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View Full Version : What is your latest jerry rig at the barn?



pines4equines
Dec. 28, 2008, 03:16 PM
What

edited: Sorry, clicked a little fast here.

What is your latest jury rig at the barn? Duct tape, baling twine!!

Mine was duct taping the antenna back on the radio. And, a post is rotting so we tied it with twine in hopes it'll last till Spring?!?!?!

Bluey
Dec. 28, 2008, 03:43 PM
We were putting two panels together and the regular pins welded to the sides were not making them as steady as we wanted.
I found a piece of some 10" light rebar I had been using as a stake, to string our cord to get a straight line, bent it on the trailer hitch pin hole, with a length of pipe, into a U, to fit at the top, at 7' high, so out of the way of horses, connecting both panels tightly and still can be pulled out if we need to move them again.
Fits like it was supposed to be there:)

msj
Dec. 28, 2008, 05:41 PM
My hose reel is literally held together with baling twine. First the back wheels wanted to come apart so I tied them together. Then the handle on the reel fell back because the plastic do-hickies cracked that held it up. Ah baling twine to the rescue! Now the handle is back where it should be. Last winter when the back wheel problem surfaced, I figured I'd try to get the reel to limp along till spring when I could replace it. Well, spring came and went and the wheels were holding up just fine! :D Why do anything???

About 1.5 wks ago was when the handle collapsed. I'm gonna try again to limp to spring. Who knows, it might just last a couple more years! :D :D

pintopiaffe
Dec. 28, 2008, 06:28 PM
The barn. Literally.

65mph windstorms, three in a ROW, left my coverall barns destroyed. One actually was moved about 10 from where it started, and two of the tie down stakes pulled right out of the FROZEN ground. These barns have survived hurricanes with less damage.

Anyway... Replacement covers on backorder. I can't really afford custom covers right now... so the back barn is covered with a heavy silver tarp, 30 x 24'. Put up in a nor'easter (the start of one) and it's the wrong way. :sigh: BUT, I couldn't turn it as the storm was getting worse, so I anchored it and figured on a 'nice' day I'd fix it... found out it's more stable/secure the way it is. Whoda thunk? :confused: The side away from the wind (leeward?) ends about 2' above the ground... but that's ok because the snow and rain don't blow in that way. And I've got about a 3/4 front 'wall' that I don't normall have when it's in run-in mode. (I take the 'back' wall off to make it a run-in--essentially it's a roof and two long sides set up like this... normally it's 3 sides.) We had a fairly significant storm since then, and it survived that too. I'm hoping it'll survive the whole winter, as screwed up as it looks... it's warm and dry.

Plans are to put brand new 'barns' up next year, and retire the current 'barns' to run-in shed status. (I take the pieces and put them back together to make 14x16 run-in sheds. Pipe panels, plywood 'walls' and a heavy tarp 'roof.' The run-ins actually look fabulous and are super warm and wind-proof. )

Renascence
Dec. 28, 2008, 11:28 PM
Pintopiaffe wow you are really creative with your Cover it tents! haha I have $100.00 worth of heavy brown and silver tarps and cords in the trunk of my car that I was going to jerry rig and bolster up mine with! I am also in maine and since the dang things just survived these hellacious storms with just my ductape on all their joints and my husband doesn't want to help deal with these poopy run ins I will probably just return them and hope the tents stay up until spring...I never thought of salvaging these with wood sides in the spring... that is brilliant! Come spring I will have to ask you how to do this!

Today I jerryrigged two turnout blankets with fabric glue....after I pirated some straps and snaps off a little beat up one that doesn't fit my current horses that I never threw out.

2boys
Dec. 29, 2008, 08:08 AM
I have a toy truck under my water bucket to make it level.:cool:

birdsong
Dec. 29, 2008, 09:20 AM
Gorilla tape (great stuff!) on the top part of my trailer awning holding it together until I can get a replacement!! I think this stuff is going to replaced duct tape for me...

mayhew
Dec. 29, 2008, 10:47 AM
The barn. Literally.



Ditto. Our barn consists of two tractor trailers spaced 20 feet apart with a roof over the space in the middle. Pretty, it ain't, but even after yesterday's fierce winds (which managed to take out three healthy trees, remove the shutters from the house, and knock over a cast iron chiminea), it is still standing.

webmistress32
Dec. 29, 2008, 10:50 AM
horses broke two oak rails in the paddock / dry lot area.

I noticed that if I pulled the two pieces together the split overlapped. so I used a bunch of wire ties and "fixed" the rails.

doesn't look good and is only temporary but its holding for now :)

Briggsie
Dec. 29, 2008, 12:28 PM
Ready for a laugh???

the small pony broke his gate. So...I rigged two old dressage girths....braided bailing twine...secured it with some bull snaps....and Viola...
A stall gaurd was born!!

It looks so ghetto!

susanne
Dec. 29, 2008, 05:08 PM
I would be utterly lost without heavy duty zip ties. For me, at least, they work better than t-p0ost clips when securing no-climb fencing to t-posts on our temporary corral, and are fantastic for rigging canvas run-in shelters. We position them so the horses can't chew on the long end, or trim it close.

After our recent spate of extreme weather (extreme for Western Oregon, that is) my husband discovered that our second set of cable chains on our van had been damaged, and the excess length was flopping. Turns out the metal piece that secures it had been pulled straight. I suggested my favorite remedy of a zip tie, and what do you know --- success!

They're right up there with WD40 and Dawn dishwashing detergent!

Kementari
Dec. 29, 2008, 05:08 PM
I have just had to bungee-cord the muffler on my truck... :eek: Luckily I don't drive much (if at all), and it only has to hold till Friday - wish me luck. :uhoh:

As a sailor, though, I must give proper credit: the term is actually "jury rig[ged]" and comes from what one must do if one's main mast breaks. The temporary replacement, made of whatever materials one has at hand (since a main mast is too big to carry a spare), is called a "jury mast" - and since all the assorted bits which make a sailboat actually sail are called the "rigging," you get "jury rig" for a temporary fix put together with whatever one might have on hand.

Like my muffler arrangement, the jury mast is not nearly as sturdy as a real main mast, and so putting in at the nearest port (or nearest NAPA :winkgrin:) for permanent repair is the only reasonable (and safe) course of action. :yes:

atr
Dec. 29, 2008, 05:19 PM
I now have two corner posts that broke off at ground level lashed to three T-posts with baling string until spring comes... Pretty, no. Working, yes...

We have a saying in our house-- "Barry would be proud of you!"

Barry is the husband of a friend of mine who can literally Jury rig anything out of anything. The Salvage King, he is.

They had a quite extraordinary and very functional 4-stall barn built almost entirely out of wooden pallets.

pines4equines
Dec. 29, 2008, 09:00 PM
Kementari. Thank you for the correction on jury rig. You know funny thing is, I'd always said jury rig and then someone corrected me a few years ago and rather than looking it up, I believed them. But thanks for that, now if I see that person again, I can correct them!

Kementari
Dec. 29, 2008, 09:33 PM
Kementari. Thank you for the correction on jury rig. You know funny thing is, I'd always said jury rig and then someone corrected me a few years ago and rather than looking it up, I believed them. But thanks for that, now if I see that person again, I can correct them!

My pleasure - I am a trivia geek sometimes. ;)

When I told someone else the same thing earlier this year, and he said that he had always thought "jerry rig" was nicer because he assumed that "jury rig" implied something to do with tampering with the judicial system. :lol: He was happy to hear it was an innocent term after all (and even applied particularly well to the "repair" we were discussing, as it was to a sailboat :winkgrin:).

katarine
Dec. 29, 2008, 10:58 PM
my horse is wearing the leg out of a pr of pants from Old Navy on his noggin. Two ear holes cut into it, and only one eye hole...the other is covering an eye injury ;) the crotch seam runs between his ears ;)

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3246/3133343839_807a9e3270.jpg?v=0

li'l bit
Dec. 30, 2008, 12:28 PM
[QUOTE=katarine;3763272]my horse is wearing the leg out of a pr of pants from Old Navy on his noggin. Two ear holes cut into it, and only one eye hole...the other is covering an eye injury ;) the crotch seam runs between his ears ;)

Brilliant!!!!

katarine
Dec. 30, 2008, 01:54 PM
I think I was the only peep at Old Navy Christmas Eve buying pants for my horse :)

Sing Mia Song
Dec. 30, 2008, 02:49 PM
I tie up my horses' tails for the winter, but instead of buying the chi-chi tail bags, I cut strips out of an old pair of jeans, braided them into the tail, folded it up and vet-wrapped it. One month and still holding!

I also had the cover-all experience with a couple of the tent carports used as hay sheds. I didn't lash down the first one firmly enough and it wound up 12 acres away and 40 feet up on the trees (it came down eventually :lol:). The second one got lashed to rebar, but suffered a similar fate this summer after rains soaked the ground so thoroughly that it was like pulling push pins out of a corkboard.

I also agree with zip ties--I think they are even more useful than duct tape!

MunchkinsMom
Dec. 30, 2008, 05:25 PM
I have a few fence boards being reinforced with that black gorilla tape (my fences are painted black, so you can't really tell from a distance). I also used the gorilla tape to make a halter repair (the snap had ripped through the leather loop) and it has held up for 4 months now!

I also have some padded leg straps on my gelding's winter blankets (he had a rash on the inside of his legs that I didn't want the straps to rub on). I cut the toes open on some mens long tube socks, slipped them over the straps, and duct taped the ends to the leg straps.

Mendin Fences
Dec. 30, 2008, 05:48 PM
We had 60+ mph winds on Sunday and part of the wall of our indoor arena blew out. The bang boards are still there but 3 large panes of the wall came off.
It got "jerry rigged" (funny you call it that since our slightly disabled farm hand is named Jerry and his repair work is sometimes questionable) with some blue tarp that's not totally secured on top and was flapping around last night.
I walked my mare past it and lunged her at a trot going past it a few times until she was fine with it. Then I rode, and she was really good about it, she eyed it a few times when it started flapping but otherwise I was very impressed by her calmness. She's an OTTB mare and can be high strung, but I love her for not being spooky.

SuperSTB
Dec. 30, 2008, 05:53 PM
Nothing with horse stuff which is sooooo out of my New England-esk character. But then again I ain't livin thair no mo-air.

The chicken coop however.... Bought little chicks around Easter. Because they needed to grow under the lamps, kept them in the super long low and wide plastic storage tubs. When they outgrew the tubs (after first molting) we purchased 2 packs of the wire mesh storage shelves- you know the ones that you put together with plastic disks to for a shelf grid. Anyhow, we used clear packing tape and some shrink wrap around the bottom to keep the chick mess from getting out of their 'cage' in my house.

When chicks were old enough to be outside but still needed some protection- I added more of these grids. Thus they had a few 'additions'. Then came time to build the chicken coop. I purchased all the wood for the frame and reused the grids as the chicken wire. It's actually pretty decent looking. I couldn't believe how expensive a roll of wire was and I since I already had the grid panels... figured, might as well use them. People use them for bigger rabbit cages and such animals.

Jaegermonster
Dec. 30, 2008, 05:58 PM
I have just had to bungee-cord the muffler on my truck... :eek: Luckily I don't drive much (if at all), and it only has to hold till Friday - wish me luck. :uhoh:

As a sailor, though, I must give proper credit: the term is actually "jury rig[ged]" and comes from what one must do if one's main mast breaks. The temporary replacement, made of whatever materials one has at hand (since a main mast is too big to carry a spare), is called a "jury mast" - and since all the assorted bits which make a sailboat actually sail are called the "rigging," you get "jury rig" for a temporary fix put together with whatever one might have on hand.

Like my muffler arrangement, the jury mast is not nearly as sturdy as a real main mast, and so putting in at the nearest port (or nearest NAPA :winkgrin:) for permanent repair is the only reasonable (and safe) course of action. :yes:


I have also heard the term jerry rig, actually Jheri rig, in place of another less politically correct term. But I actually like the term and explanation jury rig much better.

My latest is actually very simple. I have a litter of 7 foster puppies here from Animal Control. We have them set up in the puppy palace on my front porch with a metal pen spread around to prevent escapes. I got them two of those hanging water bottles and hung them on the fence. They emptied one, knocked it down and the metal holder thing for it fell through the porch boards and we never did find it.
I took a piece of the wire off a bale of alfalfa, cut off a piece and made a new holder thing with my Leatherman.

chai
Dec. 31, 2008, 11:38 AM
Whether it is jerry or jury, I found a good solution to hy horse kicking his wall.

My draft horse paws the wall with his gigantic hooves when he is bored, hungry, lonely even though he has four other horses in the barn, or just sees me through the window at the kitchen sink and wants my attention. The 4 am wake up calls from him were getting old, so I called the local gymnastic supply and bought heavy duty tumbling mats which we bolted to the walls. They work great.

snbess
Dec. 31, 2008, 04:24 PM
My latest was on my snowplow (garden tractor with blade). I've used it so much already this winter and while plowing earlier this week, the nut on the bolt that keeps the blade adjustment lever (side to side) in place fell off...in the snow. I'm sure I'll find it in the spring. Since I didn't have another of the correct size to fit the bolt (which stayed on until I grabbed it), I took some fencing hotwire and wrapped it through the two holes several times. It's keeping things where they need to be for now.

Sandra

JeanM
Dec. 31, 2008, 05:19 PM
This morning I discovered that the post that holds one of the steel gates and a post further down the fenceline were victims of yesterday's raging wind.

The post on the line is now "braced" (HAH!) with two step-in posts and baling twine. The gatepost is sort of being held up, far from perpendicular to the ground, with a chain stretched to a convenient tree. Luckily I don't turn horses out in that paddock very much, and my mare is good about not pushing on fences so I can eventually trust her in there while I'm at home.

Fancy That
Jan. 5, 2009, 07:36 PM
We had a big storm coming in and our new blanket for our Belgian Draft hadn't arrived.

So I just grabbed the biggest blanket we had (size 82) and "adjusted" it so it fit. By adjusting, we grabbed the closest baling twine to "extend" the rear leg straps so it would actually fit on him!!

Thankfully, it is a HUG blanket, so the chest/neck/shoulder area was rub free and expandable.

He now has his gorgeous new customezed size 92 HUG blanket!

Gotta love Baling Twine!

Oh = I forgot - he ripped the 82 and we had to DUCT TAPE it a couple times over a couple days. It is now being repaird properly...LOL

Gotta love Duct Tape!

NMK
Jan. 6, 2009, 04:57 PM
This is not very timely but I put up my own hand-made "fly" curtains. They are basically the screening you put into sliding glass doors (fiberglass, so they're soft like curtains) with drape loops and hooks that hang them to a pvc pipe. They slide on the pipe to open and I use a blanket clip to keep them closed. the bottom is weighted with chains in a glued pocket to keep them still in the breeze.

Sure keeps down the flies that come through the barn. Two 10' x 10' doors cost about $100.

Nancy

EventFan
Jan. 6, 2009, 05:30 PM
my horse is wearing the leg out of a pr of pants from Old Navy on his noggin. Two ear holes cut into it, and only one eye hole...the other is covering an eye injury ;) the crotch seam runs between his ears ;)

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3246/3133343839_807a9e3270.jpg?v=0


That is clever! I've seen a similar thing accomplished with an old bra that had one cup on an eye injury, and the other cup cut out.

tabula rashah
Jan. 6, 2009, 08:20 PM
That is clever! I've seen a similar thing accomplished with an old bra that had one cup on an eye injury, and the other cup cut out.


Oh please tell us you have a pic of that !!!:lol:

EventFan
Jan. 6, 2009, 08:51 PM
I'm looking...I think I do!:D

katarine
Jan. 6, 2009, 10:44 PM
LOL we considered the Cross Your Heart solution but we need him to hold it shut, not open and protected. Shut helps, and this way, no stitching it shut, and I can eyeball his eyeball when I medicate him :)

But I messed up and let him party with Chippy New Years Eve. They had too much fun and Jake lost his pants. It's less than an acre turnout, no pants. BOYS! I had to hit Freds for more 6 dollar pants :)

Wanderluster
Jan. 6, 2009, 11:28 PM
My problem of finding a disker for tearing up a deeper level of sand without costing an arm and a leg was solved by reusing a post hole digger left in the orchard by past owners. When I first discovered it I was told by my cowboy neighbor to put it in the metal bin, the end with the point was rusted so it could not be attached or modified to fit other tractors.
This last weekend I asked my daughter's boyfriend to find a way to insert a metal pipe through the center opening that was obstructed by the rusted tip and find a way to drag it in front of the chain harrow so it would rip the footing and allow the harrow to redistribute the sand.
It works! After an hour spent with wrenches WD40 he managed to free the tip and insert a pipe through the opening inside the huge drill bit. I now have an unconventional disker that digs a furrow of about 3 to 4 inches and the footing it displaces is distributed to the chain harrow for a fluffier more even arena footing.
Praise be for computer geeks with an imagination, this cost $30 in parts and is completely functional. :D