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View Full Version : Some people just make you roll your eyes...



Guin
Jan. 21, 2009, 06:44 AM
I was walking Shadow (my big Golden retriever/Collie) and Tribble (my registered Pem) this weekend and met a couple who were out with their dog. It was a cute, fuzzy medium-sized brown dog with sort of a shepherd-looking face and ears, and a bobbed tail. I asked them if they knew what mix their dog was. "Oh, Corgi and Shepherd." Then the woman looked RIGHT AT TRIBBLE, who is the epitome of a Pembroke (champions on both bloodlines) and said, "Oh, what kind of dog is that?" Uh.....a CORGI!!!

"Oh! She must hunt all the mice and rodents just like Fluffy. That's the Corgi in her!" Uh.....NO. Corgis are HERDING DOGS, NOT terriers!

You would think if you're convinced that your dog is part Corgi or whatever, that you'd go look up the breed and see what it is they actually DO. :rolleyes:

slc2
Jan. 21, 2009, 07:04 AM
I agree that that is ABSOLUTELY TERRIBLE! They should be shot!

No I don't, actually. Not everyone knows everything about dogs. Who cares. It's normal to hear a lot of misinformation about dogs all the time.

Most crossbred dogs are mixes of the commonest breeds, especially the ones that tend to run around loose and have ah...'unprotected sex'. Corgis are only common in horsey circles. A bob tail dog, if created in the city or suburbs, is more likely to be a retriever rottweiler cross, or a heeler sheltie cross would be a rare possibility. Don't think exotic, rare breeds; the commonest breeds can easily combine to produce a variety of traits. Think common breeds, common in the area where he was whelped.

Aside from that, actually, you may not know quite as much as you think, every single corgi I've ever met is death on mice, if they weren't so fat they couldn't move. From barkbytes, on a widely accepted theory about corgis:

"The dog had to be multi-purpose. Bird hunter, :):):)ratter:):):), domestic duck and geese herding, cattle or sheep herding, sometimes even having to hunt his own food for dinner,"

Dogs of a given breed to not spend their entire lives evincing only one behavior. MOST herding breeds are also very good at doing a great many other things. My collie in addition to herding, does obedience, agility, nursing home visits, and LURE COURSING. And NO, he is NOT a greyhound! (see below).

My collie is also death on mice.

Yes, a collie is a herding dog.

Quelle surprise!

And MICE are exactly the same as tiny sheep, except they are hors d'ouvres!

We must frequently pry him out of the space between the sliding stall doors, where he is SURE there is a mouse. Another gravely exciting possibility is the pile of cavalletti poles. If he is ordered not to scramble about in them, he must ATTEND to them, staring motionless with head c0cked. He actually can WILL those mice to run out and jump into his mouth!

There is also the space between the hay bales. These areas are mined with such astuteness and persistence that it cannot possibly be imagined. I frequently am treated to a horse that leaps forward because there is a collie trying to climb in between the kickboards and the wall. Then there is the trailer. The garage, and thankfully, occasionally the kitchen, though the house in general receives far less attention.

It is rather wondrous to see him leaping along in gigantic bounds in the tall grass, trying to bounce the mice into the air where they can be snatched in mid air!

Now let me see....what other dog does that....HMMMM....Oh I know! My friend's corgi!

He constantly has Mouse Breath, and some of the mice are stored away til good and ripe and then brought into the house as 'Gifts'. They may be stashed under a strategic Pile of Leaves to rot a bit and then chucked down in one swallow, YUM! Leaf raking is such a traumatic time....'where are my mice! I left them here to age like a fine wine!'

My smooth collie has been declared everything from a wolf cross to a poodle to a greyhound to 'some other kind of collie'. Some woman at the park with two labs on a rope insisted he is 'a crossbred' of a collie and 'something that causes spots'. Spaghetti sauce? Blueberries?:lol:

Now when people say, 'What kind of dog is he?' I reply so gently, 'What kind of dog do you WANT him to be?'

As a dog owner one has to relax and learn to enjoy these moments instead of being H&M.

The BEST moment was when we attended a pancake breakfast (collies also are widely known for their love of pancakes) for the local fire station. A gigantic fireman at one point wound up parked in front of our collie, staring at him intently.

Our smoothie has some very alarming markings on his face, where the color abruptly changes right down the middle of his muzzle, the blacker side of his face has a white mottled ear, and the lighter side of his face has an almost entirely black ear. He looks like a painting by Marcel duChamp.

I asked very gently what he was looking at, and he said 'I AM ADMIRING THE PERFECT SYMMETRY OF HIS MUZZLE'.

Why of COURSE you are!

regeventer
Jan. 21, 2009, 07:14 AM
Amen slc2 - most crossbreds are the most common breeds running around loose.

I have to laugh when a client, who found a cat who happens to be large and long haired, tells me they think the cat is part Norwegian Forest Cat. Yeah, I see alot of those running around feral in Western MD!!!:lol:

slc2
Jan. 21, 2009, 07:29 AM
It's much more like to be a Fat Cat. That is a VERY special breed of cat. When you feed them alot, the metamorphosize into a Fat Cat.

regeventer
Jan. 21, 2009, 07:41 AM
Fat Cat - definition - cute, can wile any human with a certain look and purring, kneading dough with front paws - once said human is caught, unlimited access to food - an act of affection on the humans' part - and said stray turns into Fat Cat and is set for life!:lol:

cloudyandcallie
Jan. 21, 2009, 07:47 AM
They are not mutts, they are multicultural.

My purebred Aussies and yellow lab have always been purchased, but the multicultural dogs and cats I've scraped off the road and found in pounds are just as special.

Let the people love their "part corgi." City folks in St. Louis asked me more than once if my Aussie puppy was a "bear cub.":lol: when there weren't many Aussies around.

One of the best dogs I ever had was Chadwick, a part white German Sheperd-looking dog with big brown eyes and blond fur whom I found at a murder scene when he was a puppy. I called him a "Chinook" and my neighbors thought he was a great (and beautiful) dog. Had they known his origin, he might have not been thought of so highly.

Bluey
Jan. 21, 2009, 07:50 AM
Remember that female dogs can have litters sired by different males, where not all puppies are from the same breed on the father's side.

So, unless you are very sure who a female was bred to and that it was ONLY that male, most mixed dogs are just that, mixed and you can't really be sure what all may be in the mix.

We bred dogs by breeds so we can have a fairly good idea of what we will get in the puppies, but even there you can have surprises from genes way back when.:yes:

In dogs of unkown breeding, all bets are off.
The AKC will admit neutered dogs for performance shows like obedience and agility if they resemble closely any one breed and most such dogs do resemble some breed.
Because of that similarity, many dogs get their AKC ILP number and can show.
Our dog club has several dogs that can show under those rules, but there have been a few that were so mixed you could not tell what breed they resembled, so could not be accepted.

Sounds like that one dog in the OP post was one such.
All dogs are neat dogs, no matter what breed or cross, but naming the breeds of dogs up on the mix is a guess, who knows what is there and that is fine.:)

trubandloki
Jan. 21, 2009, 08:36 AM
I figure as long as people are taking good care of their mutt there is no reason to roll my eyes at them if they have not studied the entire history of the breeds that might be contained in it.

And though I usually have a pretty good idea of what breed people's dogs are when they bring them into obedience class I usually ask them anyway. I am sometimes very shocked. If nothing else it is a good conversation starter.

Jealoushe
Jan. 21, 2009, 09:30 AM
I figure as long as people are taking good care of their mutt there is no reason to roll my eyes at them if they have not studied the entire history of the breeds that might be contained in it.

And though I usually have a pretty good idea of what breed people's dogs are when they bring them into obedience class I usually ask them anyway. I am sometimes very shocked. If nothing else it is a good conversation starter.

Most definitly

JSwan
Jan. 21, 2009, 09:30 AM
I once had an AKC Basset Hound named Giuseppe. He was almost solid red; just a little bit of white. (any hound color is acceptable for this breed.)


The first time I took him to the vet she looked at him and said.... drum roll please.....



"Oh look, a Standard Dachshund."


I guess someone needs to graduate at the bottom of the class......






You would think if you're convinced that your dog is part Corgi or whatever, that you'd go look up the breed and see what it is they actually DO. :rolleyes:

Bluey
Jan. 21, 2009, 09:38 AM
I figure as long as people are taking good care of their mutt there is no reason to roll my eyes at them if they have not studied the entire history of the breeds that might be contained in it.

And though I usually have a pretty good idea of what breed people's dogs are when they bring them into obedience class I usually ask them anyway. I am sometimes very shocked. If nothing else it is a good conversation starter.

The first time someone brought a miniature aussie to dog class I was puzzled, asked if it was a sheltie, thinking sheltie cross and was huffily informed it was the "new aussies".
I learned to ask first, not offer an opinion on any dog's breed.:D

pj
Jan. 21, 2009, 10:57 AM
Actually their dog could have Corgi in it and you never know it. I have a little half JC half Pom and nobody would EVER guess in a million years there was a drop of Pom in this dog. He looks like a short coated brown dog...that's all. If you go over him inch by inch you will see that he has the Pom tail with short hair. We know for a fact that his breeding is what it is as his parents are my Daughter's house dogs. The female got out of "her" room when she was in heat and the mating was discovered while it was taking place. Lots of times you cannot tell a dogs breeding by looking at it.
Years ago I had a Poodle x Scottie. When we were moving here she got out and bred with a very heavy boned Beagle. She had four pups, two looked exactly like solid black Beagles, two looked like purebred Scottie pups. The people who took the two "Scottie" pups told me that their Vet argued with them that these pups HAD to be purebred. Nobody would ever have believed these puppies had Beagle in them. :)

birdsong
Jan. 21, 2009, 11:06 AM
SLC - LOVED IT!!!! We need a picture of this amazing mixed up mouser of yours....

Cielo Azure
Jan. 21, 2009, 11:13 AM
The first time someone brought a miniature aussie to dog class I was puzzled, asked if it was a sheltie, thinking sheltie cross and was huffily informed it was the "new aussies".
I learned to ask first, not offer an opinion on any dog's breed.:D

Actually, ASCA is pretty sure that they are not the "new" aussies. They take great exception to using the name Aussie in conjunction with minis and toys. Unfortunately, they never TM or copyrighted the name, so they are SOL. But they are doing what they can to educate the public. Minis and toys do not meet the breed standard, they can not be dual registered and they are NOT Aussies. In fact, most people agree that the Toys, in particular are not purebred dogs. But even many of the minis clearly are not purebred Aussies either.

chestnutmarebeware
Jan. 21, 2009, 11:15 AM
I also have two registered corgis from show lines, and they definitely have the hunting instinct. My male had to be banned from the barn because he would not only chase the chickens, but pounce on them and attempt to dispatch them with a bite to the neck. :eek: The female just eats random piles of horse manure and gets exceptionally offensive breath, along with digestive upset.

Look at these faces! Do they look like killers to you?

http://s127.photobucket.com/albums/p122/kmclaughlin21/?action=view&current=Snaffles-and-Andy.jpg

twofatponies
Jan. 21, 2009, 11:20 AM
My biggest dog related eye roll - a woman at a barn I used to board at who showed up one day with her new puppy - a mastiff type - and proceeded to warn us to be very careful if we passed by her property because this was a big scary aggressive breed, and she couldn't be responsible if something happened. Meanwhile the "scary" puppy was blathering around, wagging his tail, and happily drooling on everyone who walked by. Big eyeroll.

Cielo Azure
Jan. 21, 2009, 11:21 AM
I was walking Shadow (my big Golden retriever/Collie) and Tribble (my registered Pem) this weekend and met a couple who were out with their dog. It was a cute, fuzzy medium-sized brown dog with sort of a shepherd-looking face and ears, and a bobbed tail. I asked them if they knew what mix their dog was. "Oh, Corgi and Shepherd." Then the woman looked RIGHT AT TRIBBLE, who is the epitome of a Pembroke (champions on both bloodlines) and said, "Oh, what kind of dog is that?" Uh.....a CORGI!!!

"Oh! She must hunt all the mice and rodents just like Fluffy. That's the Corgi in her!" Uh.....NO. Corgis are HERDING DOGS, NOT terriers!

You would think if you're convinced that your dog is part Corgi or whatever, that you'd go look up the breed and see what it is they actually DO. :rolleyes:

Roll eyes:
Look up history corgi hunting or corgi rats hunting on google.
They were developed, in part to be farm dogs and hunting rodents was part of that. They also were developed from other breeds of dogs that were hunting dogs.

"History:
The Pembroke was probably developed in Wales from progenitors brought to 12th century Pembrokeshire, Wales, by Flemish weavers. Welsh Corgis were developed to herd cattle, guard the farm and hunt rats and other small animals."
http://www.dog-breed-facts.com/Breeds/pembroke-welsh-corgi.html

From the Pembroke Welsh Corgi Club of America, Inc.
"The Corgi in Britain was primarily a drover of the Welsh cattle, but was also used as a guardian of the farmyard against invasion by any type of vermin."
http://www.pembrokecorgi.org/PE_Herding.html

I used to own Corgis, while having a farm. They most certainly do love to hunt rats and other small animals! They most definitely have those genes!

Bluey
Jan. 21, 2009, 04:22 PM
Actually, ASCA is pretty sure that they are not the "new" aussies. They take great exception to using the name Aussie in conjunction with minis and toys. Unfortunately, they never TM or copyrighted the name, so they are SOL. But they are doing what they can to educate the public. Minis and toys do not meet the breed standard, they can not be dual registered and they are NOT Aussies. In fact, most people agree that the Toys, in particular are not purebred dogs. But even many of the minis clearly are not purebred Aussies either.

I know, but I have seen some showing as aussies with their ILP, so, I guess that in the pictures presented for registration, they did look enough like an aussie to be called that.:p

I have a friend with one and he is a really neat dog and he is a good aussie type, just 1/3 the regular size.

My own old aussie was from old herding lines and not bobtailed or with the heavy coat and thickness of today's aussies, that are a little too extreme in type, compared with the old, true working ones.

I guess that some breeds have been evolving also.:)

Auventera Two
Jan. 21, 2009, 04:35 PM
A bob tail dog, if created in the city or suburbs, is more likely to be a retriever rottweiler cross,

Hu? :confused: Rotties have artificially docked tails, leaving only one or two vertabrae. They are not born "bobbed."

:lol:

slc2
Jan. 21, 2009, 08:17 PM
if they're not docked they have a relatively thick, medium length tail. I'll ask my friend if she docked her lab-rottie cross. I could have misunderstood her, I thought she said something about rottie crosses occasionally coming out tailless. There are some 'cur dogs' around in the country here with naturally short tails.

EqTrainer
Jan. 21, 2009, 08:51 PM
I am all about mutt dogs being the most common breeds.

However..

I got a puppy last year. He looked like either 1) a border collie cross or 2) a fiest terrier cross. He was small, we thought he was 12 or so weeks old. White w/the classic border collie head, white body, a black spot right where the Frontline goes and one right in front of his tail. Short hair.

First shock: He was only four weeks old.
Second shock: He began to grow very long, long hair.
Third shock: He began to get spots.
Fourth shock: He grew very quickly. Very, very quickly!

When I took him to get neutered, the vet told me he thinks he is part Pyraneese (sp?). Seems that one of our country "neighbors" had *quite* a few of them who wandered off over the years, so it's not totally insane to think he might be. The hair was the giveway to him, he claims they have a certain type of hair and this dog has it.

He is now almost a year old, give or take a few weeks and he weighs 90 lbs. He is now very long haired and covered in black spots. He is beautiful! And the sweetest, calmest, mellowest dog I have ever had. He's a keeper. But what a SHOCK!

JSwan
Jan. 21, 2009, 09:00 PM
EqTrainer - is this the puppy that took off after those hunting dogs? Is he staying home now?

A friend of mine adopted what she thought was a rottie mix. Nice, personable puppy that fit right in and got along with the other animals in the house.

And it grew.

And grew.

And grew.

I finally met the dog many months later. The thing is huge and hairy and wants to sit on your lap.

It's a Newfoundland. When she lays down she looks like a bear skin rug, only longer hair.

GREAT family or farm dog! (just don't let it get near water);)

EqTrainer
Jan. 21, 2009, 09:36 PM
It is! I returned him to his early puppyhood by keeping him on leash w/me for a few days and then keeping him up when I left. So far, so good. I figure by next season he will be so mellow that chasing anything will be of the question.

Funny about the Newfie! I can imagine how shocked they are.. I am..

vacation1
Jan. 22, 2009, 01:53 PM
Most crossbred dogs are mixes of the commonest breeds, especially the ones that tend to run around loose and have ah...'unprotected sex'.

True for many places, but here in NJ, you see some very odd breeds in shelters and I would not be shocked at any mix. Newly introduced animals (human and dog) tend to arrive here first; and there are a lot of very wealthy communities filled with newly upper-middle-class people who like to have the only Antiguan Boarhound in the nation as their pet. And, of course, people who choose dogs to promote their own specialness are the ones who more easily let them go to a shelter when times get tight. I've seen Pharoah Hounds, Clumber Spaniels, and Bouvier des Flandres in shelters here. And my first dog was a Bearded Collie from a shelter. The vast majority of unwanted dogs here are pit bulls, labs, rottweilers and beagles, of course, but it's common for even the county shelter in a poor town to turn up a refugee from the dustier pages of the AKC breed book.

slc2
Jan. 22, 2009, 06:29 PM
Perhaps in one part of NJ....in the rest of the world, the abandoned dogs are by and large, the most populous breeds.

cloudyandcallie
Jan. 22, 2009, 06:48 PM
Actually, ASCA is pretty sure that they are not the "new" aussies. They take great exception to using the name Aussie in conjunction with minis and toys. Unfortunately, they never TM or copyrighted the name, so they are SOL. But they are doing what they can to educate the public. Minis and toys do not meet the breed standard, they can not be dual registered and they are NOT Aussies. In fact, most people agree that the Toys, in particular are not purebred dogs. But even many of the minis clearly are not purebred Aussies either.

Well ASCA should have fought harder to keep our Aussies from being recognized by AKC. It's a wonder we don't have "aussie poos" or whatever.
I liked it better when our Aussies were bred less for that white ruff and more for their herding abilities, thank the Hartnagles at Las Rocosa.

But the folks who have the part corgi can get DNA testing now to see just what kind of dog they do have.

Cielo Azure
Jan. 22, 2009, 08:48 PM
Well ASCA should have fought harder to keep our Aussies from being recognized by AKC. It's a wonder we don't have "aussie poos" or whatever.
I liked it better when our Aussies were bred less for that white ruff and more for their herding abilities, thank the Hartnagles at Las Rocosa.

But the folks who have the part corgi can get DNA testing now to see just what kind of dog they do have.

Membership overwhemlingly voted down joining AKC. ASCA never supported it and still doesn't. 92 assholes formed their own club (the Australian Shepherd Association) and petitioned AKC to allow Aussies to be recognized, with the Australian Shepherd Association as the parent club (with all 92 members). There wasn't a damm thing ASCA could do. Don't blame ASCA.

AKC has not recognized the minis or toys either (yet).

As to white ruff and show lines, I am with you 100%. Bleh. It is ruining the breed.

Bluey
Jan. 22, 2009, 09:07 PM
Membership overwhemlingly voted down joining AKC. ASCA never supported it and still doesn't. 92 assholes formed their own club (the Australian Shepherd Association) and petitioned AKC to allow Aussies to be recognized, with the Australian Shepherd Association as the parent club (with all 92 members). There wasn't a damm thing ASCA could do. Don't blame ASCA.

AKC has not recognized the minis or toys either (yet).

As to white ruff and show lines, I am with you 100%. Bleh. It is ruining the breed.

The same happened with some terriers and the border collies.
So what, to each their own.
To the AKC people with aussies, they have some really neat dogs, as you can see winning in international agility competitions.

We need to remember than breeds are ultimately a genetic bottleneck, be it AKC, ASCA or any other, so diversity is in all dog's advantage, as long as we can keep some type and inherited abilities for the tasks they were bred for and to distinguish breeds from each other.

This is the USA, if some want something, they can form their own association and get it and many do.:)

dalpal
Jan. 22, 2009, 10:19 PM
This thread reminds me of my first dalmatian. He was stocky for a dalmatian, but nevertheless, a dalmatian. I could understand people thinking he was crossed with a lab.....but when people would ask.."What kind of dog is that." :confused: It was hard not to laugh. :lol: You can see him guarding my filly when she was a yearling in this picture. http://s222.photobucket.com/albums/dd129/grayboomerang/Pets-Diva%20at%202/?action=view&current=eb72.jpg Pretty obvious that he's a dalmatian.

I told my husband that the response should be....He is a rare, imported, European breed called a Holstein (he was rather chunky). :D

Go Fish
Jan. 23, 2009, 02:27 AM
I was walking Shadow (my big Golden retriever/Collie) and Tribble (my registered Pem) this weekend and met a couple who were out with their dog. It was a cute, fuzzy medium-sized brown dog with sort of a shepherd-looking face and ears, and a bobbed tail. I asked them if they knew what mix their dog was. "Oh, Corgi and Shepherd." Then the woman looked RIGHT AT TRIBBLE, who is the epitome of a Pembroke (champions on both bloodlines) and said, "Oh, what kind of dog is that?" Uh.....a CORGI!!!

"Oh! She must hunt all the mice and rodents just like Fluffy. That's the Corgi in her!" Uh.....NO. Corgis are HERDING DOGS, NOT terriers!

You would think if you're convinced that your dog is part Corgi or whatever, that you'd go look up the breed and see what it is they actually DO. :rolleyes:

Uhhh...I think it's YOU who needs an education on Corgis. Yes, they are cattle herding dogs. But they're ratters, too. My male dog runs down and kills more rats combined than either the Jack or the cats at the barn. :yes:

equinelaw
Jan. 23, 2009, 03:27 AM
Huh. Closely related to the Spitz. They drove, herd, and eat rats. They also were used to run wheels on machines IIRC. I had no idea this was the source of tail docking:eek:

http://www.pembrokecorgi.org/art_history_ssh.html

Cute dogs.:)

smokygirl
Jan. 23, 2009, 05:32 AM
I kind of agree with you, in some ways. I have had rotties, and worked in rottie rescue for awhile. I used some for herding, some for carting (where they pull... a cart), and even rehomed some for herding, search and rescue and as therapy dogs. I had people who would come up to me and tell me about their rottie.. and they would be amazed at what these dogs were doing.. ummm. Rotties were descended from "butcher dogs" (dogs that drove cattle to the butchers and then brought the money home tied around their neck.. not many people will try to take the money from around a rotties neck :)). I mean, people who've never met one, I could understand (sort of) thinking they are all mean and gruff, especially if they've only seen one in Schutzhund. But people who own them should know how smart and wonderful they are :)