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4Martini
Jan. 6, 2009, 11:21 PM
When you get multiples do they just form a pack and ignore you and take over the farm for their own, or do they entertain themselves? Just curious what people's thoughts are on having one dog vs. two?

fizzyfuzzybuzzy
Jan. 7, 2009, 12:11 AM
There are pros and cons to both. Having two is usually managable but the key to keeping them in line is to spend time with each alone and make sure you maintain your alpha status with both. The individual dogs and thier drives will also determine how well things go. :)

pandorasboxx
Jan. 7, 2009, 12:19 AM
Two. They need a bud and anyways, dogs are like potato chips. You can't have just one.

pintopiaffe
Jan. 7, 2009, 12:40 AM
I am NOT a dog trainer, nor do I play one on TV.

But I'll never have just one again, unless I get a different job where I'm home more or away for a shorter time at least.

Littermates can be an issue (fighting,) but aren't always. My best pair was a big black labbieX male and a small Aussie female.

I have three right now, which really is one too many, but how on earth do you choose... ;)

shakeytails
Jan. 7, 2009, 12:45 AM
Two. They need a bud and anyways, dogs are like potato chips. You can't have just one.

I agree, but you don't have to get two at once. The best dogs seem to happen when you're not looking or expecting it.

My Pyrenees took over the farm all by herself, and generally doesn't listen most of the time anyway (it's a Pyr thing!). She does buddy up with the neighbor's Pyr to patrol both farms, but neither one of them is a problem. I also have a herd of Corgis (6), but they're mostly penned up, supervised, or in the house so they don't count.

In the past, I've generally had two medium to large outdoor-only barn dogs. For the most part they'd sleep, patrol the farm, sleep, eat, sleep, etc. The only time I had a problem is when I had a pair of heelers. We didn't give them a job so they'd create their own- it usually involved herding the cows and attempting to herd the horses. They also thought finding a way to catch and kill my guinea birds was fun. I was not amused and ended up re-homing both of them to places without fowl. Those two were too smart for their own good.

For me, I can't imagine only having one dog. They are definitely like potato chips!

JSwan
Jan. 7, 2009, 07:16 AM
I've had 4 at one time.

Now I only have two.

Many years ago I had a young dog that I was having problems with, because I worked all day and he was at home alone. The vet suggested a crate, as did dog trainers.

I got another dog instead, and those two were the best of friends their entire lives. No crates, no prozac, no animal communicators or special diets needed. He just needed a friend. :sadsmile:

I hope I can always afford to have dogs and that I never have to keep just one, even though now I am home all day.

jeano
Jan. 7, 2009, 07:55 AM
Right now I have two old sister dogs and two 6 month old sister dogs. Oldie are lab mutts, babies are border collie mutts.

10 years ago we got littermates from the local rescue, then a singleton collie mix 4 years later. The collie was the best farm dog ever and we resolved to stick to herding mixes in the future because of that, with a plan for her to help raise her replacement after the labs passed on. It didnt work out like that, because our angel dog had liver failure and died at the age of six last August.

As it turned out, the old girls had really been leaning on the collie. They are so old and deaf they dont even hear the UPS truck sometimes. We didnt want to burden them with puppies but it has worked out really well, everybody doing well.

I think in a lot of ways multiple dogs are easier than one, and can sure provide a sort of insurance against heartbreak if you have a younger dog or two coming along as your seniors approach their end.

We definitely plan to get another pup or two within a couple of years to keep the canine workforce infused with new blood.

VWBug
Jan. 7, 2009, 08:00 AM
Two! If you pay attention to breed and personality getting two dogs is wonderful - they can keep each other company if you can't be with them. And if you're taking care of one you may as well be taking care of two. :)

I have three... two laid back types (a JRT and english setter) and a little JRT who charms the two boys into playing with her. They all came from shelters and they live in complete harmony with each other. They get alot of exercise because tired dogs = good dogs!

Bluey
Jan. 7, 2009, 09:13 AM
There are pros and cons to both. Having two is usually managable but the key to keeping them in line is to spend time with each alone and make sure you maintain your alpha status with both. The individual dogs and thier drives will also determine how well things go. :)

What FFB said.:cool:

Best, ideal, is if you get one dog at the time and train it a little to listen to you.
Then a year or two later you add another, that you also train alone until it listen well to you, as it is also playing and living with the other dog.
You will find that the second one will be much, much easier to train, because it will learn from the first one and you are a better dog trainer by then.

As you add more dogs, as long as they have a relationship with you, they will bond to each other but will also know to listen to you and so you won't have many problems.

How well all goes will also depend on the temperament and drives of each dog and how much you put into interacting with them.:yes:

Now, life is not always following the ideal pattern, so you make do with what you get.:)

I am allergic to dogs, so, although over the years we had many dogs around here, at times up to six, the last years, preferring to breahte a little better, I have only one.
Since it is with me practically 24/7, she really doesn't need another dog to play with at home, although she gets many other playmates with our dog club dogs and visitors.
She is a social butterfly, so there is no problem as far as socializing with other dogs.
A dog raised and living completely alone may not learn to be a dog and have problems around other dogs from that.

Getting adult dogs from a shelter makes the process of adding dogs much simpler, as you have an adult dog to train already and those learn extremely fast, in a few weeks, not months.

I would not get two dogs at the same time, as a good training program will be harder to manage, when bringing one at the time you can get a start on one first, right as you go on with your life.

KnKShowmom
Jan. 7, 2009, 09:34 AM
I have never had just one dog so when we decided to get a puppy for DD we got 2 black labs (1 male, 1 female) from the same litter. Everyone said we were crazy and they would be wild, but I have to say it has been the easiest and most fun experience I have ever had with dogs.

House breaking was a breeze - we used crates and a precise schedule and literally had just 4 puddles between the 2 of them. Training went just as well because it was almost as if they were competing with each other to see who could complete the "task" (sit, park, come, stay....) first.

I have ended up with 2 of the best Labs - no chewing, jumping, wild or neurotic behavior they can be known for, which I truly believe is because they have each other. And for the record - the sibling dynamics have been the best part - they don't fight, each has his/her own status and "jobs" (male is inside watchdog, female has the outside), both respect me as the alpha female and they have their own games which are more fun to watch than anything on TV most nights.

You haven't lived 'til you've lived with a Lab and I will never have another one unless I can have 2!

Bluey
Jan. 7, 2009, 09:54 AM
I have never had just one dog so when we decided to get a puppy for DD we got 2 black labs (1 male, 1 female) from the same litter. Everyone said we were crazy and they would be wild, but I have to say it has been the easiest and most fun experience I have ever had with dogs.

House breaking was a breeze - we used crates and a precise schedule and literally had just 4 puddles between the 2 of them. Training went just as well because it was almost as if they were competing with each other to see who could complete the "task" (sit, park, come, stay....) first.

I have ended up with 2 of the best Labs - no chewing, jumping, wild or neurotic behavior they can be known for, which I truly believe is because they have each other. And for the record - the sibling dynamics have been the best part - they don't fight, each has his/her own status and "jobs" (male is inside watchdog, female has the outside), both respect me as the alpha female and they have their own games which are more fun to watch than anything on TV most nights.

You haven't lived 'til you've lived with a Lab and I will never have another one unless I can have 2!

Looks like you did a great job and have great dogs.:cool:

How old are they now?

jetsmom
Jan. 7, 2009, 10:17 AM
For the last 10 yrs I've always had more than one. I have 4 now. All previous strays except for an 11 yr old Golden/Lab that the owner couldn't keep contained, so he chased cars, got hit by cars, wandered, and bit someone at the barn.

Don't get littermates. There can be problems with them. I'd also not get 2 puppies at once.

I've had my other dogs housebreak the new dog, help give confidence to fearful new ones, and generally show them "how we do things here". They all get along, play together, sleep next to each other, yet still be there for me when I want to give them individual attention.

I think if you have more than one, walking them together helps a lot, in keeping them all thinking like a pack. Also, it is necessary to teach them each to have a good recall. All 4 of mine can be playing, but I can call one to me, if they are getting a little too wound up, and things immediately settle down. You can't just get another dog and let them keep each other company with no individual time with you, grooming, patting and walking.

But I'll never have just one dog again.

KnKShowmom
Jan. 7, 2009, 10:23 AM
Looks like you did a great job and have great dogs.:cool:

How old are they now?

Thank you - they will be 4 on Valentine's Day!

bdj
Jan. 7, 2009, 10:27 AM
I have three - my big guy (9 yo Border Collie/Lab? mix) and the Corgi girls (one turns 7 in February, one turns 3 a week later).

Personally, I like having multiple dogs around, but I think if you're going to have two - have one male and one female (and neuter both of them). Same sex pairs can work, but generally, they seem to be much more volatile than mixed pairs. My girls occasionally squabble, but neither one of them challenges my big guy.

ilikridn
Jan. 7, 2009, 10:30 AM
We have 5!! They range in size from 100lb lab/golden mix all the way down to 6lb Pomeranian. We had 4 but found one running by the side of the road and had to pick him up... a hound dog/weiner dog mix. He is the cutest thing and probably the sweetest dog of the pack. (Other 2 are a terrier mix and a Jack Russell -- my soulmate dog and shadow). As for them packing up and ignoring me... no way! They follow me all over the farm and have so much fun. I am their leader, for sure.

I think (hope!) we are maxed out with 5.... 5 is a lot.

SkipHiLad4me
Jan. 7, 2009, 10:35 AM
I don't find that more dogs is really more work - it just requires you to be more firm as their pack leader :)

We have 4 dogs and although sometimes it feels like 3 too many, I wouldn't trade any of them. The two younger Lab boys stay outside during the day and run each others' energy off while we're at work. The two older girls, Lab and Boston Terrorist, are content to just stay inside and nap during the day ;) We have a strict routine for them at food time and for coming and going from the house. They know the deal. Otherwise they'd be unmanageable.

I would definitely get two, just so they can keep each other company while you're not around. But if you don't take the time to work with them, they will run your farm ;)

Carrera
Jan. 7, 2009, 10:39 AM
My parents have 3 Standard Poodles. They are a pack... 2 are fine, but 3...watch out! They took down a deer last winter. They were hunting machines on the farm! Now that they live on a 1/2 acre lot they are squirrel and mole hunters. The girls are breeding dogs and are Grandma, daughter and baby, ranging from 2 to 9. The 9 year old is retired and a pet!

I currently have one, but I am waiting for dog #2 from the breeder, a Redbone Coonhound, for my SO, yep I think that I am crazy. A Weim and a Coonhound... and I will be getting a second weim in the future...

5
Jan. 7, 2009, 10:49 AM
When you get multiples do they just form a pack and ignore you and take over the farm for their own, or do they entertain themselves? Just curious what people's thoughts are on having one dog vs. two?

Don't know about other breeds but I have two pyraneese (great work ethic BTW- not the breed for everyone) and they take shifts patrolling. So if you can, get a pair and give them a job.

Auventera Two
Jan. 7, 2009, 11:10 AM
I have 3, and no, they don't just form a pack and ignore you. Unless of course you weren't the pack leader to begin with. ;) :cool: I could probably never have just one dog. I agree, they're definitely like potato chips. I love watching the crazy nut job things that my 3 do. They are all very distinct breeds with distinct personalities and if you have a very balanced household with balanced dogs, you should have no problem whether you have 1 or 10.

MunchkinsMom
Jan. 7, 2009, 01:07 PM
In the past 30 years I have always had at least two dogs.

Four years ago we merged families, and my in-laws and my family moved to a farm. They had two dogs, we had two dogs, now we had 4 dogs. All female, and all got along from day one.

Last year two of the older dogs died within 6 days of each other, one was mine, one was the in-law's dog. A month later we got two aussie/golden cross puppies from a rescue, yes, littermates.

It has worked out great, the pups were easy to train, and have livened up the lives of the older dogs (one is 10 the other is 8).

I find they don't have a pack mentality, we find them in various places all over the house napping. The only times they act as a pack is if a delivery man shows up on the property and at meal time.

We also have a dog-door and 1/2 acre fenced for them to come and go as they please and be dogs.

Fairview Horse Center
Jan. 7, 2009, 02:06 PM
I guess I will be the lone voice. I have always had at least 2, but I only have one now, a lab, and I just LOVE it. I can really enjoy her. She has great company with the cats - often curled up with one. She is also one to never wander. When I had multiples, they would go exploring the next fields, like my farm was bigger than 40 acres.

Larksmom
Jan. 8, 2009, 02:55 AM
I have one old dog, she's fifteen or sixteen now. She lost her lifelong buddy this last year. I live alone, and she is left with the two old cats while I am at work. We had several rough months at first, but she has suddenly 'gotten it' about piddling on the wooden floors, and just being a better house dog. I know she is lonely but I worry about getting another dog. Jealousy and all that. I am sort of waiting to get another but would like a dog that might bark at a burgular, and not lead them to the silver! Any suggestions? {on whether or not I should get one or not?] It would strictly be a pound dog, so I do NOT want to have to return it.

JaneeneSings
Jan. 8, 2009, 03:38 AM
Hold on to your hats: I have SEVEN dogs! :eek: Ok, five of them are house/yard dogs and two are LGDs (Great Pyr/Anatolian) so they're not all running in the woods as a pack! The LGDs are neutered brother and sister and are fantastic at their job of protecting our goaties -- it's amazing to watch them work as a team. :yes: The rest of the mutts are couch potatoes, but I love them all! ;) When people ask what breed my dogs are I say, "I have one of each...." :cool:

witherbee
Jan. 8, 2009, 07:56 AM
I have 3 females and they are just the best and happiest dogs and very in tune with me. Since we live on a farm, the have jobs and like the routine of going out to feed the horses and then checking tghe fencelines with me when the horses are in the barn eating. I have had 3 females before as well and my girls were best buddies. I prefer having at least one older dog (the "big sister" and alpha female after me) and then having at least one younger dog. The older dog teaches the young ones and it's a great way to keep peace and pass on all of those wise older dog traits. I personally prefer the hunting and herding type dogs, so I currently have an older Chesapeake Bay Retriever (she's 8), a young Pembroke Welsh Corgi (she just turned 4) and we got a lab/hound mix last year from the Humane Society and thought she was old (very gray muzzle and quiet/scared demeanor) but she is only 4 years old. All of them totally look to me and listen to me and I can take all 3 at once on leash any where (and do!). They are great at the dog park and are off leash on our farm all day every day (I do have a Dogwatch Hidden Fence system, which is good because the lab/hound mix is a wanderer!).

Good luck, and the key is just to get dogs that are compatible and make sure you nip any jealous or food aggressive type behaviors in the bud right away. Be very aware of any favoritism and be the pack leader to both. Allow them to set their own place in the pack, but intervene if you see something that could cause strife (like making sure they keep to their own dog beds and don't let them push eachother out of their food bowls).

I love my 3 girls and also enjoyed just having 2. One is fine, but I like all of my animals to have at least one of their own kind around.

county
Jan. 8, 2009, 09:20 AM
I have 3 dogs the English Bulldog libves in the house the Black Lab and the Border Collie cross outside. We have no problems with them they stay on the farm and never leave. They do check out the 140 acres each day that are here with the buildings but never cross the road onto our other land.

JanM
Jan. 8, 2009, 11:19 AM
I had an older female who was settled and mellow (Min. Schnauzer) and got a 3 yr old (or so) male Min. Schnauzer from the pound and they did get along great. The female had the privileges (bed sleeping) and he accepted his place (he's a bed hog) on the dog bed below (after Mindy died he moved up to the bed) and he played tons more than she did, but they did get along. I thought that when the female died he would grieve but he seemed really accepting of the entire situation, and he's been an only dog since (about 6 years now). I asked him and he didn't want a brother or sister. He's my last dog until I retire, and he's pretty old and quiet now (or as quiet as a schnauzer gets).

FatPalomino
Jan. 8, 2009, 01:37 PM
Another supporter of two.

And I am happy to help you find an amazing rescued puppy or adult if you like. ;)

We have 5- one stays with me all the time (and I foster a 2nd dog for companionship when at school). 4 are always on the farm. The puppies do play pretty hard with each other and "do their own thing". But, if you wanted to play with them, they would gladly play with you ;) It's good... they wear themselves out playing so we don't have to wrestle and run for an hour morning and night with them. :)

I've seen a LOT of behavior problems be helped by adding another dog ;)

Beware... sometimes it will be hard leaving *only* one at home. This is the reason we got a 3rd dog.. to leave one at home with a companion. But then we wanted to take 2 dogs with us... so then we got 4...

Bluey
Jan. 8, 2009, 02:14 PM
---"Beware... sometimes it will be hard leaving *only* one at home. This is the reason we got a 3rd dog.. to leave one at home with a companion. But then we wanted to take 2 dogs with us... so then we got 4... "---

Do you need a reason to get another one?:winkgrin:

Larksmom
Jan. 8, 2009, 03:39 PM
FP, I thank you but sadly, there are PLENTY of pound puppies everywhere.:sadsmile:
I used to tell people I had an old horse, she was 35 when I put her down- two years ago this week!,
two old dogs, two old cats, and an old mother. Now I am down one horse and one dog, and mom and the cats are getting shaky. Maybe I should get another dog. It might cheer up the remaining dog. Since I am off work Friday, I may go pound shopping tomorrow!

CHS
Jan. 8, 2009, 06:28 PM
Yes I have 8 dogs. I don't know how that happpened, but it did. There are fights now and then, but nothing terrible. For the most part they all get along. My oldest female jrt is the boss of the house which is great because she likes calm and quiet. LOL When the others get rowdy, she puts them in their place. None are food aggressive and they take turns at the food and water bowls. They are all "house/farm" dogs except for one who just stays at the house. I'm sure they would drive some people over the edge but I'm used to them, and deal. LOL

Penthilisea
Jan. 8, 2009, 08:25 PM
Ok so what would you all reccomend to me? Small lot (>5 acres). Multiple indoor only cats. Would one cat friendly dog first then adding a second once the routine was in place be ok? Do multiple dogs tend to be more pack-ish around cats and smaller animals then singletons?
I was spoiled rotten with a spoiled rotten Heinz 57 shelter dog during my adolescence and early adulthood who was just a giant loveable mush pile. Gave the cats plenty of room and loved everyone he met.

Cindyg
Jan. 8, 2009, 09:06 PM
When you get multiples do they just form a pack and ignore you and take over the farm for their own, or do they entertain themselves?

IMO, yes, if you get two dogs at the same time, they will bond to each other and not to you. It's great fun watching them play, and it's great that neither puppy has to be alone. But when we did this, neither dog bonded with us humans until one of them passed away. Sad but true.

If you want two dogs, my advice is -- get one and get it totally bonded to you. Then get the second one. Don't get littermates.

Bluey
Jan. 8, 2009, 09:34 PM
Some people get two dogs at the same time, even two puppies and are lucky and all goes well.
But, enough of those people that got two had problems training two dogs together, so now we are aware that too many times it didn't work, too many to not warn people about it.

There can be problems also with dogs started well, individually, of different ages and sexes and seemingly compatible for many years, but that is rare.

If someone wants to try their luck and get two, why not, but the odds are either way that over the years all will work fine, so why take those chances with the well being of all in that family, humans and dogs?

4Martini
Jan. 8, 2009, 09:45 PM
Another supporter of two.

And I am happy to help you find an amazing rescued puppy or adult if you like. ;)


Ha Ha. Actually our dog went back to her Rescue as part of their Alumni Boarding Program (She came from a prison rescue and she got to spend Christmas with the Prisoner who trained her while we were out of town.) They called to tell us that she made a friend and asked if we wanted to meet him. We decided right now to say no, as we have a lot going on right now. But, I started thinking about and and thought I'd ask the question. The responses are really interesting. I'm jelouse of those of you with lots of dogs!

Bluey
Jan. 9, 2009, 07:13 AM
Ha Ha. Actually our dog went back to her Rescue as part of their Alumni Boarding Program (She came from a prison rescue and she got to spend Christmas with the Prisoner who trained her while we were out of town.) They called to tell us that she made a friend and asked if we wanted to meet him. We decided right now to say no, as we have a lot going on right now. But, I started thinking about and and thought I'd ask the question. The responses are really interesting. I'm jelouse of those of you with lots of dogs!

Well, no problem then.
You already seem to have one good, well adjusted dog.
That seems a good time to add another, when you find one and the time to pay a little extra attention to both, until all know the new routines.:)

Hannahsmom
Jan. 9, 2009, 07:36 AM
Ok so what would you all reccomend to me? Small lot (>5 acres). Multiple indoor only cats. Would one cat friendly dog first then adding a second once the routine was in place be ok? Do multiple dogs tend to be more pack-ish around cats and smaller animals then singletons?
I was spoiled rotten with a spoiled rotten Heinz 57 shelter dog during my adolescence and early adulthood who was just a giant loveable mush pile. Gave the cats plenty of room and loved everyone he met.

For me, I would definitely get one dog first to make sure the dog was "cat respectful". I struggled for years with a JRT rescue who thought all cats were varmints. Only very tough barn cats could hold their own so I had to keep the dog leashed and on a very tight rein around any cats. My previous dogs had all been introduced to cats as puppies and the cats taught the puppies to be respectful. To be safe, I'd suggest starting with one dog as two could think it was a real game and then depending on the breed it could be not so good. I say this and will admit I have a friend who had multiple cats and got two mixed breed littermate puppies who were raised around her cats and never had a problem. So it is up to you. I would think with one puppy it would try to play with the cats and you may find that one dog is enough.

CHS
Jan. 9, 2009, 08:58 AM
Were brought into the house at different times. I never got two at the same time. Yes they can be "packish" but a stern knock it off, brings them back to reality. They aren't packish in a bad way, they don't go after people or other animals, they just like to run and play together. I am the boss and they all know that. I can single one out of the pack at any time, and they will come and sit at my feet when told. It's all in how YOU handle the situation. My word is law no matter what the other dogs may be doing and they all understand and respond to that. You have to make sure each individual dog knows YOU are the boss. Sara my older JRT is second in command. LOL They all mind her just as well as they mind me. She knows my rules and makes sure they follow them even when I'm not there.

If you are Firm, Fair, and Consistant with both dogs you will be fine.

vacation1
Jan. 10, 2009, 05:17 PM
I like having one dog at a time. Each dog is very close to me, although each has had other humans and animals they bond with. I don't have anything against adding a second dog, but I don't want the added financial burden (which would impact the care my current dog gets, inevitably) and as the youngest in a large family, I'm well aware how most animals who can voice their dissatisfaction feel about the addition of new siblings :lol:

Because of the strong multi-pet response, I just wanted to offer a slightly different POV. I used to frequent dog forums, which is a natural gathering place for people who are very, very big animal lovers. I began to realize after a while how many people with multiples simply couldn't afford them. As long as everything went great, they were fine. But one sickness or accident meant disaster. Frankly, I think a lot of the people were teetering on the verge of hoarding. I don't mean to imply that everyone with multiples is a hoarder or neglectful, of course. Just that adding animals means reducing resources for any one animal's care, and that's something that seems to get glossed over with too many animal lovers eager to fill their homes with pets.

buschkn
Jan. 12, 2009, 08:28 AM
Vacation raises some good points.

That said, I have FIVE, just got the 5th. That is a bit much, but it's the whole potato chip thing. I don't think I would ever have just one dog again, unless I truly couldn't care for 2+, and was home all the time. All of mine are rescues and have been obtained at different times and have done well. I have also helped re-home probably 10 or so other various rescues and strays, and they have all gotten along fine in the household with everyone else. I think if you pick your dogs carefully (and I don't mean breed, actual DOG) you can have well adjusted well socialized happy dogs who are cat friendly, too. My cat basically just sits there and gives any new dog a dirty look like he's flipping him the bird and they get the idea pretty quickly. :)

Sounds like another prison doggy might need a new home for the new year. I doubt you'll regret it!! Good luck. :)

Thomas_1
Jan. 12, 2009, 09:09 AM
My wife says you should never have one dog, always two as a minimum.

Then she says if you've got 2 then you might as well have 3.

Then look what happens!

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v258/flodden_edge/dogs/f0c1.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v258/flodden_edge/dogs/f0c1.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v258/flodden_edge/dogs/1492.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v258/flodden_edge/dogs/7632.jpg

They do and will play with the other dogs but you always have to be in a position where you as the owner are the pack leader. As such they should always want and look for your attention.
The most we've had is 11. Now we have retrievers and with them you are guaranteed never to be neglected or feel lonely or neglected. Indeed I've never been able to go anywhere without at least one of them tagging along. But then retrievers are totally fun loving people dogs.

Bluey
Jan. 12, 2009, 09:23 AM
You want to get another idea of dog pack dynamics?
Here:

Temple Grandin "Animals Make Us Human"

Jealoushe
Jan. 12, 2009, 09:25 AM
My parents always had 5 dogs, now they have 4 and I have one. They entertain each other and don't run in a pack ever. They are all different breeds so I don't think they have the same mentality to pack together.

KnKShowmom
Jan. 12, 2009, 09:36 AM
IMO, yes, if you get two dogs at the same time, they will bond to each other and not to you. It's great fun watching them play, and it's great that neither puppy has to be alone. But when we did this, neither dog bonded with us humans until one of them passed away. Sad but true.

If you want two dogs, my advice is -- get one and get it totally bonded to you. Then get the second one. Don't get littermates.

Our brother/sister Labs have "their" relationship, but they are know who they belong to - female is DD's dog and male is mine and they know it! The sibling dynamics are very different and much better than that of a "pack" of dogs introduced at different times. We NEVER have had a fight between them, but heaven help the dog that wanders onto our property because they have the tagteam thing down to a science!

We were a bit cautious about getting siblings, but my brother had done it and gave me the pros/cons and we are very glad we did. Just have a set schedule, be organized (and use crates), and make sure they have physical and behavioral boundries set from the start - they will only run as wild as you permit.

okggo
Jan. 12, 2009, 09:38 AM
I've always been a believer in at least 2 (so they have company when the humans are gone), but lately I've been wondering about 3.

Mainly because I recently lost my 14 year old lab and got a Mastiff puppy. She absolutely adores my 8 year old lab, they are incredibly attached in ways the other 2 never were (the other 2 tolerated eachother but weren't exactly friends). Now I'm absolutely paranoid about how the puppy would handle life if something happened to my lab (who is sadly getting more crippled by the day, bad hips and muscle atrophy).

So my conundrum is, get one now, so when something happens to him she won't be suddenly alone, or wait. And the other question is what to get. I love my lab and have always have labs, but the Mastiff is by far the best dog I've ever had. My lab was a PITA to house break, chewed on everything, it was probably 1 1/2 years old before he started to calm down. At 8 he is near perfect, but now his health is going down hill. The Mastiff had never been in a house before we got her and she never once had an accident in the house, doesn't chew (knocks wood like crazy here), and is really the easiest puppy I've ever had to train. So logically I'd like another, but they are BIG! She is 118 pounds and just turned 8 months old. I wouldn't mind it so much if we only had 2, but with 3, that is a lot of dog. Small dogs...I have little tolerance for. Too hyper. So I've been thinking about a King Charles or Basset as they are supposed to be a little milder tempered, but I don't really dig the grooming and hounds can be very nose motivated....

Anyway, giant ramble, but to answer the OP, def more than one.

KnKShowmom
Jan. 12, 2009, 09:47 AM
When we got our Labs, we confined them to the kitchen/laundry room with baby gates until they were done teething and then gradually introduced them to more of the house. They always had plenty of toys (Kongs) when they felt the need to chew so we have had zero chewing of anything else.

The crates also made housebreaking much easier - 2 dogs - 4 puddles - 0 piles :D

After we stopped using the crates, we would leave them in the laundry room during the day with barn boots (and the cat) and never had a problem and now they just hang out in the house while we are at work each day.

okggo
Jan. 12, 2009, 09:55 AM
The crates also made housebreaking much easier - 2 dogs - 4 puddles - 0 piles :D



I read this and chuckled. My current lab was quite determined NOT to be house broke. When he was a puppy I worked a night shift and my roommate day, so he basically had us with him 24/7 to work on the outside for bathroom. If we put him in the crate for even an hour to go to the store, he would press his butt against the bars and crap. We would get home and find poop on the floor/carpet outside his crate, and not a drop in it. We ended up putting newspapers under the crate about 8x5' to catch the flyers. I swore after him I'd never get another puppy (although before him my stats were similar to yours). My 14 year old I just lost I adopted from a rescue at 8 years old (I'm such a softy for old dogs, esp. ones people abandon :( ).

Our Mastiff is a dream. She was bred out in an outdoor kennel, wormy, kind of a mess when we got her, but not one accident and she is most definitely a house dog. Fluffy toys dont' stand a chance around her though, lol.

KnKShowmom
Jan. 12, 2009, 10:15 AM
Fluffy toys dont' stand a chance around her though, lol.

When we went to pick up our pups from the breeder, we took fleece toys to rub on their mother and they adored them until Maggie decided she wanted to see what made them squeek! :eek: After that it was Kongs all the way in every shape and size.

Last year for Christmas, DD insisted that we try the fleece toys again and Smokey is in heaven. He meets us every night at the back door with one of those toys in his mouth and won't leave you alone until you acknowledge that it is a "nice toy"! Maggie isn't very interested in toys, she would rather have a good belly rub but she also seems to have gotten over the shredding phase so they got 2 new ones for Christmas again this year.

chai
Jan. 12, 2009, 10:28 AM
Interesting thread. I have been trying to decide if we should bring home another dog. We lost our dear Kuvasz after 14 years this past November and the house seems very empty without her. We have a cute but dysfunctional Min Pin who came from an abusive home. Both dogs were rescues, but the Min Pin came to us after we took in the Kuvasz, and the Kuvasz was so gentle with her, they became very close. When my sister was stying with me last year, she brought her puppy, and the Min Pin became so anxious, she developed physical symptoms that the vet had to treat with a mild sedative.
I have always taken in dogs that needed a home, but I am worried about taking in another after seeing the reaction our Min Pin had to a cute little visitor that was with us for about a month. I miss having a big dog to work on the farm with me, but do I dare bring another dog home and risk upsetting the Min Pin, who is now getting up there in years?

kellyb
Jan. 12, 2009, 10:31 AM
I have two dogs. There are pros and cons. I wouldn't say they run as a pack and ignore me, though.

The obvious con is that it is twice the food, twice the work, twice the poop picking up, twice the toys, vet expenses, etc.

The pros though is that I think it made dog #1 a lot happier when I got dog #2. They have each other to play with. They provide endless hours of entertainment. And I get twice the lovin' :D

Rhyadawn
Jan. 12, 2009, 11:42 AM
I have two, and while it works for me, I'm not sure I would do it again the way I did. I got my female first, when she was 15 months old. Then got my male a year later and he was 4. That was quite the dominance struggle for them.

2 is fun though, they entertain each other, and are just good company. They still love their mommy (read:they can't breathe without me in the room) and get lots of individial attention. The key to not having dominance and pack issues is to keep yourself at the head of that structure.

goeslikestink
Jan. 12, 2009, 12:45 PM
My wife says you should never have one dog, always two as a minimum.

Then she says if you've got 2 then you might as well have 3.

Then look what happens!

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v258/flodden_edge/dogs/f0c1.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v258/flodden_edge/dogs/f0c1.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v258/flodden_edge/dogs/1492.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v258/flodden_edge/dogs/7632.jpg

They do and will play with the other dogs but you always have to be in a position where you as the owner are the pack leader. As such they should always want and look for your attention.
The most we've had is 11. Now we have retrievers and with them you are guaranteed never to be neglected or feel lonely or neglected. Indeed I've never been able to go anywhere without at least one of them tagging along. But then retrievers are totally fun loving people dogs.


haha thomas the one in the background
looks like you ib the set of 3 goldies haha they do say dogs take after thier owners

puppies arnt they cute shes doing a grand job as they all porkey
can i name one as pokey -- cough, nah i had a little dog isued to wlak called pokey
always into things
great pics and lovely dogs in good condition love them all i bet it hurts when you have to give one of them pups up and i bet you make sure they will have homes with the very best
lovely dogs tom and sue

goeslikestink
Jan. 12, 2009, 12:47 PM
i did have three now i have 2 plus at odd times 1 extra as its debs and when she goes out he stays with us so i have gsd and jrt plus debs jrt x springer spanial

Vandy
Jan. 25, 2009, 10:10 AM
What a timely thread! I recently and unexpectedly lost my wonderful pit bull mix to a brain tumor. It's the first time in almost 20 years I have been "dogless". Most of the time, I had 2+ dogs, but once all had died but the pit, I stuck with one as I was starting my business and didn't feel like I had the time to devote to a second. New puppy is coming today!!! He's a boxer/hound mix who had a rough start - the "rescue" where he was born was shut down due to animal neglect and he has been living in a foster home for the past few months. He came to visit for the day last week, and he was neither scared nor agressive with the horses. However, I am worried that his nonchalance (and interest in eating manure) will draw him into a paddock where he'll get kicked or stepped on even if he's minding his own business...

I've gone back and forth between getting a second puppy at the same time, and when I've asked folks who are more dog-experienced than I am, I've gotten a wide range of responses, much like this thread. But it's this thread that has convinced me that I'll wait for a bit for a second, so thanks everyone.

Now if we could have a thread devoted to how to train a puppy around horses, that would be great...my former dogs have mostly been adult rescues, and they were either horse-safe or not, didn't seem to change with training. I'm really hoping this puppy will be a great dog to have around the barn, but I'm apparently much better at training horses than dogs...

baileygreyhorse
Jan. 25, 2009, 10:45 AM
I'm not sure how you guys deal with multiple dogs. We have one extremely brainless yellow lab. I'm so afraid that if we got another, it would be chaos. Either double the brainlessness or they would just gang up on me and never behave. I'm fairly new to dog ownership; really just testing out the waters.

Bluey
Jan. 25, 2009, 12:00 PM
What a timely thread! I recently and unexpectedly lost my wonderful pit bull mix to a brain tumor. It's the first time in almost 20 years I have been "dogless". Most of the time, I had 2+ dogs, but once all had died but the pit, I stuck with one as I was starting my business and didn't feel like I had the time to devote to a second. New puppy is coming today!!! He's a boxer/hound mix who had a rough start - the "rescue" where he was born was shut down due to animal neglect and he has been living in a foster home for the past few months. He came to visit for the day last week, and he was neither scared nor agressive with the horses. However, I am worried that his nonchalance (and interest in eating manure) will draw him into a paddock where he'll get kicked or stepped on even if he's minding his own business...

I've gone back and forth between getting a second puppy at the same time, and when I've asked folks who are more dog-experienced than I am, I've gotten a wide range of responses, much like this thread. But it's this thread that has convinced me that I'll wait for a bit for a second, so thanks everyone.

Now if we could have a thread devoted to how to train a puppy around horses, that would be great...my former dogs have mostly been adult rescues, and they were either horse-safe or not, didn't seem to change with training. I'm really hoping this puppy will be a great dog to have around the barn, but I'm apparently much better at training horses than dogs...


To answer your question on how to train dogs around horses, I will say that a good way is to train your dog, period and in that training to listen to you, to learn how to behave around horses will just fit right in with that.

A good way to train any dog you get, puppy or adult, is to go to a few obedience class lessons.
What is important there is not the behaviours they teach there, but that you and the dog learn to communicate and work amidst other dogs and people and that your dog socializes with others.
Those behaviors taught there are a way to learn to interact with you directing the action, as humans should, since we are the ones that know what the world is like and what is safe or not for our dogs.

You can take your dog to the barn from the start, as long as you don't let it do what you don't want it to learn to do.

At first, keep the dog on leash or confined, so it won't think it is there to enjoy itself in any way it wants to invent, but that there are rules to abide by.

We used to train border collies to work cattle, sometimes horseback.

When you train a herding dog, the dog already is born with the instincs to herd, so the training is to teach it to, while following his instincts, to listen to you for directions.

You can't turn a herding dog loose and expect it to know what you want to do with the stock.
If you leave such a dog running around on it's own around horses, it will get in trouble trying to follow it's insticts and the situation being not right, it may harm the horses or be harmed by them.
Even dogs without herding istinct are good at just plain chasing.

So, train and confine is the best advice to live happily thereafter with a dog.
The more you train, the more your can take your dog with you, knowing that it will act sensibly any place and listen to you when you ask something of it.