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View Full Version : Adding overhangs to existing barn?



mkevent
Feb. 23, 2009, 03:57 PM
I'd like to add 8' overhangs to both sides of my center aisle barn(34'X42"). The side wall of the barn is 10' high and I was hoping to add the overhangs under the gutters. My roof pitch is 4/12 and I have a shingled roof. I know I can buy a "kit" to add to both sides of the barn for approx $5,200.00 but DH thinks we could do it ourselves for less. Any suggestions on how to find plans/materials list for this? I've searched online and haven't been too successful. I'm not sure if I should just "suck it up" and buy the kit(includes all materials and delivery) or try and do it ourselves-since I'm on a limited budget, I'd like to save $$ where I can. I appreciate the help!

rainechyldes
Feb. 23, 2009, 04:25 PM
I can't help you with plans, but I'm thinking, wouldn't 8 feet make the edge of the overhang quite low by the time it got all the way out there, off a 10 feet original height?

I'm trying to look at ours and remember the measurements, ha!
we did the same thing, but our side wall hieght was about 16ft up I think. I can go measure it when I go feed em lunch.

what we did was dig down(4 ft I seem to recall), and use those round cement foundation pillars(10 feet apart and 10 feet out from the barn wall), then used 4X4s as uprights on top of them. Then 2x10s for the bracing, which were..16 inches apart I believe. Then tin sheeting as roofing material, to match the orginal roofing on the barn main itself.

We had to have a fairly steep pitch on the overhang though, due to the high volume of snow here.

mkevent
Feb. 23, 2009, 04:38 PM
That was my worry, too. I think I could do slightly less angle and the height would be almost 7' at the end. The other option would be to do a 6' overhang but that seems to be just a little smaller space than I was envisioning. My overhangs would basically be a shelter in case of a storm and for mud control/extra shade. I should point out that each stall has a private paddock/pasture, so essentially there wouldn't be multiple horses fighting for the overhang space, so maybe 6' would be plenty. All this math is hurting my brain...

birdsong
Feb. 23, 2009, 04:41 PM
I did it on one side and yes the edge of my overhang became very low...not tall enough for the horse to pass underneath...but I ran a wooden fence along that edge and use the ends to come and go.

You CAN do it yourself...Home Depot has all the stuff.

deltawave
Feb. 23, 2009, 04:43 PM
The guy who built my barn added on a 10' x 36' overhang off my barn for about $3K, soup to nuts, labor included. I'd ask a local pole barn contractor for a quote--this is an easy, one-day job for them and they may be hurting for work and willing to deal this time of year and with things the way they are in general.

rainechyldes
Feb. 23, 2009, 04:43 PM
That was my worry, too. I think I could do slightly less angle and the height would be almost 7' at the end. The other option would be to do a 6' overhang but that seems to be just a little smaller space than I was envisioning. My overhangs would basically be a shelter in case of a storm and for mud control/extra shade. I should point out that each stall has a private paddock/pasture, so essentially there wouldn't be multiple horses fighting for the overhang space, so maybe 6' would be plenty. All this math is hurting my brain...

That's what our overhang is for to mainly, although I also cut the barn main wall, and put in feeding mangers, so they get their hay fed there as well.

Ours is.. 35 feet long, with 3 horses who have access to it, as all the other horses are in other pastures. They don't seem to fuss overly - although the low man on the totem pole normally gets chased out after meal time, but since there is another shelter in that pasture, he stands in the other and the 2 bullies hog the overhang:)

Calvincrowe
Feb. 23, 2009, 04:51 PM
We retrofitted our pole barn with a 12 x 48 foot overhang, 16 feet down to 12 feet (not sure what that pitch would be... sorry), but if you are starting yours at 10 feet, the end pitch would be so low, that you couldn't park a tractor or put horses under it comfortably, I don't think--but I'm no builder! If your pitch were pretty shallow, then you might get away with it. You can mock up the height with string, to get an idea. A 6 foot overhang isn't really useful--too small. Mine use up all 12 feet--a horse is more than 6 feet long, and most like to stand head out.

Now, we did build ours ourselves. We used 6 x 6 treated posts, set in concrete. 2 x 6 for frame, bolted into the 6 x 6 beams in the barn (cut thru the metal to insert them). Really, the only tools needed were a post hole digger, shovel, electric drill/bits, Saws-all, circular saw, and fasteners. We ordered our metal and picked up all the wood/metal ourselves. 4 x 4 seemed pretty "wimpy" when faced with 1500 lb horses.

OneDaySoon
Feb. 23, 2009, 05:03 PM
We built ours as well but I do recall a lot of short tempers over the math and angles...and I think one of the guys ended up playing golf instead!!!! If I did it again, I would have a team meeting and agree on some tricks of the building trade on how to line things up quickly and effectively.

Our's is 10' x 48' and I love it. I would recommend closing in the shallow end and perhaps using that area for hay/feed, tack lockers...and to keep out the seasonal elements. The wind blows through our overhang and we were required to install hurricane brackets by the building inspector. However I like that I can drive a truck/tractor from one end to the other and drop off bedding supplies...I also installed a gate at one end which connects directly to a small paddock.

Tom King
Feb. 23, 2009, 05:44 PM
Lumber is pretty cheap right now. The determining factor for width is height at the edge and 4 1/2 is a fairly low slope anyway but you might be able to get by with less it you use metal roofing. I'd go as wide as you can and live with the low end. It doesn't take much more labor to put up 12' rafters than 6'.

I'd just take the fascia off the barn and nail the rafters beside the existing ones on the inside setting them on top of the band holding the current ones. Check the sizing of the current band though as it may need to be doubled for the extra load.

You might even be able to get a bit more width by doing the slope change a bit up on the existing roof.

Send me a picture. I built stuff for a living for 35 years.

KSAQHA
Feb. 25, 2009, 07:58 AM
Timely subject as I've been contemplating the same thing.

Do you use any sort of footing underneath? Are gutters a good idea?

Would anyone be able to post a picture, please?

mkevent
Feb. 25, 2009, 08:50 AM
Thanks for all the replies!
Tom- I'll send you a picture as soon as my computer gurus can help me post it (I'm terrible with computer skills). And thanks so much for the offer to help!

deltawave
Feb. 25, 2009, 09:00 AM
Gutters, LORD yes. Definitely gutters. :yes: