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wineberrywillie
Jan. 4, 2009, 06:56 PM
Any suggestions on how to keep 2 alpine goats at bay while the horses are turned out or brought in? We tried feed in a pail but both gobble it down & then make a dash for the gate. Forget pushing/shoving them. Goats live for that stuff & making matters worse, they have become more aggressive & bite...as in hard. Can't quarentine the little turds either....sigh

Any ideas?

CB/TB
Jan. 4, 2009, 07:10 PM
Have you tried putting hay out for them first, before turnout/bring in? I have 3 and I know they can be real pains! Sometimes diverting their attention with food helps .I can confine mine to a stall while I do stuff( vet/blacksmith, etc) but one of them can clear anything unless I shut the top door, too. . She must have been an open jumper in her former life! If you have people to help can you collar them and hold until horses are set? Not much help, I know . How about making them a smaller area you can herd them to while the horses are attended to , even if you had to use the open gate to channel them into the area.

craz4crtrs
Jan. 4, 2009, 07:21 PM
Dressage whip. A broom handle. My little guys learned really quick not to be nasty with me. Smacking them with a bucket has worked too. :lol:

Honestly, the goats weren't much of an issue, a tap with the whip, poke with the broom, whatever...they take it like another goat butting them. You are then the boss. :winkgrin:

We had to be really careful around our ram. Sheep are bigger and can hurt you. They learned to keep their distance from the gates with a whip, broom, etc, too. That old ram got bopped on the head with the bucket a few times when he was a brat.

I raised sheep and goats for quite a while and they had to learn manners just like any other resident. My daughter got butted by the ram once while bringing out feed and I went after him like a mad woman. He never tried anything ever again.

Grannie's Grey
Jan. 4, 2009, 08:58 PM
I knocked mine on the forehead with a wooden spoon. I think the hollow sound startled her, obviously it didn't hurt her. After a while I could say "Daisy, do ya want to get thumped?" and she backed off.

Go Fish
Jan. 5, 2009, 01:14 AM
Guard Corgi :lol:

Bluey
Jan. 5, 2009, 08:09 AM
That is why there are so many goats in giveaway lists.
Many people put up with them as pets only so long.:(

Add to the list that they love to play king of the mountain on top of cars.:eek:

We ran a goat dairy and kept our goats in their own goat pasture, all but a nice pet alpine and Billy, that was trained to be polite, unless you wanted to play with him, if you were foolish enough to want to be butted.
He had horns.:winkgrin:

We raised the kids by hand, with their mother's milk, but this way they were gentle, easy to handle when grown and learned to mind people.
Raised with their mothers, they tended to get very wild and harder to train to mind for the general public.

Get a border collie.:cool:

goeslikestink
Jan. 5, 2009, 08:23 AM
section a bit your paddock off, ie a corner as then its only 2 sides
and get some elecy tape and posts and an engeriser- then they wont bother you
and you can put there hay in, there bit and horses hay in there bit
then if you wanted to could add a little shelter for them so they are completely seperated to your horses but also out in the same field as your horses
look here.. this type of thing http://www.google.co.uk/aclk?sa=L&ai=C43MeogliSYXsBd6BjAfritmmBYL2rCjSlrWrAbDS4JoCCA AQAigDUJ-t0ZL______wFgu96dg9AKyAEBqQK0A7id2VW4PqoEGU_QXT74c Mn9KfA8sIrvMUbipu1vbb3pReA&sig=AGiWqty_nbGkjPeR3fYFVpeRCUQBrtr-dQ&q=http://www.saletrack.co.uk/scripts/stcc.asp%3Fcpid%3DAD9E8E7A%252DDEA1%252D4C6E%252D8 7DC%252DAB04D07F22DC

JSwan
Jan. 5, 2009, 09:05 AM
Your goats BITE? They don't have teeth on their upper jaw, at least in the front. Are they gnawing on you or just gumming you? Not that it matters but maybe I'm sheltered but I've never had a biter. :lol:

The only thing I can think of is that you have to secure them or segregate them behind a solid object. I have wire mesh fencing and my goats used to wear goat collars - I'd take a snap and hook one end on the collar and the other on the mesh fence, then let the horses in.

If your situation contributes to that sort of setup - you can set up a feeding station (maybe something like a stanchion or milking stand) and that's where they stay until it's time for them to be let out again. I've never had a milk goat but have had friends that do and their goats are trained to go into the stanchion to eat. They're tied there sort of like a tie stall for horses.

Hope that helps. geez - biters. I thought horns were bad but biters???? Sorry - that just makes me laugh a little. Goats can be evil. :winkgrin:

yellow-horse
Jan. 5, 2009, 12:04 PM
I have a little goat paddock in my horse paddock, just a simple fence they can get under away from the horses, thats where i feed them, when i don't want them messing around, i put a handful of feed out there and then tie them to a post, i don't leave them tied to the post without being out there, but if i'm going to be doing soemthing where i dont need the help of a goat, i tie them up

spook1
Jan. 5, 2009, 01:33 PM
I have 2 and no suggestions............BUT very interested in any!:winkgrin: I got mine to keep the horse company...only wanted one and got suckered into 2. They are cute and enteraining BUT a PAIN in the butt!:D

Woodland
Jan. 5, 2009, 05:42 PM
I finally gave my daughters Oberhasli show wethers to a petting zoo. I could not take their antics any more! I had no gardens left. They could open storage cabinets, raid trash cans, eat the neighbors trees, Climb or hop over any fence, endure any shock, - SICK OF IT!

wineberrywillie
Jan. 5, 2009, 08:34 PM
Thanks everyone for your sugestions. I did try giving them hay but it seems the activity at the gate is more interesting. Can't give them grain because they are little chubbers to begin with.
"Lucy & Ethel" (God help me), do bite & they bite hard! I don't care if they have only 2 teeth...something hurts when they latch on! We may have to bring them in & lock them in a stall while the horse activity goes on. Cropping the little sh*ts when we are at the gates is another option. I'm open for more suggestions.

yellow-horse
Jan. 6, 2009, 02:54 AM
yes, the dog also is a help, he's an aussie and it bothers him if goats are running amok, unfortunately i have to put him down sooner rather than later, probably within the next 2 weeks, he's still a working dog bless him, the day he doesn't want to do his job which is coming up, i'll put him down
my goats aren't all that destructive, i gave up trying to fence them in so removed the bottem rail, they go into the woods about 10 feet and take care of the fence line, the female will come up on the deck in the summer if we're in the pool, she finds that fascinating, we sun ourselves and have a cold one, i think because the dog hangs out in the pasture or on the porch, they don't go far

JaneeneSings
Jan. 6, 2009, 05:15 AM
I'll probably get slammed for this, but ...
I have a cattle prod. I have only used it once on a goat (I have 25), and now I just have to threaten its use and every goat backs off!

wineberrywillie
Jan. 6, 2009, 11:33 AM
Oh I have thought of a prod!! When it's 20 degrees, icy & just miserable out, the last thing we want is entertainment by the Lucy & Ethel show!! Even our part time mucker (well seasoned & a vet tech) refuses to step foot on the property. The owner is such a wonderful lady that I hate to bug her but these 2 are creating havoc & really, a dangerous situation for all.

Both goats were rescued by the owner of the farm. One goat was mauled by a dog when she was a kid & looking at her, you know something's not right. Ears & eyes are both off balance...even for a goat. Talk about weird looking & goats pretty much are odd looking when they're normal. The other goat is just plain deranged. Both chubbers have opposite black & white markings & have the attention span of about, oh, 2 minutes. Upon site of the poor soul bringing horses in or out, they waddle-run, bleating, no screaming the whole time, for the gate. Somewhere along the trip, one turns to the other & they head butt a few times, they may mount one another, then they continue the journey to the gate whereas they torment handlers & horses. If they weren't such a p.i.a, they'd be funny.

Bluey
Jan. 6, 2009, 01:06 PM
I would say the best would be to arrange for a goat pen.:yes:
There, they can be confined for their own good and to keep everyone else safe.;)

redhorse7
Jan. 6, 2009, 03:44 PM
Our two Alpines wear collars and since they are such food ho's, it's easy to clip a lead on them and tie them when we neeed to keep them out of trouble. One thing they don't do is try to mess with the horses feed pans. We have one huge STBD mare that HATES goats. Mama Alpine took a pretty good hit a few years ago and now gives them all wide berth.
Their pen is constructed of cattle panel and it works pretty well to keep them segregated. If they would stop eating their way out of the shed....well then we might be able to keep them penned up all the time and I would actually have landscaping:yes:

JSwan
Jan. 6, 2009, 03:57 PM
I'll probably get slammed for this, but ...
I have a cattle prod. I have only used it once on a goat (I have 25), and now I just have to threaten its use and every goat backs off!


Can I borrow it? I'm being stalked by a rooster named Chucky. Chucky is pretty close to becoming this Sunday's main course.

lcw579
Jan. 6, 2009, 04:15 PM
ROFLMAO! Sorry no advice, Wineberry, but your goat horror stories are hysterical! The visuals I am getting of Lucy & Ethel are priceless! Any chance you'll be posting pictures of the duo?

Having been tormented by one as a child I have a soft spot for "bad goat" stories. :winkgrin:

RubyLink
Jan. 6, 2009, 05:21 PM
Like some of the other posters said, we have collars on our goats so if we have to we can tie them or whatever.

Some of the goats we got as babies and they would nibble and jump on everything. We would keep a bottle of vinegar water handy and would spray them whenever they did something undesirable. They don't jump anymore and they only nibble a bit here and there.

Best thing you could do is build a goat pen. We set up electric netting that is very quick to set up and take down and it works great.

Good luck

wineberrywillie
Jan. 10, 2009, 11:10 PM
The below link should take you to Snapfish & pics of Lucy & Ethel, the delinquent goats. They really are cute but they are just baddddd.

Today's escapade involved my husband. Due to the icy roads, he drove our daughter over to the barn for turn in duties, hence, his introduction to Lucy & Ethel. You have to understand, my husband is by roots, a city boy (& Italian) so this is pretty much out of his realm of understanding. His tactic was to push them away. We all know, this is the ideal game for goats so naturally, this became the entertainment they had been wishing for all day. Either daughter was too involved with the hossies to worry about Dad, Lucy & Ethel OR she found the trio far to entertaining to step in right away. After a few minutes of Dad doing the whirling dervish with Lucy & Ethel, daughter made a break for the gate with the horses. Tommorow is another day!!


http://www2.snapfish.com/thumbnailshare/AlbumID=276898735/a=50869606_50869606/fromupload=true/imagecount=1/videocount=0/t_=50869606

equusus
Jan. 11, 2009, 09:33 AM
I have found that the best, by far, goat deterent is a spray bottle. Goats HATE getting wet.
For your situation, making a small holding pen from cattle panels would probably be the easiest way to keep them out of your way.
Good luck, we have a herd of 30 or so goats and they are a PITA when trying to take care of the horses!
april

wineberrywillie
Jan. 12, 2009, 10:39 AM
I have found that the best, by far, goat deterent is a spray bottle. Goats HATE getting wet.
For your situation, making a small holding pen from cattle panels would probably be the easiest way to keep them out of your way.
Good luck, we have a herd of 30 or so goats and they are a PITA when trying to take care of the horses!
april


Equusus, you gave me an "A-HA" moment! Spray bottle! That's why the little buggers stay in their house when it rains. Sometimes, the easiest solution is right under our noses! Thanks!

Go Fish
Jan. 12, 2009, 02:37 PM
When I was a teenager, my Dad went through the "Yikes, I'm 40 and I need a sports car" thing. He bought a shiny new, bright blue MGB convertible. Said goat gets loose and jumps on the hood of the car he'd bought only hours before. I panic, and start screaming at the goat and waving my arms; goat then jumps on the convertible top and BREAKS THROUGH into the driver's seat. He's stuck in there thrashing around, tears up the entire top, then to add insult to injury, poops on the driver's seat. The dealer, when presented with trashed car, didn't believe a word of it. America's Funniest Home Videos wasn't around back then...:lol:

wineberrywillie
Jan. 13, 2009, 04:05 PM
When I was a teenager, my Dad went through the "Yikes, I'm 40 and I need a sports car" thing. He bought a shiny new, bright blue MGB convertible. Said goat gets loose and jumps on the hood of the car he'd bought only hours before. I panic, and start screaming at the goat and waving my arms; goat then jumps on the convertible top and BREAKS THROUGH into the driver's seat. He's stuck in there thrashing around, tears up the entire top, then to add insult to injury, poops on the driver's seat. The dealer, when presented with trashed car, didn't believe a word of it. America's Funniest Home Videos wasn't around back then...:lol:


Darn! That could have been the $250,000 winner too!! Even tho I have kidded quite a few doe's, I am not a goat person. Don't ask. Call me a goat midwife & let's leave it at that. Anyway, I have no idea what is normal/abnormal goat behavior. One thing I do know, goats do not listen. So naturally, flailing arms & screams have no power over a goat who is determined to rampage a car. I would swear, that goat knew what he was doing too!

Bluey
Jan. 13, 2009, 05:46 PM
When I was a teenager, my Dad went through the "Yikes, I'm 40 and I need a sports car" thing. He bought a shiny new, bright blue MGB convertible. Said goat gets loose and jumps on the hood of the car he'd bought only hours before. I panic, and start screaming at the goat and waving my arms; goat then jumps on the convertible top and BREAKS THROUGH into the driver's seat. He's stuck in there thrashing around, tears up the entire top, then to add insult to injury, poops on the driver's seat. The dealer, when presented with trashed car, didn't believe a word of it. America's Funniest Home Videos wasn't around back then...:lol:

That may be the best goat story I have heard yet, better than our elderly neighbor so proud of his brand new Cadillac, when those were the best you could buy, pulling up to see his race horses in training and walking out of the barn and seeing Billy licking his car, ran at him and scared him right over the back, up the top and down the hood, leaving scratches and marks all over it.:eek:

Seems that goats think that a straight line is always best, even if they have to go over whatever is in front of them.:winkgrin:

Quin
Jan. 13, 2009, 09:04 PM
I have found that the best, by far, goat deterent is a spray bottle.


You get better distance and a stronger 'deterrent' factor with a water pistol - like a Super Soaker type.

JSwan
Jan. 13, 2009, 09:07 PM
That's the BEST story!!!!
:lol::lol::lol:



When I was a teenager, my Dad went through the "Yikes, I'm 40 and I need a sports car" thing. He bought a shiny new, bright blue MGB convertible. Said goat gets loose and jumps on the hood of the car he'd bought only hours before. I panic, and start screaming at the goat and waving my arms; goat then jumps on the convertible top and BREAKS THROUGH into the driver's seat. He's stuck in there thrashing around, tears up the entire top, then to add insult to injury, poops on the driver's seat. The dealer, when presented with trashed car, didn't believe a word of it. America's Funniest Home Videos wasn't around back then...:lol:

actcasual
Jan. 15, 2009, 10:32 PM
Parents do dairy goats. Worst. Influence. Ever.
My filly got pitched in with the goats during weaning. By the time she was two, she'd take your arm off to get a banana peel.

keana
Jan. 15, 2009, 10:54 PM
Equusus, you gave me an "A-HA" moment! Spray bottle! That's why the little buggers stay in their house when it rains. Sometimes, the easiest solution is right under our noses! Thanks!

Yes I was going to say this, it should work goats hate the rain or getting wet........I used to work with a petting zoo with 500 of the little buggers, if it worked to keep them away from little kid's feed cones it should work....

HorsesinHaiti
Jan. 15, 2009, 11:01 PM
I finally gave my daughters Oberhasli show wethers to a petting zoo. I could not take their antics any more! I had no gardens left. They could open storage cabinets, raid trash cans, eat the neighbors trees, Climb or hop over any fence, endure any shock, - SICK OF IT!


No garden here either. Goats are left to range free in the dry season to eat whatever they find.

I call them rats with horns:mad:!

wineberrywillie
Jan. 18, 2009, 03:38 PM
The squirt bottle worked!! Yahoooo! No more wrestling the "rats with horns" at 7:30 in the morning when it's 15 degrees or at 5pm when it's dark & all I hear it their bleating. Even the horses are done with their obnoxious behavior & beginning to nudge them when they get close.

Thanks everyone for your help!