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View Full Version : Who the heck designs stalls with a water spigot INSIDE?



thatmoody
Jan. 13, 2009, 10:25 PM
Do they not actually have horses?

After 4 complete shaving changes (and changes of horse in the stall to try to find one who WOULDN'T mess with the spigot, we ended up taking a hay rack and modifying it to fit over the spigot. My hand will fit through, but the knob is protected.

But what a design flaw - I'm sure it seemed quite convenient at the time, but we didn't have ONE horse that didn't figure out within a day how to turn on the fun new toy!

Peggy
Jan. 13, 2009, 10:29 PM
Mine would probably alternate between turning it on and slicing his leg on it. Of course, this is the horse who figured out how to turn on the one outside his stall at his first horse show. What a lovely new toy! Especially when he figured out to turn it on as people were walking by.

MunchkinsMom
Jan. 13, 2009, 10:52 PM
I think you can get handles for the spigots that are removable, so you put it on only when you need to turn the water on.

Oh, I just did a google search and found they make a water spigot "lock":

http://www.amazon.com/tag/spigot%20lock

maybe that would work for you?

strawberry roan
Jan. 14, 2009, 06:28 AM
Now that I have never heard! My horses would empty my well if I had that. Would love to know the reasoning for it. Convenience?--but not thinking past that!! Definitely designed by someone who doesn't know horses. :)

Bluey
Jan. 14, 2009, 07:17 AM
Well, how convenient.:)
I would not have thought of that.;)
Maybe next time we build a barn, we will do just that.:lol:

Seriously, we don't have water in the stalls, because we don't keep horses shut in there.
They have 6' water tanks on covered floats between two pens.
If a horse were to need rehab in a stall, we would use water buckets.

I would never again have horses stalled without an outside pen to wander on, although stalls and even standing stalls is where most horses were kept in Europe and they did fine, since we exercised them several times a day in lessons and trail rides.
Still, if you have the room, don't keep them stalled unless absolutely necessary.
Better for them and much less labor cleaning after them.:yes:

And, oh, I have never seen spigots IN stalls.:confused:
That must be a very unique barn.:winkgrin:

thatmoody
Jan. 14, 2009, 07:20 AM
I'm sure that someone thought it would be tremendously convenient to not have to drag a hose over there - it's in the far corner of the barn farthest from the hose coupling. But honestly...

The hay rack seems to be working fine - the spigot is about eye level with me (not near the floor) so we just nestled the rack over it and the bottom part, where the bars are close together, covers it completely. I can reach through and down to turn it on, but the horse can't get his nose in there. Problem solved, but geez...

Mags
Jan. 14, 2009, 07:24 AM
Maybe it was a wash stall that they turned into a regular stall. I've been at barns were they would always find room for one more horse. A wash stall would be easy to convert. Just a thought.

Blue Yonder
Jan. 14, 2009, 10:01 AM
Some things that appear quite reasonable to a non-horsey builder make horse folks go NNOOOOO!!!!!!!

The guy who built my barn is a heck of a good welder and builder and did a great job. Except for the day I walked in to find one stall's exterior door with a brand new latch -- a teeny tiny one, installed on the INSIDE of the stall. Made sense to him - the latch went into the wall stud...you know, for structural soundness. YIKES! I told him that as much as I love my horses, I am neither going inside a barn stall in a fire, nor am I going into a stall should an animal become fractious or dangerous, in hopes of opening the exterior door from the inside. It was fixed forthwith, so no harm no foul.

Imagine what a great barn we could have if your water architect met my inside latch man!
:-)

Bluey
Jan. 14, 2009, 10:28 AM
My neighbor thought he was oh so helpful and the day I had my arm operated on came over and set the post for the shed extension into the ground and framed it.
What a neat surprise, he tought.:cool:
He had my plans and knew we were building a 14' extension, but didn't look at the plans carefully.
He knew we wanted the existing 14' gates to fit as they had.:yes:

Being a builder, but not a user of pens and gates, he thought 14' were OUTSIDE dimensions, so he set the 12" post where the 14' dimensions ended up 13' and didn't notice it.:eek:

We are the proud owners of 14' gates hung on the OUTSIDE of the 12' posts, leaving the aisle 13'.:p

http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a298/Robintoo/Horses2-20-07745.jpg?t=1231946525

He still kicks himself over that and now waits for me before getting into any new project.:winkgrin:

jazzrider
Jan. 14, 2009, 10:48 AM
I have an elevated/gravity water system made of PVC that runs above my stalls and drops down in the corner of each stall with a spicket at the end. So I can have hot and cold water run to my stalls. Very handy in winter. :yes: I absolutely love it. For the guys that have figured out it's a nifty toy, we were able to put a 2/4 to block their access.

Peggy
Jan. 14, 2009, 12:15 PM
Then there was the day my friend showed me her newly constructed/fixed up horse facility in her backyard. Houses in this area run down into a canyon so the horse facilities are generally on a slope and anything that needs to be on a flat (or is that level?) surface gets terraced. The new cross ties were her pride and joy, complete with tie posts set on the upright wall side and absolutely nothing to block the backside of the horse as it backed off the cross ties and down the slope of the canyon. They had thought it would be handy to have the wall at the horses' heads so they could put shelves and whatnot there. I did suggest that they put a fence behind where the horses would stand so they wouldn't roll down the hill.

War Admiral
Jan. 14, 2009, 12:19 PM
Ya know... I boarded at a place that had them, and I absolutely LOFFED it. But they did have the removable "key" to the spigot.

The advantages:

1 - You know how much water your horse consumes in the stall (which you don't, with auto-waterers) and

2 - You're not hauling heavy buckets.

If I ever built my own barn, I'd put them in, for sure!

winegum
Jan. 14, 2009, 12:38 PM
what a silly idea. horses will play with anything. I like the look of the posted spigot lock though. that is pretty neat.

I have never heard of a spigot inside the stall. at the barn I am at now we have to do it the old fashioned way and go around stall by stall with the hose.

at a barn I used to ride at though the stalls all had their own spigots outside or something. I can't remember what it looked like, but somehow they connected to the stall's inside, but the horses couldn't play with them.

Snowflake
Jan. 14, 2009, 12:44 PM
There's a very nice boarding barn here that has them, but they're overhead with hoses that extend to the buckets. It's a refurbished dairy barn, so I think the waterlines were already in place.

RAyers
Jan. 14, 2009, 12:55 PM
In the 3 barns I ride/board at they all have spigots in the stalls. It save a huge amount of time becasue we don't have to drag hoses to water, there is not the concern of automatic waterer breaking and we can change/clean buckets for sick horses.

There are plenty of ways to make it so the horses don't mess or break the spigots. Over the last 5 years there has only been one case I can remember where a stall flooded because a horse broke the spigot. The other floods were becasue a person forgot to turn off the spigot after watering their horse.

Reed

War Admiral
Jan. 14, 2009, 12:55 PM
It's really not a silly idea AT ALL, so long as the spigots are well-placed and do have either keys or removable handles so that the horses cannot get at them.

The ones at the barn I had were built into concrete walls so horsey could not possibly mess with it, and were positioned in a corner where horsey could not possibly get hurt on it.

I'd have them again in a heartbeat, I really would.

I've also seen individual spigots outside with short pieces of hose attached to them which reach into the bucket. This works too, but I didn't like it as well: you're constantly having to re-make the hose pieces b/c either someone leaves them up and they get chewed, or the hose just plain cracks/breaks w/ age and temperature. I got to be quite the pro at making them after a while...

Finzean
Jan. 14, 2009, 05:22 PM
Friends of mine had their barn built with a spigot over every stall and a hose piece in each that went down into the bucket. It was constructed so that the horses really couldn't get to it so it was never a problem and it was horribly convenient. The problem came when one of the pipes that ran from stall to stall burst. Whomever had built the barn had put the plumbing under the cement aisle - what a disaster. They had to have the entire barn aisle torn out.

I love the convenience of the spigot at every stall, don't love the auto waterers b/c you don't know h2o consumption. But in the long run, I'm sort of a Luddite to a degree - I'd rather have my industrial strength hose (hosepipe when I lived in SC!!). If it bursts I can just pull one out of the trailer until I can run to the hardware store.

JoZ
Jan. 15, 2009, 01:14 AM
Couldn't the water be turned off somewhere "upstream"? I think it sounds like a wonderful idea! Walk into the barn, flip some lever to turn the water on, and go about your business. Of course there's the night you forget to turn it OFF at the source, I suppose. But still...

Being in the PNW, our barn water system is just a network of hoses from a hydrant outside the barn. I've wanted to rig a hose matrix along the back wall of the stalls -- long horizontal hose with couplings and vertical hoses dropping into each stall/bucket. Of course they couldn't all be turned on at once. And since they'd have to be at the backs of each stall, it would require going INTO each stall. I swear the idea has merit, just needs some tweaking.

hitchinmygetalong
Jan. 15, 2009, 09:12 AM
http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a298/Robintoo/Horses2-20-07745.jpg?t=1231946525

:winkgrin:

Interesting setup, Bluey. I like it.

Bluey
Jan. 15, 2009, 09:46 AM
Interesting setup, Bluey. I like it.

Thank you, we have now finished the trim on that end, but people many years from now will wonder what idiot set the post inside and hung the gates from the outside of a gate opening.:eek: :p :lol:

I remember some stables that had water in each stall, but the faucets were not where horses could get to them to play with them.

Just remember that water pipes and faucets have a way to leak or break.
In one stable with automatic waterers, each stall had concrete floors and a drain to the ouside, for when they flooded.;)

MSP
Jan. 16, 2009, 11:11 AM
All my stalls are plumbed with water. I used non-freeze hydrants but they do freeze up around 20 degrees. Mine are on the outside of the stall however!

Once I used a hydrant to hang a halter and one of my horses decided to bite and pull the halter which in turn turned on the water! So I don't hang any thing on them now. :winkgrin:

The people that installed in inside the stall perhaps could have had an auto waterer install or it could have been a wash rack stall at one point.

I hate hoses and love my water plumbed in!

kellyb
Jan. 16, 2009, 11:17 AM
Been at two barns that had them. One has a hydrant style handle with a short hose attached to it in each stall. Scary because I have seen a couple horses catch their legs in the hose. Secondly, saw another horse catch his halter on it (owner had him tied right above it) and panic, breaking the halter.

Second barn had the spigot right above where the water bucket hung, so no hose needed. Besides the occasional horse bumping/playing with it, we didn't have any problems. Maybe 1-2 times a year they would turn it on and it would flood the stall.

ToN Farm
Jan. 16, 2009, 03:59 PM
Friends of mine had their barn built with a spigot over every stall and a hose piece in each that went down into the bucket. It was constructed so that the horses really couldn't get to it so it was never a problem and it was horribly convenient. The problem came when one of the pipes that ran from stall to stall burst.
I have spigots INSIDE each stall and set up as stated above. It's been this way since the barn was built in 1990......so 18 years. I have had no problems. I do shut the water off in extreme cold temps so the pipes don't freeze. I can't speak for others, but my reasoning was to keep things sleek on the outside of the stall. My electrical is all recessed as well.

MSP
Jan. 16, 2009, 04:30 PM
I worked at a very nice barn that had the water pipes running above the stalls and then down into the stalls to auto waters. I think the turn levers (looked more like the gas levers) were outside the stall but not in the way of the sliding doors.

This can and will freeze so when I built my barn I went with hydrants and all pipes are under ground. I have never had a problem in the isle but with my design my isle isn't used a lot. Every stall has its own outside door for turn out. If a hydrant breaks I left a foot square of dirt around the hydrant so it can be replaced.

nightsong
Jan. 17, 2009, 04:41 AM
I was looking at a place to rent that had a shed-row barn with six or eight stalls. The owner PROUDLY exclaimed that he had put water in each stall. They had the actual pipe sticking up from the floor to about four feet in height, about a foot from the wall and a third of the way down from the corner :eek::eek::eek:!

Over the Hill
Jan. 17, 2009, 06:38 AM
I live in Florida, and although we don't have to worry about a frostline, I have pvc piping run completely around the exterior of the barn, below the frostline, and t'd into at each stall. The pvc runs up the outside of the stall wall and into the stall right above the water bucket. Each stall has a separate valve outside. The barn was originally piped for automatic waterers, but I prefer to know how much my horses are drinking, so I stubbed a short pvc length through the wall and placed a 90 degree slip fitting to direct the water down into the bucket. In winter months, when the temps dip into the low 20's and sometimes teens, I wrap the outside pipe with pipe insulation and have a faucet cover adapted to cover each faucet. Serves me well and have never had a horse play with the fitting on the end. ( I intentionally did not glue the 90 on, so if they did play, it would come off without damage to the stub )

thatmoody
Jan. 17, 2009, 08:28 AM
Those designs all sound much more intuitive around animals. Just a simple enclosure on this one seems to have solved the problem, and I do agree that it's convenient to not have to haul the hose. But the rest of the stalls in this barn are NOT plumbed, so if it had a concrete floor I'd think wash stall, but nope :P. It just seems to be a design oddity. We're trying to design a new barn, so this helps give me some options for watering. We're not planning on auto waterers (too $$$), though.

merrygoround
Jan. 17, 2009, 10:12 AM
I was looking at a place to rent that had a shed-row barn with six or eight stalls. The owner PROUDLY exclaimed that he had put water in each stall. They had the actual pipe sticking up from the floor to about four feet in height, about a foot from the wall and a third of the way down from the corner :eek::eek::eek:!

Perhaps, he planned on Nelson waterers. Or you buying them installing them and then leaving them. :D

ESG
Jan. 19, 2009, 01:06 PM
Mine would probably alternate between turning it on and slicing his leg on it. Of course, this is the horse who figured out how to turn on the one outside his stall at his first horse show. What a lovely new toy! Especially when he figured out to turn it on as people were walking by.

I'd have paid damned good money to see that! ROFLMAO! :lol::lol::lol::lol:

nightsong
Jan. 19, 2009, 07:49 PM
Perhaps, he planned on Nelson waterers. Or you buying them installing them and then leaving them. :D

Ithink he was just clueless. Who ELSE would install a pipe sticking up out of a stall floor, a foot away from the wall, and not even in (or NEAR) the corner?

Peggy
Jan. 19, 2009, 11:10 PM
I'd have paid damned good money to see that! ROFLMAO! :lol::lol::lol::lol:The people who were his targets were not as amused;). I removed the faucet handle since I didn't think that locking a 3 y.o. in the stall with both doors shut was a great option. This is the same horse who has turned on the sprinklers in the turn-out ring so he can play in them. The first few times we thought that maybe someone had turned them on b/c we just found him with them on, but then someone saw him do it. This involves pushing down a lever thing. Clever beast.

smokygirl
Jan. 21, 2009, 07:40 AM
Lol.. We used to have an old "free range" pony (we had perimeter fencing, so he could wander where ever his heart desired). One summer, mom yelled at me for leaving the hose on all night. I swore I hadn't ofcourse. A few days later, it happened again. I knew I'd turned it off, so she yelled at my brother. During this time, on both the nights before she found it on.. the dog had barked a lot that night (our outside dog slept in a kennel at night.. or she'd bring home "game"). So one night, she's just going nuts. Mom goes out and the dog is soaking wet and the hose is on. Mom thinks we've had an intruder. Bring dog in, get her dried off. Stay up late the next night watching the kennel. Darn pony was turning on the faucet, drinking and then spraying the dog (which he hated).

Fairview Horse Center
Jan. 21, 2009, 03:53 PM
I LOVED the barn that I was at that had spigots in the stalls. They made life incredibly easy. We did have a main at the end of each aisle, so when finished watering, you just shut off the main. The system was also installed with the overhead running pipe slightly downlill, so when cold, you just shut off the main, and then went down the aisle, opening all of the spigots to drain it. PERFECT!