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Cubs
Mar. 3, 2009, 06:45 PM
I was just told by a vet that there is single case of a horse herniating a disc in the cervical spine. This is extremely rare since horses are not built to rupture a disc. I've never heard this happening before. When I get more information, including the vet who made the diagnosis, I will post it here. If you're interested, let me know.

Daniel Kamen, D.C.

Pancakes
Mar. 3, 2009, 09:45 PM
Wow, yeah, I'd be interested! That is exceedingly rare. I've only ever heard of herniated discs in small animals. I would be interested to know what the circumstances were, the horse's conformation/height, etc... Do tell!

SBF
Mar. 6, 2009, 06:22 AM
Pancakes, it sounds like you've figured it out, but just for the record - it is impossible for a horse to have a herniated disc. Intervertebral discs in horses are all fibrous tissue (no fluid-filled sac) and therefore cannot herniate.

Cubs
Mar. 6, 2009, 09:48 AM
Pancakes, it sounds like you've figured it out, but just for the record - it is impossible for a horse to have a herniated disc. Intervertebral discs in horses are all fibrous tissue (no fluid-filled sac) and therefore cannot herniate.

Gee, SBF, what else did you research? No doubt a scholar. You're really educatiing Pancakes (a third year vet student who had a genuine interest in this and apparently not a bone to pick). We all know how well we can trust your information. And yes, it was in the cervical spine, not lumbar--I had that part wrong. Whoever you are, check your facts before popping your uninformed geyser, old faithfiul.
A horse does have a nucleus pulposus in the center of their disc. It is much drier compared to a dog or person, but they do have one. Would that be considered less dense or more dense in the center?
I don't know why I'm including the link to the real research on the herniated horse cervical disc, but here it is. This is for Pancakes only since no one else cares to know the difference.

http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/picrender.fcgi?artid=1790361&blobtype=pdf

Cubs
Mar. 8, 2009, 09:51 AM
How do you know this is a troll, and why would they troll with a topic like this? Genuine naiive question :)


Did you see this link to the protruding cervical disc?
http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/picrender.fcgi?artid=1790361&blobtype=pdf

Patty Stiller
Mar. 8, 2009, 12:32 PM
The OP is not a troll....http://animalchiropractic.com/
(google is great)

That said, I have heard from both vetrinarians and equine chiropractors that it is nearly imposible for a horse to hernate a disc due to the anatomy of their spine , but Dr Kamen since YOU'RE the doctor so you should know. ;)

Cubs
Mar. 8, 2009, 01:26 PM
The OP is not a troll....http://animalchiropractic.com/
(google is great)

That said, I have heard from both vetrinarians and equine chiropractors that it is nearly imposible for a horse to hernate a disc due to the anatomy of their spine , but Dr Kamen since YOU'RE the doctor so you should know. ;)

I agree. In fact I thought it was impossible until a vet sent me this link.
http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/picrender.fcgi?artid=1790361&blobtype=pdf

Very rare, but I guess it did happen. If you read the article it appears to be more of a defect in the fibrous material--something that probably happened during the gestation period, then festered into a neurological condition.
There's a cheap reason why more equine disc herniations aren't diagnosed: If a horse does get a million in one disc herniation, it causes such lameness that the horse is put down before it's diagnosed--that is, if it occurs in the cervical spine, causing a Wobbler's type syndrome. Also, it costs a lot of money to perform the right scan. So based on this article, it might be (not sure) more prevalent than than we thought.

Patty Stiller
Mar. 8, 2009, 10:54 PM
Thanks for the link. I printed a copy and saved it for my files. It makes me wonder how many "wobblers" with unkown etiology may truly have disc problems.

grayarabpony
Mar. 8, 2009, 11:29 PM
Why is disc herniation so rare in horses?

LarkspurCO
Mar. 8, 2009, 11:32 PM
Very interesting.

What's that old adage... One man's troll is another man's treasure.

Cubs
Mar. 9, 2009, 06:45 AM
Why is disc herniation so rare in horses?

Because the center of their disc, the nucleus pulposus, is not liquid like a person's or a dog's is, and therefore cannot burst out of its confinements (the two adjacent vertebrae).

Dr. Kamen

SBF
Mar. 9, 2009, 09:02 AM
Because the center of their disc, the nucleus pulposus, is not liquid like a person's or a dog's is, and therefore cannot burst out of its confinements (the two adjacent vertebrae).

Dr. Kamen


Thanks for clarifying the point I was trying to make, Cubs. I sent you a PM.

Cubs
Mar. 9, 2009, 09:23 AM
Thanks for clarifying the point I was trying to make, Cubs. I sent you a PM.

I don't read PM's. I delete them before I open them.
And no, you didn't make that point. The article describes an exception--the disc herniated due to trauma, so it still can happen, rare, but it did happen, unless the veterinarian who published the study is lying.

Moderator 1
Mar. 9, 2009, 09:52 AM
Discuss this topic or don't, but everyone lay off of the personal commentary and troll alerts and insults in response. Readers can judge merit for themselves.

We've removed a bunch of posts.

Thanks,
Mod 1