this semester and we're required to fundraise on top of that. I can't remember if that covered the IHSA membership fee or not. That includes 1 lesson per week, horseshows, and transportation.

hj0519
Mar. 31, 2009, 10:27 PM
Last semester I paid $350 (or maybe $300?), this semester was $150, we're trying to get it eliminated completely. We're varsity, so the school funds pretty much everything.

kateh
Mar. 31, 2009, 11:23 PM
IHSA fee ($30? $35?)
Lesson package ~$16 per lesson in 8 or 12 week packages
Fundraising-$100 nonshowing members, $125 for show team members, if you don't fundraise it you pay out of pocket
Show ads-$60 or pay out of pocket
Class fees at shows-currently $24/class, anticipating an increase soon
Club Membership-I forget how much, something under $30

Included:
all transportation
coaching at shows
hotels for overnight shows
formal (must pay for any dates)
team-owned show clothes, tall boots, helmets
team-owned schooling helmets and boots (really only used by beginners)

joiedevie99
Mar. 31, 2009, 11:36 PM
When I was captain of my team, we charged $250 per semester for one group lesson per week, plus you had to pay your own IHSA dues. If you wanted two lessons per week, you paid double. If you wanted to hack, you arranged that directly with the trainer and paid her directly. The small yearly stipend from the school covered show expenses and coaching at the shows. Our fundraisers covered gas for the drivers, and the occasional van rental.

Mine, pasted above, was around 2004. The trainer was not there for our hacks either, and barn was 25-30 minutes away. Everyone had to take 1 lesson per week to show. Two was encouraged for intermediate and open riders, but no one was required to take two lessons. Several people either half leased at the barn, or worked out agreements to hack private horses occasionally- but those had nothing to do with the team so I know nothing about the financials there.

Pookah
Mar. 31, 2009, 11:44 PM
It varies a LOT. I graduated in 2002 from a school that did IHSA as a club sport; I was president of the team for 4 years and we had to significantly increase dues during that time. We required 2 lessons per week to show, and also offered a 1x per week option for students who wanted to ride but not compete IHSA. We also had several members who paid $15 for the year and did not ride at all, but supported the team. We basically charged the cost of lessons for the number of weeks offered, and fundraised the rest of our costs. Generally, it was $600-800 in the fall semester, and $400-700 in the spring semester. We started lessons about two weeks before the first show, and continued through the final show. It's not a cheap sport, and unfortunately it's difficult as a club sport to raise sufficient funds to make it affordable and be competitive. We did get about $2000/year from the school club sports fund--allocations were voted by the presidents of each club, and our other club sports were very understanding of our high expenses and voted accordingly. One thing your daughter's team might want to consider--we began hosting IHSA shows (as well as schooling shows as fundraisers). They are a nightmare to put on, and they do require the availability of quite a few horses, BUT they do make money. By the time I graduated, we were running on about a $15K annual budget, with a nice cushion in the bank. We did a lot of fundraising to get there, but it can be done.

way2trvld2
Mar. 31, 2009, 11:50 PM
I'm still in the IHSA at a D3 school and we pay the $30 annual dues, $550 a semester for 2 lessons a week and we have a big fundraiser in the fall that every team member has to donate something to a silent auction over parents weekend.

mothermucker12
Apr. 1, 2009, 07:11 AM
Ok, ready for this.......last semster $850.....next semester $1000!!!! Personally I think that's rediculous! and that's just for 1 lesson a week...even at the top barns in my area we would only pay $35 for a group lesson and maybe $10 extra if you used their horses!! My daughter said that the trainer wants to make more money and they need to pay for some of the cost for the care of the horses . Now this is a large school, with a very good NCAA team...can't wait to see what they are going to ask by the time she's a senior!! BTW she's finishing her freshman year..

jn4jenny
Apr. 1, 2009, 07:33 AM
Nobody likes to pay more mothermucker, but at $45 per lesson (assuming use of lesson horse) and one $15 hack per week (which would be an absolute bargain for a hack), that's $900 per semester. Plus $100 to try and keep the team afloat--heck, that won't even pay for Adequan for a single horse for 4 months.

I am facing down graduate school in the fall so I know exactly how it feels to be trying to ride on a small budget. It is no fun to pay more and get the same or less than you're used to. But it's still a bargain compared to half-leasing a horse elsewhere and paying for lessons on top of that--or if it's not, as you're claiming, then maybe it's time for DD to start riding elsewhere. Alternately, you could propose some creative fundraising ideas for the team; I know that on some IHSA teams, if you participate actively in fundraising your dues are lowered.

mothermucker12
Apr. 1, 2009, 08:54 AM
she has a horse at home, so there is no need to lease.....also they never host any shows every show they have to travel to...it just seems very steep to me!!

horsepix76
Apr. 1, 2009, 09:07 AM
I think $1000/semester is ridiculous.

I was a founding member of my alma mater's IHSA team in 1997-98 (UW-Madison, a Big 10 school). The school pretty much laughed at us when we applied as a varsity sport back then. Therefore, we paid everything ourselves, plus had to be members of our school's riding club. However, we car pooled, shared hotel rooms, shared show clothing, etc. We pretty much did everything we could to keep costs down. It was (and still is to my knowledge) a club sport.

Honestly, I don't know what they charge now as its a totally different monster. While we scrounged for members and paid everything ourselves, the current team has try-outs and requires 2 group lessons per week. However, they've also been the zone champions (qualified as a team for nationals) for the last 6 years in a row, so it really has become something big.

But still...$1000 per semester seems really steep to me...

NRC260
Apr. 1, 2009, 09:50 AM
When I was in college 3 years ago. We paid $1000 a semester for our IHSA team. That fee included the IHSA shows and two lessons a semester and free rides, granted your daughter is only getting one lesson a semester. I felt like $1000 a semester was a good deal compared to what my parents paid for me to ride in high school with a trainer.

WorthTheWait95
Apr. 1, 2009, 09:59 AM
When I was in college 3 years ago. We paid $1000 a semester for our IHSA team. That fee included the IHSA shows and two lessons a semester and free rides, granted your daughter is only getting one lesson a semester. I felt like $1000 a semester was a good deal compared to what my parents paid for me to ride in high school with a trainer.

I'm not involved in IHSA but $1000 seems dirt cheap for showing, lessons, use of horses, etc. I don't know what the norm is in that world but when you think about how much it costs to board one horse + training each month and show that's pennies. That's only around $200-250/month. I agree the one lesson a month is kinda low though...seems like they should be getting at least 2-3.

Ben and Me
Apr. 1, 2009, 11:01 AM
From their website...

$975 per semester

Fee includes excellent hunter seat instruction for all levels (2 times a week)
Appropriate-level classes scheduled around academics
Small group lessons (average 6)
Approximately 30 high-quality university-owned horses
Fee includes some weekend extra riding privileges
Private schooling sessions also available at no extra cost
Opportunities to show at intercollegiate shows (all fees paid by university)
Opportunities to show at open shows with no extra coaching or horse rental fees

In bold is the big money saver!

Overall, it is pretty inexpensive considering what you get--a barn on campus, great school horses, great instruction, etc. Of course, riding is a main reason that people choose to attend Hollins--but Hollins is also a school with a fairly small endowment. We competed against Hollins and didn't have to pay a fee, but we only had a few school horses and a much larger endowment.

Hollins is also located in a relatively inexpensive area of the country. I'd imagine you might get less "bang for your buck" if you were in California or NY/NJ/CT.

However, they have an excellent program which is supported by the university as much more than just a club; I'd consider their prices, amenities, and level of support to be what other schools should aim for.

findeight
Apr. 1, 2009, 11:04 AM
Reality check...

Was just reading, maybe Useless A Today, that many colleges are going to have to charge more across the board or cut many sports because money that used to be there is just not going to be there anymore.

Whether from the state or from the traditional donation sources and grants, it's just not there like it used to be.

This instance, the charges went up...what? $200 for a 12 week period? $16 a week?

Admit...she does not seem to be getting much for that money...but it is an optional activity, maybe riding on her own is a better choice.

But I wouldn't assume colleges are going to be funding much of anything that does not make them money in the next few years.

caqh
Apr. 1, 2009, 11:17 AM
I was first going to reply that $1000/semester is outrageous, but if my team's riders added up everything, it might come out to that amount per person. The team is club, therefore the University has set rules regarding how much they (the University) will provide in terms of financial support, and how much the club can charge per quarter/semester. Being the priciest club on campus, they charge the max dues per quarter ($250), and also receive the most funding (but it provides a small dent in the cost of maintaining a string of 30 horses). Students pay out of pocket for show entry fees, IHSA membership, show gear, and team gear (warm-ups, t-shirts, sweatshirts, etc etc).

Quarterly dues cover:
Lessons - 2-4 per week for everyone, regardless of level (the team has roughly 6 coaches)
As many hacks as possible for everyone above walk-trot/walk-jog
Hotel and gas for shows
Dues also contribute to the overall upkeep of the horses as well (vet, farrier, chiro, tack, blankets, etc etc)

Donations (both cash and in-kind) are a huge form of support for the team. The team also maintains an inventory of show clothes, so if someone can't afford their own stuff, there's a very good chance they can borrow from the team closet to turned out appropriately.

So to answer the question: the team charges $250/quarter per student, but the total out-of-pocket expense for each kid over the course of the season can be considerably more.

mothermucker12
Apr. 1, 2009, 12:47 PM
I think $1000 dollars a semester is HUGE, especially considering it does not include showing, hotels, trianer show fee, etc...just one weekly lesson on horses that are the NCAA team's rejects...school doesn't give anything....so now I'm asking what kind of fund raising can they do? What have you done to keep down the cost??

FarnleyGarnet
Apr. 1, 2009, 12:57 PM
If I did my math correctly it's about an 18% increase.

Just trying to get clarification because you mentioned your daughter's school has both NCAA and IHSA? And your daughter is on the IHSA team, not the NCAA team right? And the facility is off campus. Is it used for the school only? Or is it also a boarding/lesson barn?

Are the teams riding at the same facility? Is there a possibility that they are increasing the IHSA fee because the school isn't covering all the costs of the NCAA team? (I'm not even sure if that's allowed.) Then again that's really not that big of an increase considering how much costs have increased on pretty much everything these days. Maybe the facility is increasing the price for IHSA because IHSA is bringing in less money than a boarder who lessons and shows would? (Opportunity cost).

Is the school in an expensive area? $1,000 sounds expensive for one lesson a week, especially if the girls pay for their own show entries and transportation to and from the shows. Then again it might be exactly right given the location of the school. Does the team have the ability to shop around for a different facility and coach for the team?

Wonders12
Apr. 1, 2009, 01:01 PM
I started my IHSA team, and I'm not going to go into the details of what we pay, since other people already have.

But I would have your daughter ASK exactly where every penny of that $1000 goes. As president/captain, I know where all our money goes. Obviously it's going somewhere since they probably aren't just hoarding thousands of dollars. If a riders' mom wanted to question the price hike, I would be more than willing to work with the daughter to explain the changes.

A couple things to consider:
Does the school own the barn? If not, the trainer they're using might have raised prices or changed something.
Do they own the horses? Maybe someone needs new medicines, the price of board/hay increased...

Basically, just ask. If they can't tell you where that money is going, that's a little fishy. Otherwise, tell your daughter to get involved. Be one of the people that MAKES these decisions! :winkgrin:

FarnleyGarnet
Apr. 1, 2009, 01:18 PM
I posted too slow and you just answered most of my questions. :)

Here's what Virginia Tech does for fundraising.
Background: Facilities are on campus, horses are owned and paid for by the university. VT provides passenger vans for travel to shows but Club must cover gas expenses. Equestrian Club funds the 3 Equestrian teams (IHSA hunter, IHSA western, IDA). Equestrian Club is now a Rec Sports Club so they get a small stipend from an athletic fund (estimating, 2k per year). That's the only money that is provided.

Equestrian Club dues: $25/semester, $40/year. You don't have to be on the team to be in the club. Estimate 80+ members. Club members must earn points to stay in good standing each semester: Team Members: 2 Social, 2 Service, 2 Fundraising, 1 Miscellaneous, and 1 Barn Point. Club Members: 1 Social, 1 Service, 1 Fundraising, and 1 Miscellaneous. At the end of the semester if you aren't in good standing you must pay a $50 fine to be reactivated (team members also must sit out a show).

Fundraising Events:
Biggest fundraiser is selling boardwalk fries at Pimlico during the Preakness & Virgin Music Festival (estimate 5k+ each summer). Very lucky to have this connection.
Concession stand at IHSA/IDA horse shows hosted by VT
Silent Auction at IHSA/IDA horse shows hosted by VT
Profit from horse shows hosted at VT
Going around to local businesses for donations/sponsors at IHSA/IDA shows.
Club sells clothing, saddle pads, etc throughout the year (see www.sewpony.com). Mark up on items brings in money for club.
Bake sales, events at local restaurants, car wash, etc.
Club used to host a Date Auction each year that was very successful but was eventually banned.
Club used to assist with annual Dominion Saddlery Tent Sale in Northern VA until shop was bought by Dover.

The semester fee to ride at VT is $500. Riders get course credit and 2 lessons per week plus practice sessions before shows. No coaching fee at shows (Coach is faculty of VT). Riders pay their own entries and IHSA dues, Club usually makes enough to cover gas to shows and hotels for all riders. Riders pay for their own food at shows. Some years the Club made enough to cover additional things like entries for Tournament of Champions, Regionals, Zones, Nationals, etc.

Hope this helps!

mothermucker12
Apr. 1, 2009, 01:21 PM
good questions....i'll ask

the IHSA and NCAA teams practice at different barns
The IHSA barn boards other horses as well...their trainer left last semester to work for david oconnor, new trainer is a girl that used to ride for UGA, the girls like her
but apparently she wants more money too!!

DuffyAgain
Apr. 1, 2009, 01:25 PM
I haven't read enough details from the OP to have an opinion on the cost. As others have said, she says it's a big NCAA school. If your daughter is on that team, I thought most had no cost?

OP says that her daughter rides the NCAA reject horses. I'm taking this to mean she does not ride on that team, but is doing the "club" part?

Did I read the $1000 per semester does NOT include showing fees? Most of the IHSA coaches I know do not charge for training at the IHSA shows.


Edited to add after OP's most recent post....So, if I'm reading correctly, NEITHER barn are owned by this huge NCAA school? (NCAA will not allow same coach to coach NCAA and IHSA, I believe, so that part makes sense - the two barn situation depending on trainer relationship.) Does the club pay the trainer directly? What else are you being charged for?

Also - have to admit - curious as to what school........

way2trvld2
Apr. 1, 2009, 03:01 PM
the silent auction during parents weekend that we put on every year is usually a big money earner, sometimes parents will donate like a weekend at a ski/beach house that alone can bring in 1-2k. i think overall last year we made around 10k? we also did fundraising to get all the 30+ school horses new blankets and were able to raise enough to by everything a light and a heavy weight baker turnout. We also run a bouncy house at football games for kids that is always really popular for families. Fundraising to offset costs has definitely helped keep our prices down.

DuffyAgain
Apr. 1, 2009, 04:47 PM
GREAT fundraising ideas, guys!!! :yes::):yes:

Mav226
Apr. 1, 2009, 04:51 PM
We paid 900+ for 2 lessons/week plus weekend hacking for those qualified. I graduated in '04.

Obviously, shows were extra. Training at the shows was included.

mothermucker12
Apr. 1, 2009, 08:28 PM
I haven't read enough details from the OP to have an opinion on the cost. As others have said, she says it's a big NCAA school. If your daughter is on that team, I thought most had no cost?

OP says that her daughter rides the NCAA reject horses. I'm taking this to mean she does not ride on that team, but is doing the "club" part?

Did I read the $1000 per semester does NOT include showing fees? Most of the IHSA coaches I know do not charge for training at the IHSA shows.


Edited to add after OP's most recent post....So, if I'm reading correctly, NEITHER barn are owned by this huge NCAA school? (NCAA will not allow same coach to coach NCAA and IHSA, I believe, so that part makes sense - the two barn situation depending on trainer relationship.) Does the club pay the trainer directly? What else are you being charged for?

Also - have to admit - curious as to what school........


DD is on IHSA team, yes they pay trainer directly, dues only cover lesson 1x week and 1 hack ride(trainer isn't around for that) not sure who owns NCAA barn, but school does not own IHSA barn....i don't think naming the school is important, but you can PM me if you want

horserider12
Apr. 1, 2009, 09:44 PM
I coach an intercollegiate team and own the barn they train at. The school pays me for coaching at the shows, Team members pay 330.00 per semester. For this they get as many lessons per week as they can do, unlimited hacking. The team pays for the shows and all travel expenses out of their budget and most of their money comes from what they make when running their horse show each year.

Pookah
Apr. 1, 2009, 11:26 PM
Yes, it's a lot of $$$, but a few things to remember: it's still WAY cheaper than boarding her horse near college and paying for lessons and showing. Plus, it is ridiculously expensive to run an IHSA team, too. Honestly, it surprises me that so many coaches are willing to take it on. Unless you're already running a lesson program for adults, or you have client or sale horses that you can teach on, you're maintaining horses that are big enough for adults to ride and sound enough to jump a 2'6" course--and you're not using them in the winter or summer when school is out. It is expensive, and a big increase, but honestly, as someone who's been out of school for approaching a decade, I have to say that IHSA changed who I was as a person, and has made a huge impact in my life. I work in a job that I love, for a logistics company, and without a doubt many of the skills that I use daily I learned managing the team, and our horse shows. I captained my school's team for four years, and built it from very small and broke to nationally competitive and financially healthy--and when I graduated and started working, within 6 months of being hired, I was handed a $5MM facility to run. Obviously, it's debatable how much of that is due to IHSA, and certainly there are lots of other factors, but my point is that college teams can be a fabulous testing and learning ground for kids. One thing that I always told our team was that the more fundraising we did, the less our dues would be--perhaps your daughter's team could do more fundraising to offset the increased cost. Also, it seems like it might be a great time to propose hosting a show!

Sorry, I know I'm a little bit of an IHSA fanatic, but I LOVED intercollegiate, and I truly do believe that it changed (for the better) who I am today, plus, 7 years after I graduated, I still count some of my old teammates among my best friends.

Rio Blanco
Apr. 2, 2009, 12:44 AM
Our school is NCAA, but since you can only go to one National's, we chose IHSA to be competitive in and do only a couple of the NCAA shows per year... we call them scrimmages, as for our team, it's basically a warm-up for an important show for points or for zones or something. We have a HUGE team (38 girls) so IHSA allows more of us to show... this year, everyone got to show at least once, and we usually take about 20 girls to every show.

Our school owns our barn, employs our coaches, and doesn't charge us for team practices (2 jumping and 1 flat per week; 3 jumping and the rest are hacks every day the week before a show) We don't have to pay hotel, gas, coaching, etc. fees... we have to pay for an occassional meal (usually fast food on the way to the shows that are a 2 day drive away from the university) and our annual IHSA dues, plus our class fees. I usually show both "shows" (days) of IHSA for $80.

I've transferred for the fall though... it's going to be an adjustment to having to pay for at least 1 weekly lesson at the school's chosen "trainer" (local trainer, who isn't very good even at that level :X) plus gas and hotel and all that... thank goodness they don't usually take the "trainer" to shows! I might get a little grumpy about having to pay for that... especially when it's not my trainer of choice. But the way I see it is that I will be lucky to do 3 AA shows with my mare this year... IHSA / NCAA allows me to show... so it serves it's purpose as a cheaper alternative to the A circuit.

Wonders12
Apr. 2, 2009, 01:17 AM
Our school owns our barn, employs our coaches, and doesn't charge us for team practices (2 jumping and 1 flat per week; 3 jumping and the rest are hacks every day the week before a show) We don't have to pay hotel, gas, coaching, etc. fees...

I wish! What school was this at?

Rio Blanco
Apr. 2, 2009, 10:14 AM
WTAMU. It's a pretty sweet deal for our equestrian team, I'm not going to lie. But we have to put a lot back into the program... we all have 1 - 2 schoolies that we have to groom weekly, a western saddle/bridle and an english saddle/bridle to be cleaned weekly, an hour of work the week of a home show - not including almost all day the Friday before a home show. We've got some awesome schoolies as far as athleticism and talent/ability go (both h/j and western/reining) and then we've got the not-so-fancy but make you ride the tails off of them to get the right response undersaddle. Also, since we are NCAA, we get 2 (painful) strength training workouts per week with the athletic trainer... which are paid for by the school.

It's funny how the schoolies grow on you... my chosen groom horse was my favorite horse of all of them at school and we sadly lost her last weekend and I was bawling my eyes out when coach told me about her. My other groom horse I couldn't stand at first and now he's a pretty cool dude IMO and I can actually touch his ears after 5 months of messing with him! haha. We are definately lucky to have the WIDE range of horses that we do - and the program that we do.