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View Full Version : How many lbs. is a bucket of Alf. cubes?



Soldier06
Feb. 23, 2009, 09:59 PM
About how many lbs is an 8 quart (grain bucket) of alfalfa cubes (dry weight)? Also how many lbs do you start a horse on, horse is used to grass/alf. mix of hay and cubes are replacing some of his hay.

I was completely shocked when my seemingly small amount (covered the bottom of the bucket and a few didn't touch the bottom) blew up to what seemed like a lot of food.

deltawave
Feb. 23, 2009, 10:22 PM
Got a scale? :confused: If you want a rough estimate, grab a five pound bag of *something* (cat food?) and measure that against a bucket of the cubes, one item in each hand. It will get you in the ballpark. :)

Over the Hill
Feb. 23, 2009, 11:16 PM
I just happen to know that one full scoop of cubes in one of the bright colored square feed scoops is right about 2 pounds(dry).

Buglet
Feb. 24, 2009, 07:20 AM
Just a heads up - be very careful about the amount you feed. I used to give soaked alfalfa cubes to both of my horses. One horse would pick at it throughout the day. The other one would suck it all down right away. I gave them 1 2qt scoop dry and then soaked them for 1 hour before feeding. Once they expanded, it was almost a 1/2 bucket (20qt). That is a lot of food for a horse to eat at once. They eat regular hay a lot slower cause they have to chew it more, giving it time to digest. My mare did end up colicing and the vet said to only give her 5 soaked cubes at a time if she was going to eat it all at once.

CoolMeadows
Feb. 24, 2009, 07:52 AM
About how many lbs is an 8 quart (grain bucket) of alfalfa cubes (dry weight)? Also how many lbs do you start a horse on, horse is used to grass/alf. mix of hay and cubes are replacing some of his hay.

I was completely shocked when my seemingly small amount (covered the bottom of the bucket and a few didn't touch the bottom) blew up to what seemed like a lot of food.

I've weighed a 2 quart full scoop at 2.2 to 2.3lbs so you'd be close to 9 lbs dry weight in an 8 quart bucket. I'd start with 4 or 5 cubes soaked (they really do explode with water!).

I have a couple who eat 2 quarts (before soaking) of timothy/alfalfa cubes instead of grain but I wouldn't give them more than that at one time. It expands to 6 quarts wet and they take 45 mins - 1 hour to eat.

Altamont Sport Horses
Feb. 24, 2009, 09:28 AM
I believe my small buckets are 8 qts. I filled one up with my alfalfa cubes nearly to the top but not overflowing and weighed it just for you. It weighed 5 lbs. dry. I recommend buying a hanging fish scale so you can weigh your own feed, cubes, etc. They sell them at WalMart starting at $5 and go up from there. It is good for weighing feed as well as hay so you know you are giving the recommended amount for your horse.

I start with about 6-8 cubes of alfalfa cubes and slowly increase from there. I don't routinely feed cubes but this is what I have done previously.

WalkInTheWoods
Feb. 24, 2009, 11:04 AM
Why the guesstimate ? :confused: Scales are cheap. Big Cubes in a bucket may end up weighing less than smaller cubes that can "pack" in the bucket. Weighing will also take the guesswork out if you change brands of cubes.

equineartworks
Feb. 24, 2009, 11:27 AM
I defiantly second a cheap scale, you can find a cheap plastic one at most any discount store for around $5-10. Depending upon the size of the cubes (and some are small, big, super big) they take up more volume in the scoop and the weight difference can be HUGE. Since I feed a peanut I need to be really careful of the weights and I have been shocked at the differences.

bludejavu
Feb. 24, 2009, 11:35 AM
I've just recently discovered that there is a good bit of variance in the weight of different types of alfalfa cubes. I was buying the type that used Bentonite as a binder and those were weighing in at 10 cubes per pound. I switched to TSC's brand which are called Bio-cubes and they weigh in at 13 cubes per pound. I absolutely agree with the others who stated that you need to purchase a set of kitchen scales - I use mine with every kind of feed I buy to make sure I know what the true weight of the feed is that I want to give my horses. Weigh your feed in a plastic bag so that you will be totally accurate or you will need to remember to take into consideration the weight of the bucket or whatever else you might use to hold your cubes or feed when you weigh it.

equineartworks
Feb. 24, 2009, 11:38 AM
I've just recently discovered that there is a good bit of variance in the weight of different types of alfalfa cubes. I was buying the type that used Bentonite as a binder and those were weighing in at 10 cubes per pound. I switched to TSC's brand which are called Bio-cubes and they weigh in at 13 cubes per pound. I absolutely agree with the others who stated that you need to purchase a set of kitchen scales - I use mine with every kind of feed I buy to make sure I know what the true weight of the feed is that I want to give my horses. Weigh your feed in a plastic bag so that you will be totally accurate or you will need to remember to take into consideration the weight of the bucket or whatever else you might use to hold your cubes or feed when you weigh it.

We just got the timothy bio-cubes and WOW! huge difference in the weight compared to the pellets and the timothy/alfalfa. I was SO glad I weighed them, they "felt" only a bit heavier but it was almost double in weight.

Fairview Horse Center
Feb. 24, 2009, 11:39 AM
When I begin feeding alfalfa cubes, I start with about 2 lbs (before soaking) and go up from there, so maybe about 1/3 of a 8 QT bucket?. That would be like throwing them a small flake of alfalfa. Of course, if I can find alfalfa, I much perfer to feed it that way. MUCH cheaper too.

Fairview Horse Center
Feb. 24, 2009, 11:44 AM
I've just recently discovered that there is a good bit of variance in the weight of different types of alfalfa cubes.

I think you will find that the brands vary throughout the year. As they are making the cubes from hay that is at a different stage of aging, it will change. It goes from hard and tightly packed, to looking like it was made from older hay. Still, a 50 lb bag of cubes should still weigh 50 lbs. So if you divide up a new bag, you can tell the weight of a portion without a scale.

You can always take a ziplock bag to the local post office. They just love to weigh grain. :winkgrin: <ask me how I know> It breaks up their day. :lol: :lol:

Soldier06
Feb. 24, 2009, 02:52 PM
Thank you for all the replies! Seems like the general consensus is 1lb-1quart (give or take). Scale is coming out today, this was to figure out about how much I had fed him last night, since that seemed a lot more than it actually was (I panicked!) I gave him enough to cover the bottom of the 8 quart bucket 2x so like 1/4-1/3 of a bucket, but it blew up to A LOT. :lol:

He is a very slow eater with it, because a) he doesn't particularly love it and b) he has a fractured tooth.

ETA-They are Purina cubes, about 2 inches long, 1 inch wide, fairly compact (they are hard to break into little "layers")