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View Full Version : Now I HAVE seen it all!!!!!



BEARCAT
Jan. 15, 2009, 12:53 PM
http://www.shakenfork.com/


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...the $200 manure fork!!

Oh, no, "manually shake the fork!!" That would be the death of me!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZBuDwOkRfQs

I find it hilarious that the video actually makes it look like it takes LONGER with the power fork!

MunchkinsMom
Jan. 15, 2009, 02:25 PM
Interesting concept :lol:, but not the pricetag!

Right up there with the one that would use air to blow off the shavings (can't recall the price on that one). I was going to just tape a hair dryer to my pitchfork to see if it would work or not. Then the thought of dragging the cords around stopped me in my tracks.

Bluey
Jan. 15, 2009, 02:45 PM
Interesting concept :lol:, but not the pricetag!

Right up there with the one that would use air to blow off the shavings (can't recall the price on that one). I was going to just tape a hair dryer to my pitchfork to see if it would work or not. Then the thought of dragging the cords around stopped me in my tracks.

How about a battery run hair dryer?:D

kellyb
Jan. 15, 2009, 03:09 PM
:lol: looks like it would take twice as long. Plus, is the motor going to hold up when I accidentally whack the door frame with it instead of making it to the wheelbarrow???

Ruby G. Weber
Jan. 15, 2009, 04:15 PM
Totally ridiculous!

trubandloki
Jan. 15, 2009, 04:23 PM
I could not watch the whole video. But I have to laugh. Of course he needs some special gadget to shake the shavings out, he very clearly does not have the manual shake down very well.

Murphy's Mom
Jan. 15, 2009, 05:17 PM
I sent the link to a friend of mine. This was her reply. :D

"Ya know, if they're going to waste time making a video to sell a product, they should have at least had some buff stable boy without a shirt on! LOL"

strawberry roan
Jan. 15, 2009, 08:35 PM
What a great idea!! I've just ordered 2!! Not. :lol: Agree--now I have seen it all.

equinelaw
Jan. 15, 2009, 08:52 PM
Can you imagine just standing there listening to all that noise and watching the fork shake?

Plus there are "manure balls" and chips flying out of that thing anyway.

Cripes. Who would buy that thing:confused:

I would pay $200 for a perfectly balanced engraved truly unbreakable lightweight fork. Perhaps with cushy soft grips and ideally spaced times that can be adjusted for shaving, sawdust or straw.:)

Bryarpatch
Jan. 16, 2009, 10:30 AM
Amen EquineLaw.

jn4jenny
Jan. 16, 2009, 11:32 AM
*I* wouldn't buy it, but I actually think it's a very clever marketing idea. Someone with a broken wrist/arm, or very bad arthritis, or maybe even shoulder problems might think this is useful.

TrueColours
Jan. 17, 2009, 12:58 PM
I was part of a test group with this product and the next fork down - the ergonomically balanced and designed fork that had built in shock absorbers that allowed the tines to lay flat on the ground when mucking out

I LOVED the non shake fork and found it miles better than anything else available out in the marketplace. It felt better, it was less tiring on your arms and everything just felt right and so much more user friendly than a regular fork

The Shake N Fork I never quite got the hang of pushing the button to allow the fork to do the shaking - I just instinctively shook the fork on my own. The shaking speed is variable as well, so I also found that I pushed the button too hard and either manure balls went flying everywhere or the wetter manure that wasnt formed into hard balls, broke apart and made more of a mess to clean up. Apparently this fork works far better for someone who has never mucked a stall before and doesnt have preconceived ideas as to how a manure fork needs to be used. That I would believe as the people that used it that had never mucked a stall before had better luck with it than I did ... :)

I had a lot of interest for these up here in Canada to be very honest, from people that had tried the Shake N Fork out and loved it and the $200.00+ price tag on it didnt deter them in the slightest

I dont know if I would pay it myself, but I would have had no hesitation in paying the $60.00 - $70.00 for the other fork as it was far superior, IMO, to anything available in the market right now

Shake N Fork is also coming out with a cheaper and lighter version of the Shake N Fork with a motor that doesnt have the same variable speed range and I think THAT one may well be the ticket and the one that more of the horse people find easier to use ...

Huntertwo
Jan. 17, 2009, 01:11 PM
There was a booth at the Equine Affaire demonstrating that thing...lol

And the demonstration had plastic poop balls.

I couldn't even imagine how long it would take to clean an entire stall, never mind an entire barn waiting for that device to shake off with every single pitch fork full of bedding. :eek:

irishcas
Jan. 17, 2009, 01:23 PM
Apparently this fork works far better for someone who has never mucked a stall before and doesnt have preconceived ideas as to how a manure fork needs to be used.

I hope someone who owns a horse has first learned how to muck :)

Since we are on wishlists, I'd like a machine that will:

1. open bags of grain and dump them into appropriate bins
2. every day, measure out grains into appropriate feed buckets and add all necessary supplements
3. Bring horses from pastures to stalls, turn them back out.
4. Sift thru every stall suck up manure and soiled bedding, leaving behind shavings.
5. sweep floor everynight
6. every week go out into pasture and vacuum up all the piles of manure
7. Oh and do my dishes and vacuum my floors too.

Crap, thats me! I guess I guess I could get rid of all the horses, but then I'd need to go see a shrink every day of the week, hmmmmm, which is more expensive. I'm gonna say the shrink and stick to the damn manual labor.

Regards,

Ghazzu
Jan. 17, 2009, 01:32 PM
Wouldn't it be cheaper to merely duct tape a vibrator to the handle of a regular pitchfork?

Huntertwo
Jan. 17, 2009, 01:33 PM
Wouldn't it be cheaper to merely duct tape a vibrator to the handle of a regular pitchfork?

If you have a one big enough....;) lol

TrueColours
Jan. 17, 2009, 01:44 PM
Wouldn't it be cheaper to merely duct tape a vibrator to the handle of a regular pitchfork?


And I guess if said vibrator has no further use anymore, yeah - I guess you could stick one on there and maybe make a little covering for it in case any small kiddies come into your barn and you dont want to explain what that vibrating appendage is on the end of your pitchfork! ;)

The Shake A Fork is actually technologically a brilliant piece of engineering ... :) ... and a huge amount of thought has gone into both motors that are in use on the unit itself, and the composition of the fork tines, the shock absorption units, the balance of the fork - everything. It is not a mass produced item churned out in the Far East where cost is the most important factor and quality falls by the wayside. Even now, they are working to refine and change and improve the units until they are 100% "right"

Hats off to them. It wont appeal to everyone the same way everyone doesnt drive an Audi or a Mercedes but for those that do want a quality product that simply works better than anything else out there, it definately fits the bill ... :)

merrygoround
Jan. 17, 2009, 02:16 PM
I could not watch the whole video. But I have to laugh. Of course he needs some special gadget to shake the shavings out, he very clearly does not have the manual shake down very well.

I vote for a different demonstrator, the buff young man would do.:)

My carpal tunnels would love it! :yes:

unbridledoaks
Jan. 17, 2009, 09:27 PM
For that price.... Wow.... I am always entertained by what comes out each year.... LOL!

thatmoody
Jan. 17, 2009, 10:22 PM
I love how, during the demonstration, a big ole pucky goes flying off along with the shavings.

jump4it
Jan. 20, 2009, 01:53 AM
Interesting concpet but for that price I want a pitchfork that would clean the stall by itself while I drank my coffee and supervised.

Rancherff
Jan. 25, 2009, 12:25 AM
Wow, you gals are a tough crowd! Just kidding, I'm glad to see the feedback, it helps me to refine the forks and also not get discouraged by the tremendous uphill effort it takes to introduce a new product to the equine industry.
Thank you to True Colours Farm for their invaluable input and encouragement. Of all the posts here, hers was the only one that actually has used the product in person. I really take her comments to heart. She is correct that if you are an expert cleaner it takes some unlearning to NOT bump the shavings when you pick them up, and just let the fork do the work. (It is like having a chainsaw and not starting the motor,doing the shakey thing with a motorized fork is not really very productive;). Readers of this forum are avid horse persons and this is the reason that I wrote the offer on another thread to get these into more qualified barns! http://www.chronicleforums.com/Forum/showthread.php?t=185616

I'm going to respond to a couple of the comments;


"Ya know, if they're going to waste time making a video to sell a product, they should have at least had some buff stable boy without a shirt on! LOL"
Sorry I'm not a Chippendales dancer.:eek: It never occurred to that this was a marketing desire and certainly in the future I'll shoot the video again.:yes: I am a real life husband of a horsewoman, so I do understand where most of you are coming from. We have many horses, and board others, and I work with horses every day. I ride and train a 16.2hh Black Andalusian Stallion in the classical methods and began the www.rideinportugal.com website to share my love of the breed. When it comes to cleaning stalls and understanding the daily grind of horses I can definitely walk the talk.
A $169.99 Shake'n Fork is expensive for a fork, but not alot for a quality tool. Think of any good rechargeable tool, drills, shock collars, clippers, the life of the part depends on the quality of the components. Having poor battery life or tines that break would ruin an otherwise good idea. So we decided to go the high road and only use better components, then test them rigorously.
$39.00 for our Flex'n Fork is a bargain. We break the tines of typical $20.00 fork in less than a week, having a fork last a year seems cheap by comparison. A pound of raw plastic for our fork basket costs more than an entire normal fork sells for. When it comes to plastic you get what you pay for. At least when you decide to buy ours, you will get something that exceeds your expectations.

I love how, during the demonstration, a big ole pucky goes flying off along with the shavings.
When I was shooting the video I knew that some manure was popping off, and I could shoot it again where it does not. But thats not reality. It isn't like shaking by hand where it is a pain to sift it all again to get the one piece that bounced off. You just grab the one piece ( even with the whole pile of shavings) and let the fork do the work. It is so fast that is is easier to get all the big pieces and then get the bits that strayed, rather than trying to keep every piece on. Some users find they spend the same amount of time cleaning, but that the stalls are much cleaner and there is only a fraction of the replacement shavings used. Others clean to the same level but do it faster and with less shavings. In every case the stalls are cleaned and bedded for less money.


There was a booth at the Equine Affaire demonstrating that thing...lol And the demonstration had plastic poop balls.

We have never been to an Equine Affaire, (yet) so what you saw must have been a different product. There is a blower on a fork, there is a vibrator on a fork, neither of them is us. We do go to Horse Expos, we will be at Pomona in Feb, Scottsdale in Feb, Sacramento in June, also OH, MA and FLA later in the year. We often have expert cleaners try to shake the shavings through a normal fork as quickly as the Shake'n Fork does, some do, but the people are shaking like mad. I just stand there and push the button.

Even now, they are working to refine and change and improve the units until they are 100% "right" :)
As we get more feedback we are optimizing the product to make it lighter, quieter and (hopefully) cost less. But this will not be done at the expense of quality. Please continue to write your comments! Joseph www.shakenfork.com

Jealoushe
Jan. 26, 2009, 11:46 AM
I'm glad you are here to give us more insight. I want to ask a few questions.

How long does it take to clean a typical stall using the fork?

Is it strong enough to scoop big piles of poop in one go?

BEARCAT
Jan. 26, 2009, 12:04 PM
Okay, my question to the manufacturer:
Why doesn't the fork have sides? Seems like by creating a basket, it would make it more efficient... or is it because then users would overload it?

I've used the forks with sides and those are easy to shake and sort shavings from manure.

Rancherff
Jan. 26, 2009, 09:34 PM
Why doesn't the fork have sides? It seems like by creating a basket, it would make it more efficient... .

How long does it take to clean a typical stall using the fork? Is it strong enough to scoop big piles of poop in one go?

Thanks for the questions. We spent quite a bit of time evaluating two forks on the market that are on opposite ends of the "sides" question. One is the Wonderfork and the second is the Durafork. Both of them have advantages depending on their use. The Durafork has a very nice balanced feel and the size of the basket allows it to be fully loaded (even out to the sides) without trying to twist the handle in your hand. It is pretty easy to shake too. Unfortunately it does not hold very much and means more steps to the manure cart. But the biggest disadvantage of the low sides is that excess shavings and manure tends to spill over them. We shot high speed video to see exactly how forks sift shavings and it is amazing how much goes over the side. So the obvious answer is to raise the sides, right? Not really.
The biggest disadvantage of the larger basket is weight and unfortunately all of the weight is on the end of the handle. Weight alone makes it very difficult to shake. In fact the instructions on the wonderfork don't even talk about shaking at all, it suggests whacking the bottom of fork on the ground to drive the shavings though the tines:eek:. I don't know anyone who uses it this way. You also find out pretty quickly that if you load up a big basket fork out to the sides, the fork really wants to twist in your hand. It wants to turn upside down and so you need to grip the handle pretty strongly, especially if you try to shake it. Of course the advantage is fewer steps. We find it is great in the arena where I just want to make one trip to the pile.
It is a pretty tall order to make a fork better, and since taller sides were important we looked at how to raise them without (a) making it heavier, (b)
making it sift slower and (c) making it want to twist in your hands.
I'm going to compare these forks to our Flex'n Fork because it is more similar in its use to the others. We developed what we call a "mid size" basket (I'd put a photo but I can't figure how to attach it:no:) that has taller sides, but not so tall that they add too much weight. More importantly we changed the spacing of the side tines so that the shavings would still sift through, but the manure balls would stay on the fork. Most importantly we made the fork a bit wider. Normally this would unbalance the fork and with a full load out to the sides it would be hard to hold. To solve this we put a specially designed grip on the end with an OVAL shape. It tucks into your hand and won't twist even if you don't grip it all! Another design benefit is that the weight of this grip offsets the weight of the bigger basket and the fork actually has terriffic balance. It feels lighter to use, but is a couple ounces heavier than a small basket fork. There are other patented features to the Flex'n Fork, there is nothing else like it on the market.
Obviously we wanted to make a really superior fork before we added the weight of motor and batteries because the less time it takes to sift the shavings, the faster you can put it away and go ride!

How long it takes to clean a stall has so many answers that I cannot guess. There are so many variations in stall sizes, shavings size, bedding depth, time between cleanings and especially horse toilet manners. We have wood floors, 12x12 stalls and bed about 2 inches deep with smaller shavings. We clean daily with a "quick pick up" at night. I stall that isn't stirred takes about 5 to 10 minutes total (including rebedding) with a Flex'n Fork and slightly less with the Shake'n Fork. But a stirred:mad: stall can take twice that with a Flex'n Fork, yet with a Shake'n Fork it doesn't take any extra time.

We had a Percheron mare and know what a big pile is. That is one of the reasons that we decided to make the fork wider, rather than only taller. Both of our forks are more than strong enough to take what horse poop weighs. And remember that when the fork is really heavy (lots of liquid or manure) there are very few shavings to keep and you usually don't shake it at all.

You should see our really bling-ed out version. How do heated handgrips sound? Or LED lights for those dark corners?:yes::lol:

If you have other ideas I'd love to hear them.

Joseph

TrueColours
Jan. 29, 2009, 08:55 AM
I think the differences in forks and what appeals more to one person than another, lies in how you personally muck out a stall and if speed is more important than throwing out less bedding per stall

One barn I was at, the girls were given a mandate of 5 minutes or less per stall and then move on to the next one - that was for mucking out, dumping water buckets, replenishing hay. There was no sifting involved, no taking as few shavings as possible from each stall - it was a case of loading up that fork as much as possible and pitching it out. That barn LOVED the forks with sides on them and would never have been a candidate for the Shake N Fork (and I wonder now with the cost of bedding going sky high and being universally in short supply, if they have changed their way of mucking stalls??)

The Flex N Fork is a brilliant piece of engineering and until you actually try it, you wont understand the difference and the engineering that has actually gone into producing, refining and manufacturing it. As I mentioned before, for reasons you cannot understand or grasp, it just simply feels very very right to use and when you compare using it to the traditional shavings forks, there is a night and day difference in them

When I last spoke to Joseph and he told me about the heated handles and the LED light, I had to laugh - but that is just the way he is ... :)

Personally I wouldnt need the heated handles or the light because my barn and stalls are warm and bright, but some barns I have been in, they would have been a Godsend ...

He is also developing an add on ergonomically designed handle that I would like to try. I am not a fan of the ergonomic forks or shovels, but how he is describing this new attachment, it sounds like it will be brilliant ... :)

The one overwhelming factor that has struck me with both of these products, is the reason they have taken so long to get to market is that Joseph is a perfectionist. "Just a motor that shakes the fork" wont cut it. It had to have a very specific range of motion and a very specific way of shaking the fork, combined with shock absorbers in the fork itself to buffer that shaking action from the user. I dont know of anyone else that would put the thought and the time into getting this product 100% right, and then go through the ardous testing process that he has done to make sure that it no only works in his own structured test environment, but also in the 'real world" with real people in real barns with real stalls to clean

Even if the Shake N Fork doesnt appeal to you - get the Flex N Fork and give it a try. Its the "Mercedes" of mucking out forks ... :)