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Serigraph
Jan. 7, 2009, 12:53 PM
Per month? Assuming it gets hay, pasture, grain if needed, trims, shots, worming, etc.

I'm trying to decide if I should get one. Do you have to keep it off good pasture when it comes in?

Personal Champ
Jan. 7, 2009, 08:45 PM
Next to nothing. Seriously.

My guy is coming 3, this July. He's a jack (ungelded). I've never had any problems with him gaining too much weight, so I don't keep him off pasture, although ours isn't lush.

Here's what I do:
1/4 quart grain 2x day (sounds like a ton, but works for him)
3 flakes of hay a day (less if good pasture is available)
Deworming every 8-12 weeks - a tube lasts us 3 or 4 doses, depending on original size
Trimming - he's an active bugger - I only have to touch up his balance 3 times a year or so.
Shots - our vet (who has donkeys) recommended vaccinating only for rabies and tetanus. Said they are disease resistant little buggers. Not sure how much I buy that, so I vacc. for the same as I do the horses. Works out to be 70 bucks a year.

Hope that helps!

tkhawk
Jan. 7, 2009, 09:09 PM
Wow! mini donkeys! I never heard of those-how big are they?

SaddleUp158
Jan. 7, 2009, 09:14 PM
Next to nothing! I don't know what kind of vaccs he gets, but he just eats off the round bale that is out for the horses so he is very minimal to feed. One of the best companions for the horses, much better then the goats.

Waterwitch
Jan. 7, 2009, 09:42 PM
My mini-donk Francesca:

Trim every other horse trim (around every 10-12 weeks): $25 per trim (same as horses)

Vax: same cost as horses as dose is the same (we do flu/rhino/EWT/WNV/rabies)

Deworming: MUCH less expensive but she is done on same schedule and with same products as horses, including yearly power pack

Feed: grass and high quality roundbale (she only weighs 300# so estimate consumption at 5-6# per day), free choice minerals - no grain. Peppermint horse cookies are probably the most expensive things she eats:D

I have a grazing muzzle for her but tend not to use it.

horsepoor
Jan. 7, 2009, 11:16 PM
Mine is a mini-mule, but I think her costs are similar to those for a mini-donk:). She's out with my retired horse, so she pretty much eats whatever hay he allows her to steal, and she gets 1/2 oz (seriously) of oats am and pm just so she thinks she gets "something" while the horses eat their grain. So I'd put her feed cost at pennies per day. Worming is a little cheaper since she weighs only about 500 lbs. (so one tube will do one horse, but two minis!). She does cost the same to trim as a horse ($40 every 6 or 7 weeks), but I actually consider it harder to do as the farrier has to get down on his knees to do it and she's not the most cooperative all the time.
Mine has foundered in the past, so I do have to keep her off the grass and watch what she is fed. I have a grazing muzzle for her, but have yet to use it -- it has been easier to just confine her to a dry lot when needed as my retired horse (which she shares turnout with) is also prone to founder, so they both need similar limits.

WaningMoon
Jan. 8, 2009, 07:32 AM
Wow! mini donkeys! I never heard of those-how big are they?

36" or less.

WaningMoon
Jan. 8, 2009, 07:35 AM
Per month? Assuming it gets hay, pasture, grain if needed, trims, shots, worming, etc.

I'm trying to decide if I should get one. Do you have to keep it off good pasture when it comes in?

Should not be fed grain or alfalfa. Need to keep protein around 5%. OTherwise hoof problems will be your friend.

tkhawk
Jan. 8, 2009, 04:04 PM
36" or less.

Thanks..Wow that is real small. I remember in another post a fellow COTH member saying they had a mini mule named Burrito!:lol: I just assumed you cross a donkey to a mini-didn't realize you had a mini donkey-they sound cute though!

WaningMoon
Jan. 8, 2009, 05:12 PM
Thanks..Wow that is real small. I remember in another post a fellow COTH member saying they had a mini mule named Burrito!:lol: I just assumed you cross a donkey to a mini-didn't realize you had a mini donkey-they sound cute though!

They are very cute and cuddly. I have had mine since 93 or 94 and got him at one yr old. They do have different feeding requirements such as being fed a low protein diet and no grain. HE is the most loving little creature ever. Here is a pic of him all decked out for the holidays along with his friend who was born in the pasture with him in 95.
http://i129.photobucket.com/albums/p235/Born2Bloom/horse%20christmas%20photos/jenenes-autumn-horse239.jpg

NOt sure but if you mean you cross a donkey to a mini horse to get a mini donkey that is not correct. They are just pure donkey, no mini horse involved. Both parents are mini donkeys to get a mini donkey.

Personal Champ
Jan. 8, 2009, 08:14 PM
Should not be fed grain or alfalfa. Need to keep protein around 5%. OTherwise hoof problems will be your friend.

Perhaps for some, but mine has gotten grain for the last 2 years with no hoof problems - wish my horses had as good of feet!

pricestory
Jan. 10, 2009, 07:54 PM
Mine get the same vaccines, same wormer, except that they get dosed according to size, about 250-300lbs. I keep a loose vit/min/salt suppliment for them free choice. The jennys get 1/4c complete pellet so they think they are eating while everyone else does. They get moved up to 1/2c the month before they foal. Trimmed on the same schedule as the horses.
cost the same. Their hay is more because they have to be off the grass (fescue) for the end of their pregnancy just like the horses.
My 3 are due starting in about 6 weeks. Yahoo, baby donkeys are the cutes things in the world. About 20" and 20 lbs at birth and total fuzz.

Artie
Jan. 11, 2009, 12:02 AM
We have a 2yr gelding mini-donk; Bandit, and we love him to death, but before being gelded he was a jerk!!
Shots: same as the other ponies
Food:handful of grain 2x a day just so he thinks he's eating, 1pad of orchard mix hay. He's so fat, even with hardly any grass
Feet: usually every other time the horses get done
Worming: same as the horses, but a mini dose, 250-300lbs

DiablosHalo
Jan. 12, 2009, 01:36 PM
I agree with pp's... not much! My two eat 1/2 flake timothy each am/pm. No grain- except when they are loose on farm and clean up under buckets outside! And they are fat! Trim 3x/year.

The part that got expensive for me (and only the one year buying them) was ... their stable blankets, turnout blankets, flysheets and flymasks and fly leggings. Lil leather halters w/nameplates. I have to admit- they are the cutest thing on the farm!

I've actually thought about selling all my big guys and just having lil minis on the farm. I enjoy them more than the big guys!

Sing Mia Song
Jan. 12, 2009, 05:16 PM
You have no idea how happy I am to see this thread, as my mini-donk will be arriving this weekend! :p

HookedOnReefing
Jan. 12, 2009, 06:33 PM
this thread is worth NOTHING without pictures!!!:D

If you got one, please post a picture.

chai
Jan. 12, 2009, 10:55 PM
OK, HookedOnReefing, since you asked :-)

How can I resist posting pictures of Lovey and Thurston!

http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y97/eastmeadowfarm/DSC_0023.jpg
Thurston meeting our WB mare:
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y97/eastmeadowfarm/DSCF2678.jpg
Lovey smiling:
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y97/eastmeadowfarm/DSC_0044.jpg

Mini donkeys are cute, affectionate, smart and full of mischief. These two make me smile at least once a day. SingMiaSong, please post pictures when your mini donkey arrives!

WaningMoon
Jan. 13, 2009, 06:16 AM
this thread is worth NOTHING without pictures!!!:D

If you got one, please post a picture.

Here you go-
http://i129.photobucket.com/albums/p235/Born2Bloom/horses/jakeonwayhome-1.jpg On his way home 14 yrs ago


http://i129.photobucket.com/albums/p235/Born2Bloom/horses/echo006.jpg

http://i129.photobucket.com/albums/p235/Born2Bloom/horses/summer08069.jpg

http://i129.photobucket.com/albums/p235/Born2Bloom/horse%20christmas%20photos/jenenes-autumn-horse201.jpg his christmas 08 photo

HookedOnReefing
Jan. 13, 2009, 08:09 AM
Absolutely adorable. Thanks for posting pictures!

Do horses normally get along with mini donks? Or do they tend to get bullied? IOW would they make good pasture mates?

WaningMoon
Jan. 13, 2009, 08:20 AM
Absolutely adorable. Thanks for posting pictures!

Do horses normally get along with mini donks? Or do they tend to get bullied? IOW would they make good pasture mates?

OH, they make wonderful pasturemates. My donkey was my mares moms pasture mate when my mare was born. She was born right out in the pasture with him. Unfortunately I lost the mare as she was killed by a truck where I had her boared during a move. I had her mom too. Now I have the mare who was born with the donkey and the donkey. They have been together for 13 yrs. They share a small run in shelter full of shavings. The donkey has a shavings thing. He must roll in them each time new ones are added. He has shavings in him right down to the skin. I try to get tehm all out but its just not possible. HE loves it, moans and groans. HE gets up and lays on his other side and starts the whole process all over. He'll spend at least ten minutes doing it each time.

Just realized the above sounds confusing on the what mare who thing. Basically I got horse in 1971, bred her and got a big black mare, bred her and got the big black mare I have now. so had this ones mom and her grandmom. Once an animal comes to me they are here for life no matter what. And I do mean no matter what.

seabreeze
Jan. 13, 2009, 08:21 AM
Do horses normally get along with mini donks? Or do they tend to get bullied? IOW would they make good pasture mates?


I'd like to know the same thing.

chai
Jan. 13, 2009, 09:15 AM
Yes, they make wonderful pasture mates. I had a standard donkey for 18 years and now we have two minis. Just like with horses, the introductions should be made over the fence, and some horses are initially terrified of donkeys with their huge ears. Our standard donkey would play 'tag' with one of our OTTB rescues. They played just like kids, chasing each other around our cross country jumps, tagging each other and running away. Visitors to the farm who don't know about animals found it fascinating to see that they really do play. Our standard donk was so smart that when he'd had enough of the game, he would sidle up beside the boss mare in the herd, who the OTTB had great respect for. Once he was inside the boss mare's orbit, the game was over.

Donkeys are wonderful babysitters because they are patient, playful and for the most part low key. But they are not wimps. Our minis will commandeer the run in and push our 17.2H WB mare out!
They are not a magic pill for aggressive horses, though, so they should not be turned out with a super aggressive pasture bully. They will protect their herd, and I've seen our donkeys chase and strike at strange dogs, turkeys and other animals they see as a danger, although they do not show any aggression toward humans.
Donkeys can carry lungworm, which horses that are turned out in the same field can pick up. It's rare for a horse to actually get lungworm, but the possibility is there so donkeys should be dewormed with Ivermectin on the same rotation with horses.
Donkeys are air ferns, and they can do very well on a good grass hay diet. I give ours a tiny handful of Triple Crown Lite at feeding time just so I can get their vitamins into them and they don't feel left out while the other horses are eating.
Also, their feet are different from horses, so make sure your farrier knows how to trim a donkey hoof, which is more tubular and upright than a horse's hoof. Hopefully, you will find a donk whose owner worked on picking up their feet right from the beginning. One of the only problems with donkeys that haven't been worked with is picking up feet, making it brutal for the farrier. They learn quickly, but they are incredibly strong, so if they haven't been worked with, it will take time and patience to teach them about lifting their feet.
The last thing you should consider, especially with a mini, is the fact that they are Houdini-like in their ability to escape and find mischief.
Our standard donkey took great joy in showing the other horses how much smarter he was. He would take the rail of our post and rail fence in his teeth and work it back and forth until he pulled it out of the fence. Then he would just walk under it and graze on the lawn, exulting in the horses' jealousy. :-)
Our mini, Lovey, would make a great Marine because she can get right down on her belly to scramble under anything if there is green grass on the horizon.
They really are fun and while I love horses, donkeys are incredibly vocal and affectionate, and if you scratch inside their ears, they will love you forever.
Hope that helps!

WaningMoon
Jan. 13, 2009, 10:01 AM
Guess they're all a bit different. Mine hates his ears fooled with. Never,ever tries to get out, but as said by someone else they are very vocal. HE loves to be hugged. The breeder told me when I got him 14 yrs ago that they all like to carry things in their teeth. Mine will hunt out a stick, sometimes a fairly good sized one and then taunt my mare with it. HE always picks the same hour of the day though, always between 10 + 11 in the morning. HE will jab her with it and then run off, to come right back and do it again. sometime I will have to get that on video, it is really funny and he'll do it until she makes him stop by taking the stick away but she usually allows him his fun for quite a while. The breeder also told me that their feet are their defense, they are very accurate with any foot they wish to use. They don't like to relinquish a foot as then they feel defenseless. My donkey is very good about having his feet handled, its never been a problem but I think the breeder I bought him from handles them each day from birth. She has over 150 of them and is very knowledgeable.

Jasmine
Jan. 13, 2009, 01:12 PM
My mule does not like the other horses. They pick on him. I think it's more because he's a mini than it is because he's a mule. He'll stay with his stallion buddy even if he has the chance to run. The few times he's been in with the other horses, he'll stand by the gate and bray until we bring him back to his bud. But then, the stallion defers to the mule. The mule is FAR more dominant than the stud.

basil's mom
Jan. 13, 2009, 01:33 PM
I bought Dino last year to keep my horse company. He was an unhandled yearling. He warmed up to us in a day, way faster than any horse. He loves hugs and grooming. When the hormones kicked in he was a real a**, pun intended. It only took about a month after gelding for him to turn back into my sweet boy. He gets free choice hay (round bale), shots once a year. Wormed every 4 weeks (I do the horses every 4 weeks), he has been trimmed only once since I got him. I have my farrier check him when he comes out to do my horses, but he has only done him once (Dino is very good about picking up his feet). I will add that if you are married plan on your husband getting very attached. Every one I know that has one says that it is the husbands favorite equine. My husband takes ours for walks around the farm. I love mine and am now looking for another. I forgot to add mine makes the sweetest squeeking sound, he rarely brays.

Personal Champ
Jan. 13, 2009, 02:22 PM
I had 2 mini donks - one got sick and died, so I'm down to one, who lives out with 2 mini horses.

But, when I had both donks, they went out with my 3 horses. They all got along fine, although the donks and horses tended to stick to their own kind. Funniest thing is, I had a shedrow barn where the 2 stalls doubled as run-ins. You would find the 3 horses crammed in one 10x10, and the 2 mini donks lounging spaciously in the fresh shavings in the other.

Moral of story: Mini Donks Will Not Be Bullied, Even By Much Larger Equines! :lol:

CanterQueen
Jan. 13, 2009, 03:03 PM
We have a 2yr gelding mini-donk; Bandit, and we love him to death, but before being gelded he was a jerk!!
Shots: same as the other ponies
Food:handful of grain 2x a day just so he thinks he's eating, 1pad of orchard mix hay. He's so fat, even with hardly any grass
Feet: usually every other time the horses get done
Worming: same as the horses, but a mini dose, 250-300lbs

Yup, same here. Gelded him at about 13 months old. Except I do his feet and have the farrier check on him when he's out. Daily wormer -- smaller amount as he's just about 175 lbs.

Great guard animal. Keeps the neighbors and their dogs off of my property. I've got some great stories about people he's chased -- for another time.

randomname
Nov. 11, 2011, 03:44 AM
So would it be fair to say around $1000 a year? Higher? Lower? I am getting a horse and need to get it some company. If a mini donk works, it will save me from buying another horse! They do stay in the same pasture? Im so confused!

Buck63
Nov. 11, 2011, 08:10 AM
So would it be fair to say around $1000 a year? Higher? Lower? I am getting a horse and need to get it some company. If a mini donk works, it will save me from buying another horse! They do stay in the same pasture? Im so confused!

I got my mini for the same reason. I got one horse, but couldn't afford the expense of a 2nd. I wouldn't trade him for anything. He's the sweetest, most loveable creature! I added up all my expenses and it came out to less than $500/year for grain, hay, de-worming, vaccines, coggins, and farrier. His gelding cost $300 and a rain sheet and blanket were about $120 total.

He's gets a handful of low-fat/starch/protein pellets twice daily, and he doesn't even need that. He gets timothy/grass hay along with pasture when available. He's not been ill in the 3 and a half years I've owned him. He and the horse are together 24/7 and get along great. They play a lot and he's given the horse a few scars on his neck from biting. He has his own run-in stall, I just put a stall guard on the door to keep the horse out. I've never had to separate them for any reason.

I have to watch him around other animals. He will chase down dogs, cats, birds, etc. He trampled a fat chicken who couldn't get out of his way:cry: I've taught him to accept the dogs and he now grooms them!

All in all, he's worth his weight in gold. While I think that a horse would prefer another horse for a companion, a donkey is definitely a great companion. Mine have developed a very strong bond. The only problem is that I have to leave him alone when I take the horse out riding. I can't wait until I can afford to get another mini... then the horse might feel left out... then I'll just have to get another horse...;)

Good luck with your venture. Others have already given good advice on introductions and behavioral signs. I'm sure you won't be disappointed if you get one.

ake987
Nov. 11, 2011, 04:57 PM
Can't comment on cost, as our barn mini donkey belongs to the BO.. along with his pasturemate, Spot.. the zebra.

Only thing I can say you will pay for is your hearing. Oh, the braying. But he is an awesome little dude. Has way more attitude than the zebra, I might add!

deckchick
Nov. 11, 2011, 08:50 PM
I have a mini donk, his name is Two Can Sam, he gets along great with all my critters. He really is an air fern, my biggest expense is the $25.00 I pay the farrier every 8-10 weeks. He just grazes in the pasture with my horse and my goats, he doesn't get any grain, he doesn't need it.

Here is a pic of him and Willow the horse looking after Momma and 1 week old baby pigs.

Two Can Sam and Willow (https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10150222555660780&set=a.84916775779.92686.576810779&type=3&theater)

TheOtherHorse
Nov. 11, 2011, 09:22 PM
My mini donk, Taco, is very inexpensive and low maintenance. We got him as a companion for my retired horse. We have a rocky pasture and his hooves stay really good, so we just trim/shape them every 3 months or so. I deworm him on the same schedule as the horses, but 1 tube lasts 2-3x longer than the horses. He gets core stay home vaccines, same as his companion mare. He doesn't need his teeth floated quite as often as the horses. He does not get any grain; just grass, grass hay, and free choice loose minerals. He was obese when we got him, but has never foundered (apparently donkeys don't founder as easily as horses), but since his companion is IR so I put a muzzle on him or dry lot confinement whenever I do so for his IR buddy, just in case.

He is a sweet comical little guy, gets along well with all the horses, and is very nice to have around. We had goats as companion animals in the past, and the donkey is soooo much better.

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=469437827350&l=0c91929bc1

Cindyg
Nov. 11, 2011, 09:55 PM
Absolutely adorable. Thanks for posting pictures!

Do horses normally get along with mini donks? Or do they tend to get bullied? IOW would they make good pasture mates?

Do they get bullied? Ha! That's a laugh! :lol: If mine were any bigger, my horse would get nothing to eat.

I don't know if mine is typical, but he is very dominant. He has my horse whipped into shape!

I don't mean that he's mean or aggressive. He's not. He's a very gentle pet. He has particularly gentle lips. He's very careful about taking treats. But he told my horse who was in charge of things from Day 1. Happily, my horse is big enough that he does still get *some* chow! :lol:

In all seriousness, a miniature donkey doesn't eat much, but they have the same care requirements as a horse: trimming, worming, shots, shelter, etc. Mine has his own tiny little blanket, which I do put on him on the coldest nights of the year. I have seen him shiver once. (I've never seen my horse shiver, and I don't normally blanket.)

My horse and my donkey are very happy together. They do sometimes play roughly, and I realize the horse *could* kick the donkey in the head; but I think the horse's size advantage is balanced out by the donkey's dominance.

This is a picture of mine eating together. (https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=1453685190517&l=c356901316) There's an automatic feeder on the other side of that wall. Grain drops in to the horse's bucket. There are holes cut in the horse's bucket that drops a bit of feed down to the donkey's bucket.

FatCatFarm
Nov. 21, 2011, 02:17 PM
This is a picture of mine eating together. (https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=1453685190517&l=c356901316) There's an automatic feeder on the other side of that wall. Grain drops in to the horse's bucket. There are holes cut in the horse's bucket that drops a bit of feed down to the donkey's bucket.

I love this photo! :) Well, I had said I was not going to get any more mini donks. We had two, a little jack who we had castrated and a little jenny. They were both cute and only 29" tall. The jenny did require alot of hoof care and the jack, even after becoming a gelding, was still a brat. I was dealing with a horse with a broken shoulder at the time and decided to sell them as a pair as they were very bonded. I really liked the jenny better than the gelded jack. She was sweet and more level-headed. Too, I think because they were a bonded pair, it was harder to get them really tame. I owned them for over a year and handled them alot and they would still sometimes be quite difficult to approach/catch.

So, to make this long story short, I ran across an ad on CL offering a one and a-half year old Mini Spotted Jenny for $75. The guy who had her had gotten her for his mini jack and for coyote control. He said he paid over $200 for her and that's the low end of the going rate for them here in GA. His jack, oddly enough, had taken a shine to one of his neighbor's mare ponies and wouldn't stay in the pasture, so he sold or gave him away. That left this little jenny by herself out with the cows having calves who were running her all over the pasture, so she needed a new situation. She came home with me yesterday. She too has not had alot of handling, but I've got her in a stall and I think she'll come around quickly. She let me worm her without fuss this morning and made little chirping noises at my big grey gelding over the stall door. The little longears are definitely cuties. :yes:

WaningMoon
Nov. 21, 2011, 03:09 PM
I love this photo! :) Well, I had said I was not going to get any more mini donks. We had two, a little jack who we had castrated and a little jenny. They were both cute and only 29" tall. The jenny did require alot of hoof care and the jack, even after becoming a gelding, was still a brat. I was dealing with a horse with a broken shoulder at the time and decided to sell them as a pair as they were very bonded. I really liked the jenny better than the gelded jack. She was sweet and more level-headed. Too, I think because they were a bonded pair, it was harder to get them really tame. I owned them for over a year and handled them alot and they would still sometimes be quite difficult to approach/catch.

So, to make this long story short, I ran across an ad on CL offering a one and a-half year old Mini Spotted Jenny for $75. The guy who had her had gotten her for his mini jack and for coyote control. He said he paid over $200 for her and that's the low end of the going rate for them here in GA. His jack, oddly enough, had taken a shine to one of his neighbor's mare ponies and wouldn't stay in the pasture, so he sold or gave him away. That left this little jenny by herself out with the cows having calves who were running her all over the pasture, so she needed a new situation. She came home with me yesterday. She too has not had alot of handling, but I've got her in a stall and I think she'll come around quickly. She let me worm her without fuss this morning and made little chirping noises at my big grey gelding over the stall door. The little longears are definitely cuties. :yes:

$200? Wow, that is cheap. This is where I bought mine in 1993 and I paid $1400 for him then. I see now some are up to $2500 and more. http://www.asspirinacres.com/for-sale-miniature-donkeys.html

Paddys Mom
Nov. 21, 2011, 03:22 PM
Well, he was super cheap until the allergic reaction and subsequent hospitalization. :sigh:

FatCatFarm
Nov. 21, 2011, 03:27 PM
$200? Wow, that is cheap. This is where I bought mine in 1993 and I paid $1400 for him then. I see now some are up to $2500 and more. http://www.asspirinacres.com/for-sale-miniature-donkeys.html

Yes, but I'm sure your guy has a pedigree and likely very good structure. Most people in this area just don't care about papers. Some are registered, but most are not. Bred mini spotted jenny's go for $500, but that's without papers. Little jacks can be had for $150. $75 for a spotted jenny was really cheap though.

Guin
Nov. 21, 2011, 06:11 PM
I love the photos!
Here's a terminology question for you donkey people:

Is "jennet" pronounced "jenny"? I have seen both spellings. Do both words refer to a female donkey?

What is the difference between a mule and a hinny? (I assume hinny is pronounced with the "H"?)

Meredith Clark
Nov. 21, 2011, 09:11 PM
It costs us next to nothing to keep our mini (affectionately named "mini-donk")

She wears a muzzle so doesn't cut into the horse's grazing area really, she gets a handful of senior feed with the boys at feeding. She gets her tiny hooves trimmed with the boys every 6-8 weeks and she gets a little bit of wormer.

She really is priceless though. She lets us ride her and she's the best baby sitter ever! me and my sister have 3 horses at home and we often take 2 out riding and leave one there. mini-donk takes very good care of whoever is left home and keeps it from pacing the fence line or being crazy.

WaningMoon
Nov. 22, 2011, 05:37 AM
Yes, but I'm sure your guy has a pedigree and likely very good structure. Most people in this area just don't care about papers. Some are registered, but most are not. Bred mini spotted jenny's go for $500, but that's without papers. Little jacks can be had for $150. $75 for a spotted jenny was really cheap though.

I didn't get papers. She would not give them to me until he was gelded. He was gelded as soon as I bought him and I never asked for the papers. Just wanted the donkey, did n't care about the papers. I hope he lives a very long time, he is my best friend. He follows me every where Im working outside. He will take my tools and drag them off but he is so cute doing it I don't mind. He does like to, "hold ' me. Without me even knowing he is often attached to me. He will grab a piece of my jacket or carefully grab a loose piece of my clothing and just hold on. BUT, I have a 'dead foot' now days and it often will cause me to fall when I first go to step away and find I am again attached. But he does't understand, Im just trying to rememeber to check first,before I move.

rosijet
Nov. 23, 2011, 05:24 PM
I love the photos!
Here's a terminology question for you donkey people:

Is "jennet" pronounced "jenny"? I have seen both spellings. Do both words refer to a female donkey?

What is the difference between a mule and a hinny? (I assume hinny is pronounced with the "H"?)

Jennet is pronounced jen-it and is the real terminology for a female donkey. Jenny is the slang.

A mule has a horse dam and donkey sire and a hinny (with an H sound) has a donkey dam and horse sire.

Cindyg
Nov. 23, 2011, 11:23 PM
Jennet is pronounced jen-it and is the real terminology for a female donkey. Jenny is the slang.

A mule has a horse dam and donkey sire and a hinny (with an H sound) has a donkey dam and horse sire.

Is a hinny essentially the same as a mule? (I mean I get the technical difference, but can you look at one and tell?)

Nes
Nov. 23, 2011, 11:36 PM
The ones I've seen look more like donkeys, while mules look more like horses :)

manyspots
Nov. 24, 2011, 01:14 AM
We LOVE our little guy!!!!

I honestly don't even really count food as an expense with him. He cleans up the scraps from my geldings (TWHs) hay and eats literally a handful of soak plain beet pulp at "meal time." Our biggest expense is shots in the spring (same as the big guys at about $200). He does have a wardrobe... but he doesn't need it! He hates the rain and snow and chooses to stay in! My farrier doesn't charge me to trim him, but he is on the same trimming schedule (6 weeks) so it would be $40/visit.

Gelding was $350.00. He was a bit of pain before hand and mellowed almost immediately. He is now two and stands at 31". He is out with the big guys and he bosses them around. He takes no crap and is a big love. I honestly will never be without a donkey again. Between the squeeking and the purring noises... I fell in love instantly and he reminds me daily why I love him :lol:

FatCatFarm
Nov. 24, 2011, 08:30 AM
Chirping is what I call those dear little noises they make sometimes when a full bray is not necessary.

anchodavis
Nov. 24, 2011, 01:13 PM
Cool thread! Our neighbor has a mini donk (named Eeyore, of course) and he is awesome. He's also about 34 years old!
I have been thinking about a mini donkey or a small pony that will get along fine with my pushy TBx gelding and my elderly free-lease warmblood-x mare. The problem I have is that with only two, when I take one out to ride, the other flips. The mare is not too bad about it, but my gelding goes crazy (I always stay within eyesight, but even just riding around the edge of the pasture he gallops around and calls the whole time). So I am looking for a sane sort who will inflict his or her equine Zen onto my two nutjobs. :)
My one concern with a small one though, is that we do have coyotes around where we live. My guys live out 24/7. Are coyotes aggressive toward mini-donks? What about a small pony (like Shetland-sized)?

PRS
Nov. 24, 2011, 05:18 PM
My mini donkey doesn't need grain at all...he gets a handful twice a day because the horses get it. I certainly wouldn't buy any just for him though. When I have to keep him up (usually in the spring and summer because I have too much grass and, being a creature made for arid places. he will founder) he gets a flake of hay twice a day. When I first got him he was really good a self trimming his hooves (he was intact and spent a lot of time pacing) now that he's a gelding he doesn't pace as much and needs trims roughly every 8 weeks. The farrier charges the same to trim his hooves as he does my big horses. Worming is cheaper since he only needs 1/2 a paste wormer at a time. Vet bills and vaccinations will be the same as for a horse though.

Re: the noises they make...I was very surprised by the variety of sounds my little guy makes. from grunts and squeaks to full out braying...he makes little happy noises too. My little donkey is the funniest little creature, it's hard to imagine how they can get that much personality into such a small package. He is out with the big horses, 2 geldings and a mare. He thinks the mare is his girlfriend and you'll never see him too far from her.

freshman
Nov. 24, 2011, 06:05 PM
Yes, but I'm sure your guy has a pedigree and likely very good structure. Most people in this area just don't care about papers. Some are registered, but most are not. Bred mini spotted jenny's go for $500, but that's without papers. Little jacks can be had for $150. $75 for a spotted jenny was really cheap though.

I think the price drop probably has to do with the relative novelty of mini donks in the early 90's than any sort of physical or genetic superiority of the actual stock.

Cindyg
Nov. 24, 2011, 09:16 PM
My one concern with a small one though, is that we do have coyotes around where we live. My guys live out 24/7. Are coyotes aggressive toward mini-donks? What about a small pony (like Shetland-sized)?

My prediction is that the donkey will be fine and the coyotes will be in danger. Donkeys are very aggressive against canines. People use them as guard animals with sheep and goats. The neighborhood strays learn quickly to stay out of your pasture.