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hrfponies
Dec. 31, 2008, 06:25 AM
I have been looking at run in sheds for some time now and they are so expensive!! I have some boarders(Men) at my barn that said they would help me build one instead. Has anyone ever built their own run ins? Any advice or even blue prints you can give me?

Bluey
Dec. 31, 2008, 06:33 AM
Advice?

-Consider making them on skids, so portable and tying them in place.:)
That is what we have done and have moved some by dragging or hauling them several miles here and there as our needs changed.

-Consider putting them where horses can get around the whole of them, as at times horses prefer to stand in front of it, other times behind it, depending on the sun/shade, wind/rain/snow and insects.

Blueprints are not really necessary, just take pictures of those in your area that have stood to your weather and you like and most anyone can make them from the picture.

Size will depend on how many horses you want to house.

Izthatrt
Dec. 31, 2008, 06:45 AM
I have built all my own run-in shed here. 5 of them so far. The hardest thing is to get them perfectly square, but I get better as I go. The best thing I have done is to use the Environ(not sure if that is the correct spelling) for the roof. They sell it at Lowes and its a rubberized ,corregated type panel. SO much easier and cheaper in the long run than the plywood, shingle thing. Also, if you don't have a nail gun, rent or borrow one!
True story. We finally decided to build a shop for my SO here on the farm. Logical place for it was in my smaller field w/the 12x24 run in..So..we cut it off from the base, built a skid, and MOVED it(using the neighbors huge tractor to pull it) over into another field. Couldn't believe it held together. Anyway, by the time it was done, it was dark so we figured we would put in a post at each corner and sister them to the original posts the next day. Of course that is the night we had a huge windstorm and went out in the morning to find the shed upside down on the roof. We , again, got the neighbors tractor and flipped it back into the correct position. I got to watch about 10 men stare in awe at a building that a woman put together, stand that kind of punishment w/ very little damage.
Good luck!

IronwoodFarm
Dec. 31, 2008, 06:49 AM
Mr. IF has built 3 run-ins. The latest one is a 2 story job.....I'd call it a stable but he says it's a 2 story run-in. What I can tell you is that Mr. IF never built a shed in his life before he started ours. He drew his own plans. It's not that hard. The end result are three nice sheds that have held up well over time. So I would say to the OP, go for it.

On the matter of having a shed on skids and being moveable, that's fine as long as its fairly small. If you are trying to provide the shed form more than a few horses, it becomes impractical. Also consider your terrain. My place is very hilly, moveable sheds work better with flatter terrain.

I would suggest building a shed that is deep enough to place a round bale feeder in it. We do this in the winter to keep the hay dry. It works very well.

I think the OP is lucky to have boarders who want to build a shed. It is much cheaper if you can do it yourself.

Bluey
Dec. 31, 2008, 07:42 AM
We build them out of metal in our barn, the frame out of pipe for the runners and metal building barn for the sides and roof.

When we need a larger one, we put two together, as those two 27' x 12' here:

http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a298/Robintoo/Horses2-20-07412.jpg?t=1230726934

We built them in our barn and dragged them into place with the tractor.
These two were for the cattle pens and 30' x 12':

http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a298/Robintoo/Horses2-20-07481.jpg?t=1230727247

hrfponies
Dec. 31, 2008, 08:41 AM
Thanks for the replies!!! Do you think a 10X20 would be large enough for two mares and foals???

SillyMe
Dec. 31, 2008, 08:50 AM
We did the same as Bluey. We used metal pipe to frame it, then drug it into place before putting up the sheet metal. I lined the inside of mine with plywood. We actually built 3 - 12x12s then pushed them together. Just in case we want to separate them out later.

Be sure to anchor them into the ground once they are set. The wind in Texas has been known to blow them over!

Bluey
Dec. 31, 2008, 08:52 AM
You may consider what material you will make them from and then make them the closest to the size of material you will use, so you won't have to cut so much and have many little pieces of waste material left.

I would say that is the minimum size for two mares and foals and that is assuming that they get along very well, that one won't fight the other and keep her off the shelter.

You will find that most adult horses will prefer to use the shelters only for wind protection and insect protection in the summers, as flies are less active in the shade.

When it is raining, our horses sometimes stand right in front of the barn, in the rain, when they could step a few feet in there and be dry.:p

Foals will frequently use sheds to take naps.:cool:

Bluey
Dec. 31, 2008, 08:56 AM
We did the same as Bluey. We used metal pipe to frame it, then drug it into place before putting up the sheet metal. I lined the inside of mine with plywood. We actually built 3 - 12x12s then pushed them together. Just in case we want to separate them out later.

Be sure to anchor them into the ground once they are set. The wind in Texas has been known to blow them over!

For horses, we do line them with 3/4" exterior plywood, although the metal we use is very thick and I doubt a horse could kick thru it, it is not the old, flimsy corrugated metal we used to have many years ago.

We dig a hole on each corner, drop a chain with a large bolt horizontal on the bottom, add a few sacks of concrete mix and bolt or weld the other end of the chain to the frame of the shed.
We have not had one tied in like that blown away yet, but we have had some tied to a post take a few tumbles.

county
Dec. 31, 2008, 08:58 AM
I've made 7 of them from 12 x 12 to 32 x 64 their very easy to make and you can save alot of money doing it yourself. The one thing I tell people to do is to build a pad of fill dirt to build them on. So often I see sheds built on flat ground and have water in them from rain run off. Also build your shed in muliples of 4 feet to save lumber costs so I'd go 12 feet wide rather then 10.

ponygirl
Dec. 31, 2008, 09:03 AM
I have built all my own run-in shed here. 5 of them so far. The hardest thing is to get them perfectly square, but I get better as I go. The best thing I have done is to use the Environ(not sure if that is the correct spelling) for the roof. They sell it at Lowes and its a rubberized ,corregated type panel. SO much easier and cheaper in the long run than the plywood, shingle thing. Also, if you don't have a nail gun, rent or borrow one!
True story. We finally decided to build a shop for my SO here on the farm. Logical place for it was in my smaller field w/the 12x24 run in..So..we cut it off from the base, built a skid, and MOVED it(using the neighbors huge tractor to pull it) over into another field. Couldn't believe it held together. Anyway, by the time it was done, it was dark so we figured we would put in a post at each corner and sister them to the original posts the next day. Of course that is the night we had a huge windstorm and went out in the morning to find the shed upside down on the roof. We , again, got the neighbors tractor and flipped it back into the correct position. I got to watch about 10 men stare in awe at a building that a woman put together, stand that kind of punishment w/ very little damage.
Good luck!

[/I]
Izthatrt- are you talking of Ondura? http://www.ondura.com/ If so, this is what we used for our roofing material for our barn. Good stuff.

hrfponies
Dec. 31, 2008, 09:10 AM
I would like to make mine portable, how do you secure it down then??? I know the one poster said make a hole and put a chain done etc..... any other ways??

birdsong
Dec. 31, 2008, 09:38 AM
We build them out of metal in our barn, the frame out of pipe for the runners and metal building barn for the sides and roof.

When we need a larger one, we put two together, as those two 27' x 12' here:

http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a298/Robintoo/Horses2-20-07412.jpg?t=1230726934

We built them in our barn and dragged them into place with the tractor.
These two were for the cattle pens and 30' x 12':

http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a298/Robintoo/Horses2-20-07481.jpg?t=1230727247

You guys are PROS!! Is that metal welded?

Nipntuck
Dec. 31, 2008, 09:40 AM
Ours is 12 x 24 or 15 x 24, can't remember, but it's plenty big for a round bale feeder and horses on either side of the feeder. Now it's holding the winter's supply of round bales with one rolled to the front so that pasture's horses can reach one, but not any of the other bales! My husband and a boarder's husband did it in a weekend. We used treated posts and treated 2x8's around the bottom, regular pine band boards at the top and middle and for the roof trusses and heavy duty metal for the siding and roof. We did not line the inside with wood and haven't had a problem with damage to either barn or horses. We only have 3 horses in that pasture at a time so that minimizes the conflict.

GoneAwayFarmCT
Dec. 31, 2008, 09:48 AM
Depending on your local zoning and how picky your assessors are, building even a largish run-in on skids means that it's classed as a 'portable' building, thereby avoiding having it added to your property taxes. At least that's how it works where we are. Your mileage may vary!

draftdriver
Dec. 31, 2008, 10:39 AM
Thanks for the replies!!! Do you think a 10X20 would be large enough for two mares and foals???

No. The alpha mare and her foal will be inside, and the other will be outside. My alpha mare could guard a full 60 ft. of opening! I think 12 x 30 might work, if the mares are reasonably friendly with each other.

tidy rabbit
Dec. 31, 2008, 10:45 AM
My husband built this one, and I helped. I'm always the grunt labor.

He bought the roofing and the 6x6x12 posts, but otherwise he milled all the wood himself. It took us about a week to complete it. The trickiest part was making it a clear span, that required a bit of engineering.

http://pets.webshots.com/photo/2137587870048495570fUtuYk
http://pets.webshots.com/photo/2407509860048495570RJWMUA
http://pets.webshots.com/photo/2463776520048495570QGDvgB
http://pets.webshots.com/photo/2821435380048495570DfysvE
http://pets.webshots.com/photo/2635400600048495570CeXGxf

The horses use it all the time. I'd like to have one in each paddock eventually.

cyndi
Dec. 31, 2008, 11:25 AM
We hired our run in shed built, but I do have a suggestion for anyone wanting it to be shared amongst the herd. Ours is 12' x 36' with a 6' overhang. I had our contractor built 4' tall 'half walls' to separate it into 3 equal sized 'bays.' Now Alpha Mare can't plant herself in the middle and dare the lesser minions to seek shelter. Also second the suggestion to build up the ground, and I had several loads of sand spread on top of the fill dirt pad before we built it, since that makes nice cheap 'bedding.' You might even spread some crushed concrete along the front opening under the 'drip line' from the roof if mud is likely to be a problem. Ours drains away so that's not a problem but if it were, that's what I would do.

tidy rabbit
Dec. 31, 2008, 11:28 AM
We also built ours up with clay, then fill dirt, then packed it. Put about 10 tons of pea gravel down, then let that pack, then put another 8 tons of limestone screening in on top of that. Now it's well draining and soft enough for a good roll.

Bluey
Dec. 31, 2008, 03:44 PM
You guys are PROS!! Is that metal welded?

My neighbor is a welder by trade, very handy.:cool:
We welded the frame, well, he did most of it, as I had my arm in a cast that time and then screwed the metal on.
We did weld ours, but there are kits you can buy that come with the frame ready to bolt, for those that don't weld.
All metal barn companies around here will sell kits with whatever measure you give them.

When welding you need to add reinforcements before you go dragging them, so they don't wobble too much over the bumps, that is what those extra reddish bars in that one were, that you cut off with a grinder with a cutting blade, after you set the sheds down.
Either that or cross chain them with some boomers.
Where we put two together, we only finish opposite sides on each, so the middles are open to fit together.
Then we add a portable pipe panel there, so it really makes two bays, so two different groups can fit there without anyone hogging it completely.
There, the panel also divides both pens when we close the gates, as that is really our roping steers pen.
The horses were there during the day, while we were expanding their own barn.
You may be able to see the panel in that one picture with two together.

To tie portable sheds down, you can put posts there on each corner and tie to them.
We used railroad ties for that with one shed, a tornado came by and flipped it over the ones on the back, breaking one and the shed went on tumbling, ending on it's roof.:eek:
It didn't hurt it any, other than a scratch or two. We stood it up again with the tractor, which was scary and this time tied it down with our chain and concrete anchors.
I would not worry about that, if you don't have tornadoes.;)

shawneeAcres
Dec. 31, 2008, 03:51 PM
For cost, durability and quick erection (by someone else!) you cannot beat the metal "carports". We have built our entire barn structure that way (as well as doing runins in the past). The company we use here is Carolina Carports. We designed what we wanted, and in TWO DAYS it was up, we then went in and built the stalls. You can see some pics on our website below. Our main barn is a 100' x 20' building, has an enclosed feed room (10 x 20) at one end with a rollup door and a regular door (that was done by the carport crew). You can choose siding and roof colors. We had previously built our own barn at our last farm from scratch, same style, but this was SO much better. And you won't believe the cost you can do it for!

ayrabz
Jan. 1, 2009, 09:52 AM
Shawnee A:

Looks as if you've done exactly what I'm interested in---I would love to be able to learn a bit more (!!) I'll send you a pm....

shawneeAcres
Jan. 1, 2009, 11:47 AM
My DH made two for me this summer. Each cost us $600 to make. Materials are pressure treated lumber - 4x6s for base, 4x4 for corners of frame, 2x4 for interior of frame. Saltblock style roof (longer and lower in back; short and higher in front) is 1/2" plyboard base with tarpaper under asphalt shingles; shed sides are T1-11. Nothing particle board! The outside dmensions are 8x8x10 (at peak).

It took DH about 2 days to build the frame and put on the siding (T1-11), 1 afternoon for us to shingle and tack on the metal trim to prevent the ponies from chewing on the edges of the framing.

Andy (in first picture) was supervisor for his run-in, and became a bit of a pest trying to get inside and stand in the frame, pretending it was finished. We had to run a rope across the front to discourage him. Once his was finished, he instantly made it his "home away from stall."

The second shot is Libby in her run-in (built after we finished Andy's). When this shot was taken we still needed to put the shingles on and finish the trim - otherwise, this is how it looked when finished. :)

While these are pony run-ins, the plan is the same for run-ins for larger horses.


These two pics are confusing me. In the first construction pic, the four by four corner posts are off the ground on blocks and meet the footer board, yet in the second completed photo the corner four by fours appear to be "sunk" into the ground. Can you explain this please, thanks. Always looking at construction and ways to do things, so quite interesting to me to know how this was done

ReSomething
Jan. 1, 2009, 02:39 PM
My Mom and I built ours when I was a kid. She designed it so that the roof sloped away from the opening and built it in 4 x 8 multiples in order to waste as little plywood as possible. We did end up with a mud problem, the shelter was on a hill and we couldn't truck anything to it nor divert enough water away from it. It was one and a half sided with a big acacia (can't kill them, we tried) for part of the side. I hated the mud so much I put a floor in - rough sawn 2" Doug Fir -wood floors were not uncommon in barns back then, and doubled the roof. When the horse went the wood was reused for a deck and stairs.
It wasn't hard to build, digging the postholes, cutting and hammering, that's about it.
I would say that orientation is important - you want to keep your sides in between the horses and the prevailing weather, facing the opening to the South will keep it warmer in winter, and I'd build with a shed roof rather than a peaked roof - first off there is less cutting and figuring, and second it won't direct roof water to the open end of the shed and down your neck when you walk in. If you can't buy long enough boards for the rafters you'll have to go with the peaked roof so it may be a moot point. Have fun, I remember me and my horse standing in my shed with the floor and no mud and the rain and the wind blowing, and she was happy and dry and I built that.

Sing Mia Song
Jan. 1, 2009, 06:56 PM
For cost, durability and quick erection (by someone else!) you cannot beat the metal "carports". We have built our entire barn structure that way (as well as doing runins in the past). The company we use here is Carolina Carports. We designed what we wanted, and in TWO DAYS it was up, we then went in and built the stalls. You can see some pics on our website below. Our main barn is a 100' x 20' building, has an enclosed feed room (10 x 20) at one end with a rollup door and a regular door (that was done by the carport crew). You can choose siding and roof colors. We had previously built our own barn at our last farm from scratch, same style, but this was SO much better. And you won't believe the cost you can do it for!

I see that your barn is open to the elements--do you think it could be enclosed with wood sides and still have enough ventilation?

shawneeAcres
Jan. 1, 2009, 07:16 PM
I see that your barn is open to the elements--do you think it could be enclosed with wood sides and still have enough ventilation?

The backside of my barn has windows that drop down, we are just now finishing them, see below album, which shows the barn from summer 2007 when we first began it, thru the building phase and then the "now" pictures (some showing the drop down windows):

http://community.webshots.com/album/569459911nWMeoO

We live in a very hot, humid climate, and ventilation is of prime importance. I leased a fully enclosed center aisle barn with HUGE doors one summer, prior to building our first barn (the "predecessor" to the one we have now, but same basic design) and it was a hot box. I would much rather have a barn that is cold but ventilated and gives good shelter from elements that a barn that is closed and hot.

Izthatrt
Jan. 1, 2009, 10:12 PM
ahh..Pony girl!! thats the stuff..Ondura....duh...well I was close. I love the stuff, easy to work with, pliable and affordable.

shakeytails
Jan. 1, 2009, 11:11 PM
Building a run-in shed is really pretty easy- just basic carpentry, no plans/blueprints necessary. I think the most boring (and most important!) step is setting up the batter boards to ensure a square building. If none of your "help" knows how to do this, then they might not be the best choice to build a shed. This is the one we built this past summer- http://pets.webshots.com/album/568355204kCGBUa . It's 12' x 24' and about 7' high at the back. We used 4x6 PT posts except for the center post which is a 6x6. The framing lumber is dimension lumber (bottom boards are treated) 'cuz DH HATES to frame with rough-cut. The roof is metal, and the siding and inside kick boards are rough-cut oak from the Amish. Of course the oak shrunk some, but being in KY I don't need the shed to block all the wind. As you can see from the pics it does need a load of gravel to raise the floor level up, and a coat of paint, and we could have made it a bit fancier, but it works just fine as is and only cost about $800.

One thing to consider is prevailing weather. My shed had to be in the middle of the field b/c it had to face that direction to avoid rain 98% of the time. Had I put it on the fenceline it would have been at the bottom of a hill and never would have stayed dry.

One more thing- if you're going to use metal (or ondura) use screws- long screws- to fasten it down. Nails have a way of working themselves loose over the years.

Tom King
Jan. 2, 2009, 09:28 AM
For tying portable structures down you can buy "tiedowns" for mobile homes at Lowes and Home Depot that screw down into the ground. If you have a tractor auger, an adapator can be fabricated to go on the post hole digger that you can screw them in and out of the ground with. The ground has to be soft with moisture in it. I don't know how people that set trailers screw them in.

PonyPile
Jan. 2, 2009, 10:58 AM
Wow, these are some gorgeous sheds people :)
I built my own, it looks nothing like these.

Bluey
Jan. 2, 2009, 04:40 PM
For tying portable structures down you can buy "tiedowns" for mobile homes at Lowes and Home Depot that screw down into the ground. If you have a tractor auger, an adapator can be fabricated to go on the post hole digger that you can screw them in and out of the ground with. The ground has to be soft with moisture in it. I don't know how people that set trailers screw them in.

You can rent the little gas powered gizmo that screws those mobil home anchors down, that looks like a gasoline two man post hole auger, or do like I did, use a long tamping bar and spend 20 minutes on each screwing them in.:rolleyes:

Notice, a big wind came and those big, 3' long, 6" wide anchors sheared right at the top of the ground and the shed went tumbling.

Now we dig a hole, put in a chain in there with something horizontally on the bottom of the chain and pour concrete mix sacks in there.
We have never had one of those pull up or shear, yet.

TrotTrotPumpkn
Aug. 14, 2012, 05:25 PM
Building a run-in shed is really pretty easy- just basic carpentry, no plans/blueprints necessary. I think the most boring (and most important!) step is setting up the batter boards to ensure a square building. If none of your "help" knows how to do this, then they might not be the best choice to build a shed.


I want to be the foreman, and I don't know what a batter board is...uh oh! LOL.

TrotTrotPumpkn
Aug. 14, 2012, 05:28 PM
ahh..Pony girl!! thats the stuff..Ondura....duh...well I was close. I love the stuff, easy to work with, pliable and affordable.

I need to re-roof (or roof over) the detached 2 stall garage/shed on my farm. This stuff looks like it might be a good candidate! You get it at Lowes?

The Crone of Cottonmouth County
Aug. 16, 2012, 01:53 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by hrfponies :
Thanks for the replies!!! Do you think a 10X20 would be large enough for two mares and foals???

No. The alpha mare and her foal will be inside, and the other will be outside. My alpha mare could guard a full 60 ft. of opening! I think 12 x 30 might work, if the mares are reasonably friendly with each other.

I concur. My 12' x 24' shed has a 12' porch, making the total covered area 24' x 24', and my alpha mare wouldn't let another horse in there if it was Secretariat pulling a cart of alfalfa.

Also, I heartily second the poster who suggested elevating your shed on a pad. It's totally worth it, which I found out the hard way.

PeteyPie
Aug. 16, 2012, 02:28 PM
As you can see from the pics it does need a load of gravel to raise the floor level up, and a coat of paint, and we could have made it a bit fancier, but it works just fine as is and only cost about $800.

I love the look without paint. That soft grey weathered look gives the structure a vintage look that is very appealing, especially with the rough-cut siding.