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KingstonHill
Dec. 29, 2008, 08:06 AM
One of my hunters just will not gain weight on Grow N Win, I have tried everything adding beet pulp, oil, etc. I have asked two trainers what they feed and they both said "Senior". Has anyone fed senior to a young (hes 8) horse and had good results. I was thinking triple crown brand...any suggestions would be great! Thanks

Rayman421
Dec. 29, 2008, 08:26 AM
I currently feed Triple Crown Senior to a yearling and a 4 yr old. They are doing great on it. High in fiber, easy to chew and digest (especially since these are ponies) and enough protein and nutrients they need b/c they are also show ponies. There is no difference in "Senior" and other feeds, if it has the ingredients you need. It's just marketing.

Auventera Two
Dec. 29, 2008, 08:59 AM
Have the horse scoped for ulcers. Hard keeper with failure to gain weight, regardless of the calories consumed is the number 1 symptom, well, that and colic. My Arab was such a hard keeper, she was eating 3 and 4 times what the others ate. She could put away a whole 50 lb. bale of alfalfa a day, plus 2.5 gallons of soaked beet pulp, a couple pounds of grain, plus all the treats I could feed her, and she was "barely" holding weight. I could see her ribs after a long ride. After the Gastrogard treatment, the weight gain improved - 50 lbs. in one week. Then another 25 lbs or so over the next couple of weeks. She still is a harder keeper, but nothing compared to pre-ulcer treatment.

JB
Dec. 29, 2008, 08:59 AM
What is the rest of their diets? Why do you feel they need to gain weight? It's not a bad thing for horses their age, especially the yearling, to be a smidge ribby.

I wouldn't go to a Sr feed right away. They *tend* to be higher in sugars, though TC is better than many. I would be revising the current diets to be more suitable to young, growing (working?) horses. How much beet pulp did you try? Have you tried alfalfa pellets or oats? How much hay do they get?

amdfarm
Dec. 29, 2008, 09:04 AM
I sometimes have to flip flop between Youth and Senior depending on what the feed store has available. My horses range from long yearlings to a coming 23yo and include a breeding stallion and broodmares. They all seem to do well on either feed actually and they have hay 24/7 in their round bales. I don't feed the Youth or Senior alone either, it's mixed w/ alfalfa pellets and oats.

GL

pintopiaffe
Dec. 29, 2008, 09:11 AM
You'd want to top of vits/mins. At 8, I'd use something like Platinum Performance or Foxden's Linpro. A YOUNG (i.e. growing) horse you'd really need to pay attention to vits mins and calcium/phos ratio.

Having said that, I loff TC Sr best. ;)

ponyjumper4
Dec. 29, 2008, 09:40 AM
I feed some amount of TC Senior to all my horses ranging from 1.5 years to 21. TC Senior I love because it is a complete feed and is low in sugar/starch (11% NSC). The TC Senior and TC Growth or virtually the same feed with very little difference. They made the "growth" because people would't buy the bag that said "senior" for the youngsters.

ladipus
Dec. 29, 2008, 09:47 AM
One of my hunters just will not gain weight on Grow N Win, I have tried everything adding beet pulp, oil, etc. I have asked two trainers what they feed and they both said "Senior". Has anyone fed senior to a young (hes 8) horse and had good results. I was thinking triple crown brand...any suggestions would be great! Thanks

Gro N Win is just a ration balancer low in calories...its not meant to feed for weight gain...but buckeye also makes Ultimate Finish that is recommended if additional calories are needed.

That being said senior feeds often are great choices for weight gain and hard keepers-Triple Crown Senior is excellent-its already beetpulp based,is soft,palatable,and most horses seem to like it-it contains 14% protein, 10% fat,and 17% fiber and is low in NSC(starch/sugar)...it also contains probiotics which help aid digestion. Make sure your horses teeth are ok and make sure he's up to date w/ his deworming schedule-that also contributes/helps w/ weight gain. Aside from that like somebody else mentioned ulcers could be prohibiting your horse from gaining/maintaining weight, and feed as much high/good quality hay as he'll eat.

ladipus
Dec. 29, 2008, 09:51 AM
Triple Crown Senior has one of the lowest NSC around even compared to many other feeds:

http://triplecrownfeed.com/news-soluble-carbohydrate-levels.php

KingstonHill
Dec. 29, 2008, 10:21 AM
He is getting about a scoop of dry beet (then soaked) and as much grass hay as he can eat. He also gets about 9 hours turnout a day. I think I will get him some senior and mix it with beet.

goodgal
Dec. 29, 2008, 10:50 AM
He is getting about a scoop of dry beet (then soaked) and as much grass hay as he can eat. He also gets about 9 hours turnout a day. I think I will get him some senior and mix it with beet.

I have fed all of my horses the Seminole Senior most their lives, ages ranging from 4-20. If you look at the senior(in most brands), it has all the best ingredients and vitamins, etc. I know people that feed it to their competition horses and say they've never performed better.

Can you get the Seminole line of feeds? Because there is also the Perform 10 and 12 which is high in fat and can also help with weight gain. I feed it to my hard keeper, along with soaked t/a cubes and beet pulp in a separate bucket and he has gained weight.

BornToRide
Dec. 29, 2008, 11:04 AM
Throwing more grain at your horse can potentially do more harm, if he does have ulcers. I would not use grain. I would feed more hay, alfalfa, and BP instead, plus add some flax perhaps and focus on good gut health so the feed can be effectively utilized.

pintopiaffe
Dec. 29, 2008, 12:14 PM
The TC Senior and TC Growth or virtually the same feed with very little difference. They made the "growth" because people would't buy the bag that said "senior" for the youngsters.

This isn't entirely accurate. While they are great low NSC, high fiber, high fat feeds, the nutrient values DO vary, and the Growth has higher levels of amino acids, and crucial vits and mins for growth.

Unless your forage is excellent, I would not feed just a Sr. feed to a baby without topping off what's needed. There's a reason why one is for Srs and the other is for growth.

deltawave
Dec. 29, 2008, 12:25 PM
Bonnie pretty much grew up on Purina's Senior feed. :)

KingstonHill
Dec. 29, 2008, 01:53 PM
Has anyone ever fed progressives senior?

pines4equines
Dec. 29, 2008, 01:59 PM
I spoke with the TC rep a bit ago and she recommended TC Senior for my 9 year old horse. I did try it but the horses poo-poohed it so we're on TC Complete for now.

It was hard to tell if they were off their feed or poo-poohing so I switched to something they do eat so I can when they're eating or not...

DMK
Dec. 29, 2008, 02:38 PM
I have to disagree about sr food being high in sugars. It's just like all other mixed grains - you have to judge them individually. Some are, some aren't.

TC Sr and Seminole Wellnes sr are not (and my 17 year old and yearling both get it), but the regular seminole sr is higher in sugars - still not high, just not uber low like the wellness version.

mypaintwattie
Dec. 29, 2008, 02:52 PM
My vet suggested feeding TC Senior to my 5 year old to help her gain weight. I went with the straight beep pulp route instead.

dalpal
Dec. 29, 2008, 03:58 PM
Has anyone ever fed progressives senior?

I feed it to both my senior and my 7 year old (she is colic prone)....Let me say this for the progressive products.....My mare has colicked SEVERLY twice in her life...both times on Legends pellets.....she has NEVER once had an issue with either the Progressive Sr. or the the Diet Balancer. That speaks volumes to me.

I think the NSC in the pelleted form (which is what I use) is 22 percent and the textured is 24 percent.

I will say that my picky Sr isn't fond of the pelleted form...BUT, he gets high off of any textured feed, so I just throw in flax meal for taste.

ponyjumper4
Dec. 29, 2008, 04:20 PM
This isn't entirely accurate. While they are great low NSC, high fiber, high fat feeds, the nutrient values DO vary, and the Growth has higher levels of amino acids, and crucial vits and mins for growth.

Unless your forage is excellent, I would not feed just a Sr. feed to a baby without topping off what's needed. There's a reason why one is for Srs and the other is for growth.

I said virtually the same, not exactly. The guaranteed vitamin levels are exactly the same. The amino acid levels and some of the mineral levels do not match exactly, but they are are also not very different. For example the lysine in senior is .70% whereas in the growth it is .80%. I work at a Southern States and the reps will tell you the same thing--they vary slightly, but are basically the same. I would still top it off anyway as I don't know many growing horses that would eat enough senior or growth to get everything they need from it.

sansibar
Dec. 29, 2008, 05:18 PM
My 8 year old jumper was fed purina senior up until he was stall rested (too much sugar).

He was sooo skinny before we put him on it and it worked miracles now he is plump. :)

dwblover
Dec. 29, 2008, 05:45 PM
I feed Triple Crown Senior to my five year old thoroughbred. In fact our entire barn uses it, and we have all age ranges. I love it and so do my horses. My vet also told me it's what she recommends for horses with stomach issues because it is so easy to digest.

gypsymare
Dec. 29, 2008, 06:03 PM
Fed Equine Senior to a hot and hard keeping 7 year old Saddlebred gelding. He loved it, and put on weight nicely. Several people recommended that I try it for him and they were right.

PNWjumper
Dec. 30, 2008, 11:49 AM
My vet and my shoer both told me not to feed my horses senior feed.

My vet said "too much sugar" (though, as others have pointed out, I'm sure that's totally dependent on the formulation and brand).

My old shoer said that every time they'd move horses onto senior feed in his barn they'd start noticing the horses feet growing oddly (getting "ridge-y").

But again, I'm sure that there are some senior feeds that are great for younger horses. I'd just make sure to check the label carefully.

eventerdrew
Dec. 30, 2008, 01:27 PM
I feed Purina's Equine Senior to my 5 year old QH/TB rescue.

He came in with severe nutritional imbalance (40 horses on 20 acres doesn't pose a pretty picture) and he needed a complete feed, but not an energy builder. I had had success with E.S. with my older mare after she retired and put him on it. He has done GREAT ever since!!!

spacehorse
Dec. 30, 2008, 08:40 PM
My old shoer said that every time they'd move horses onto senior feed in his barn they'd start noticing the horses feet growing oddly (getting "ridge-y").



It probably isn't because they were switched to senior feed, it was because their feed was switched, period.

You can look at a horses feet and you can tell when they have had a feed change, or some sort of stressful event (fever, bad colic) because they have grown what I have always referred to, as fever rings.

Invite
Dec. 30, 2008, 09:27 PM
My vet wanted me to feed TC Senior to my baby and my young hard keeper (they were 1 and 3 when this started) as it has low %NSC and it gives them the calories they need with high fat. I have done it and have been quite happy with the results. I feed high quality timothy hay along with the TC Senior. My horses look fantastic and are perfectly healthy.