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LaBonnieBon
Dec. 28, 2008, 11:26 AM
Talk to me about the best camera to buy for doing still shots around the farm as well as getting good jumping shots at horse shows....

I am pretty much thinking the Nikon D40 or D60 with an additional lens, but debating between the lenses. Before I go make a big purchase like this, please give me your input!!

Thanks!

NoDQhere
Dec. 28, 2008, 11:38 AM
We just got the Nikon D40 and love it. It is easy to use and I think it is going to be much better than a point and shoot digital. Ritz Camera has a really good package deal right now for the camera and two lenses.

LaBonnieBon
Dec. 28, 2008, 11:39 AM
We just got the Nikon D40 and love it. It is easy to use and I think it is going to be much better than a point and shoot digital. Ritz Camera has a really good package deal right now for the camera and two lenses.

Thanks! Because I have not a clue about cameras.... what is the difference between an point and shoot and the D40?

LexInVA
Dec. 28, 2008, 11:46 AM
Get the D60 with a fast, responsive lens. Preferably the AF-S VR Zoom-NIKKOR 70-200mm f/2.8G IF-ED if you can afford it. It's the Nikon equivalent of what many sports photographers use and the lens is great for portraits.

Rubs Not Pats
Dec. 28, 2008, 12:28 PM
I alternate between a D-300 and my old D-70. For an easier time use the D-70. You really have to know what you are doing with the D-300. For non zooming around the farm and close show pics I use a Nikkor 18-200 with my D-300, I sometimes use 28-300VR Tamron. I really bought that lens for the Galapagos but have used it with the horses. The 18-200 is pretty versitile. On auto focus, nothing compares to the Nikkor. The Tamron is slow. A couple of things to note, I like the bigger heavier camera, my hands have a tough time finding the buttons on the smaller ones. This is an issue if you use the cameras for hiking etc as it adds a lot of weight. Also the nicer thing about the D-300 is you can actually zoom in all the way on your pictures and check focus much better than you can on the D-70 and the screen is larger. While I was able to use the D70 out of the box. The D-300 required a book, the manual and an instructional video. I am not a pro. The D-300 offers a lot of optiona and alternatives that you really don't have on the D-70. Good luck, this can be a lot of fun.

Right on Target
Dec. 28, 2008, 12:47 PM
I'm not a camera professional by any means, but I have a Nikon D-50, which is the older model low end Nikon digital SLR. I really like the camera and it is very easy to use.

The lower end digital SLRs for non-pro's do have "point and shoot" features. You just put them on "auto" and the camera figures everything out for you (f-stops, etc). From there you can choose to learn more and use all of the features and customize your shots more, or you can just stick with the easy mode.

I have one lens that is 18-55mm and one that is 75-300mm. I like having both b/c you can get great wildlife shots and other distance shots with the 75-300, and you can get nice closer shots with the other lens.

I also like that Nikon uses SD memory. It is cheap and usable on other electronics.

Good luck with your camera!

janedoe726
Dec. 28, 2008, 01:21 PM
I love my D60, and I just got a Nikkor 55-200mm VR lens for Christmas, which I can't wait to use. While it is true that you can get decent shots on Auto, if you do invest in this type of camera (and they ain't cheap!!), I would strongly suggest a photography class. I took one at the local community college last fall and learned a ton! It was so worth it! I shoot entirely in manual now, as I can't stand the way the pictures turn out on Auto. Good luck with whatever you choose!! Oh, and I too recommend going through Wolf Camera. They are very helpful and have competetive prices.

RheinlandPfalzSaar
Dec. 28, 2008, 01:59 PM
The D60 is a good camera, it isn't a full frame sensor like film cameras, Nikon's full frame sensors start out with the D700 & also include the D3 and soon to arrive D3X & D4. I believe the D60 takes 3 frames per second. I would recommend the 18 - 200 mm lens that Nikon makes, make sure you get a Vibration Reduction lens though (VR). You really will never have to change your lens for the pictures you want to take with that lens either.

The D60 is really user friendly and fun, gives nice pictures and is still light in your hand too!

Ritz sometimes has good deals but as far as the best price generally Amazon or Adorama are good. Make sure you don't buy from a brown market b/c you won't have the manufacturer's warranty.

A good site for information is Ken Rockwell's site which is easy to google.

MHM
Dec. 28, 2008, 03:36 PM
Also clueless about cameras, but....

I just saw an infomercial (!) about a little digital Kodak for $180 that doubles as a video camera. I was thinking it might be good for snapshots and horse videos. Any thoughts?

Freelance
Dec. 28, 2008, 03:38 PM
LBB,

What is your budget?

TC

joiedevie99
Dec. 28, 2008, 03:39 PM
I just got a Panasonic Lumix FZ28. It is a point and shoot with a super-zoom - -which is the best of both worlds to me. It is still automatic (so I don't have to learn settings I don't want to or mess with focusing) but I can zoom up to 18x. I got it at B&H in NY- but they have a great website too.

2hsmommy
Dec. 28, 2008, 03:49 PM
I have the D40, really like it. Easy to use right out of the box.

LaBonnieBon
Dec. 28, 2008, 07:23 PM
LBB,

What is your budget?

TC

As with everything, it's all relative! If it does my laundry, I'll cough up more! LOL! I'm guessing the budget would be up to $1,500. I want a GOOD camera, but I also don't want to have heart failure if anything happens to it. You know... things break, things get stolen.... I certainly don't want to break the bank if something happens to the camera and I have to replace it... ya know??

What is the difference between the lenses that start at 18 and the ones that start at 55 or 75?

LaBonnieBon
Dec. 28, 2008, 07:25 PM
I just got a Panasonic Lumix FZ28. It is a point and shoot with a super-zoom - -which is the best of both worlds to me. It is still automatic (so I don't have to learn settings I don't want to or mess with focusing) but I can zoom up to 18x. I got it at B&H in NY- but they have a great website too.

This is the camera I have now.... I hit a bump with my 4-wheeler and the camera dove into a pile of fresh cow poop. It's never worked quite the same since....

RheinlandPfalzSaar
Dec. 28, 2008, 07:34 PM
What is the difference between the lenses that start at 18 and the ones that start at 55 or 75?

That's just the zoom on the lens. The 18 - 200 mm gives you the most freedom regarding range and it is all and all a very good lens. You are welcome to look at mine, I have this set-up (D60 w/ 18-200 VR) and also a D700 body with a few FX lenses. Really unless you are shooting in low light conditions this should be great for you.

Extreme Chaos
Dec. 28, 2008, 07:36 PM
This is the camera I have now.... I hit a bump with my 4-wheeler and the camera dove into a pile of fresh cow poop. It's never worked quite the same since....


LOL, I wonder why????????????:eek:

bayknight
Dec. 28, 2008, 09:21 PM
Canon user chiming in here....

Have you considered a Canon? The Canon Rebel XSI? It boasts a 12.2 megapixel as well as 3.5fps (frames per second) when shooting in Continuous mode.

I personally own the 30D but my parents own the Canon XSI, and have been very happy with it. They went to Africa this year and took some amazing pictures! I made a 24 x 36 poster for them for Christmas with several of the images on it and the sharpness of the images was incredible! :eek:

I have my eyes set on the 50D which has a 15.1 megapixel, 6.3fps...but I will have to wait till I have some money saved up for that one! So far the reviews on it are great, and the color saturation is supposed to be excellent and a great SLR without have to spend the money on a full frame camera....

I just wanted to add my thoughts coming from the Canon world here... B&H photo is a great place to browse selections on Camera's, they have incredible customer service and they ship either the same day or the next day: http://www.bhphotovideo.com (http://www.bhphotovideo.com)

fourmares
Dec. 28, 2008, 10:45 PM
The Nikon D40 or the D60 are both good cameras for an amature photographer. The Canon Rebel models are good too. An 18 - 200 lense is good, or if you get two lenses, go with 18 - 135 and 70 - 300.

The most significant difference between the SLRs and the point and shoots is that the point and shoots all have shutter lag. Meaning that there is a pause between when you push the button and when the camera takes the picture... this is a huge factor when you are taking pictures of moving things, like horses.

LockeMeadows
Dec. 29, 2008, 03:42 AM
PM PrivateDiamonds. Her husband is our show team photographer and is all into the camera stuff. Here are a few pictures he took this year;

EllenAspen
Dec. 29, 2008, 09:06 AM
I just got the Nikon D90 for Christmas. My husband bought that one because it takes video shots as well (up to 5 minutes). I spent the day taking pictures yesterday trying to learn to use it. It does have an auto feature...but, I am determined to learn the manual use.

I like the video feature b/c I put together slide shows of our shows such as below:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hji03wUcOfs

DMK
Dec. 29, 2008, 09:42 AM
I march to the beat of a different drummer and went with the Pentax K10D (now replaced by the K20). My reasons for choosing the Pentax over a Nikon were mostly because the Pentax is a camera tha tis designed to handle dust and blowing dirt better - has a ton of seals and has a dust removal system to keep the insides of the camera clean. It also has a stabilization device in the camera, which means you don't have to buy stabilization lenses. Last but not least, in several reviews, it was described as a camera that could also come pretty close to behaving like an old SLR as well as a new DSLR. Since the last time I played with an SLR it was in the 80's when I was even developing a bit of film too,I thought that would be a good jumping off point.

As it turned out, I had forgotten damn near everything, so I had to act like a newbie and start with green mode and JPEG. This year's goal? I will conquer layering and RAW development.

The downside with Pentax is there are not a lot of lenses available, either pentax or tamron/other brand. The good news is you don't have to look at the price of a non image stabilization lens and one with image stabilization and whimper, knowing if you want to take action pics, you need image stabilization. That function is built into the Pentax camera body so you already got it.

Here's some pics taken last winter at WEF with a fairly unassuming (and inexpensive) 50-200mm lens. Just be prepared that whatever camera you get, its the lens envy that will wipe out your pocket book. I have dreams... (http://www.adorama.com/PX3004AFD.html)

http://www.flickr.com/photos/24594726@N04/sets/72157604098703783/show/

justathought
Dec. 29, 2008, 09:42 AM
Another Cannon Rebel user - love it!

Bottom line, at the recreational user price point I think that it all comes down to which one you like

Firebug
Dec. 29, 2008, 10:07 AM
I don't know anything about either of the cameras you are looking at, but I would also recommend you take a photography class to help you understand what all the features on your camera do.
Since the camera is only as good has the photographer.

Here's something else to think about maybe you don't need such a high end camera? If all you're looking for is to take farm/show pictures and some videos you might like not so complicated of a camera

I was given a new camera for Christmas. I had no idea I was getting one! I would have loved to get a camera like everyone is taking about. But then I'm really into photography. However those cameras were not in the budget.

I was given a Canon Powershot SX 110 IS which is s compact ultra-zoom 9.0 Megapixel digital camera.
I just got it so I can't say if I love the camera or not. But it seems like a nice camera. My brother in-law has the same camera but last years modal and he loves it. His camera takes lovely pictures.

Here is what the add says about the camera
The powershot sx 110 is equipped with many of the same features as a higher-end cameras: An ultra-powerful zoom, eye-popping resolution and advanced picture-improving technology. This compact camera sports a fast, steady 10x optical zoom that keeps up with your most ambitious shooting: No more standing on the sidelines wishing you could get in closer. 9.0 megapixels of resolution give your photography incomparable depth and ensure that any section of any shot can be enlarged and cropped with no loss in quality.

I'm hoping it's a good camera.

bayknight
Dec. 29, 2008, 11:00 AM
Canon user chiming in here....

Have you considered a Canon? The Canon Rebel XSI? It boasts a 12.2 megapixel as well as 3.5fps (frames per second) when shooting in Continuous mode.

I personally own the 30D but my parents own the Canon XSI, and have been very happy with it. They went to Africa this year and took some amazing pictures! I made a 24 x 36 poster for them for Christmas with several of the images on it and the sharpness of the images was incredible! :eek:

I have my eyes set on the 50D which has a 15.1 megapixel, 6.3fps...but I will have to wait till I have some money saved up for that one! So far the reviews on it are great, and the color saturation is supposed to be excellent and a great SLR without have to spend the money on a full frame camera....

I just wanted to add my thoughts coming from the Canon world here... B&H photo is a great place to browse selections on Camera's, they have incredible customer service and they ship either the same day or the next day: http://www.bhphotovideo.com (http://www.bhphotovideo.com)

forgot to mention that the Canon Rebel XSI also has a Self Cleaning Unit as well that shakes dust particles off the filter that is in front of the sensor, the 30D does not have this feature, while the 40D does. So that being said you are getting a more advanced feature! ;)

**If you want to see the poster I made I will be more than happy to post a link here, you can even click on the link to see the full-size image

Freelance
Dec. 29, 2008, 10:20 PM
Firebug offered some good advice. If you are looking to invest the budgeted figure you gave then it would be prudent to study the basic fundamentals of photography. I’d be wealthy if I had a dime for every person that asks me to set up their camera so it takes good low light action pictures. My response is…”Did you read the manual?” The overwhelming reply 99% of the time is, “No…” Today’s digital cameras are super complex image capturing devices operated by a sophisticated computer but still they operate based upon the basic fundamentals of photography. I’ll assume you are familiar with the principals of photography and are willing to sit and read the entire manual. If so I would recommend the following:
Nikon Auto Focus 80-200 F2.8 D ED INTERNAL FOCUS AF-S (77)
Nikon Digital D2H 4.10 M/P WITH BATTERY & CHARGER (CF CARD ) DIGITAL SLR INTERCHANGEABLE LENS CAMERA
Buy them used from Keh.com in Atlanta. For the budgeted amount you will get the most BANG for the buck. It is a super tough professional rig, it will not break the bank and it is capable of producing stunning photographs…but again it is the Photographer that makes the photograph…not the camera.
TC

downthecenterlinetheycome
Dec. 30, 2008, 12:29 AM
I have the Canon 20d and find it very good, and it has a great burst mode. Unfortunately I'm stuck with really cheap lenses (one fixed 50mm that was $90, one fixed 100mm), but it still performs quite well. It's dirt cheap too compared to others of its caliber, especially if you get it used. Or you could spring for the 40d, but the lenses (as I have learned the hard way) are more important than the camera.

EDIT: The Canon 40d is less than $800 on Amazon right now, which is an amazing deal! It's even less than the current price for the 20d. I would SO spring for it if I had the cash. -sigh-

poltroon
Dec. 30, 2008, 03:03 AM
I have a Canon S3IS. It is not quite in the class of a DSLR, but it has 12x zoom and can take pretty good shots across a large arena. The lag is brief in well-lit situations, less good in low light. It is small and easy to carry on me even while giving my daughter a lesson or otherwise around the farm. It can also do video. It is in the $350 range... though you may have to buy the successor, the S5IS.

If you are not particularly interested in photography, you might find one of these superzoom cameras that are a step below the DSLR will meet your needs quite nicely, that the portability is even an advantage.

DMK, thanks for your review of the Pentax. I lust after a nice DSLR, particularly for bird shots (faster and smaller and less predictable than horses), but I've been spending money on fencing etc instead. I grew up with a simple Pentax K-1000, all manual, and I keep looking at their DSLRs and thinking of how many lenses I already own...

katarine
Dec. 30, 2008, 10:41 AM
If you aren't going to really get into the camera and take advantage of all it can do, then it's just a pricey trinket that's sexy looking. Nothing wrong with that :) LOL! I would seriously take a photog. class to get a feel for what you can do.

For portability, ease of use, and my requirement that I can trail ride with it, I love the Kodak Easyshare cameras. I'm on my second. The first took these shots:
http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47b6d600b3127ccecebeda5b73a600000010O08AZN2TRm4Ytw e3nwA/cC/f%3D0/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/

http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47b6d600b3127ccecebfa885d23d00000010O08AZN2TRm4Ytw e3nwA/cC/f%3D0/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/

http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47b6ce06b3127ccecf22230cd7dd00000010O08AZN2TRm4Ytw e3nwA/cC/f%3D0/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/

http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47b5d909b3127ccecbed2714934500000010O08AZN2TRm4Ytw e3nwA/cC/f%3D0/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/

the newer one took these: (model Z812 IS)

http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47b8d711b3127ccec56984ca9bd900000040O08AZN2TRm4Ytw e3nwA/cC/f%3D0/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/

http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47b8dd06b3127ccec3e225a6631400000010O08AZN2TRm4Ytw e3nwA/cC/f%3D0/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/
and it can do decent videos....

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QxbO6enYtIY --- not bad for a 250 dollar camera.

Kementari
Dec. 30, 2008, 11:06 AM
Since I'm currently going through one of my "seriously lusting after a DSLR" phases (as opposed to the just "really wanting a DSLR" that I do normally :lol: )...how much memory do you all recommend for something like the Nikon D60? I have enough memory to hold about 500 (highest resolution) pics for my point-n-shoot, and I have never used it all (because I am OCD about uploading them to my computer as soon as possible ;)) - but I like having the leeway of not having to worry that I'm going to run out, and I know with a buffer I'd probably take more pics, too...

asanders
Dec. 30, 2008, 01:10 PM
I got a Nikon D40 for xmas last year and I love it. This year I convinced my sister to get one for our dad who just retired. She was also buying for her daughter who does sports and is taking photography in school. After researching, she got the Rebel for her daughter. The one knock on the D40 is that it is not so great for sports photography, and the Rebel is rated best for this.

Either one of these cameras will fit comfortably in your budget. Some of this is reiterative of others but,

Take a class. Make it fun. You can do this at a community college, or places like Ritz camera offer short courses.

Memory cards are super cheap on amazon if you order the ones that say 'bulk package'. Instead of coming in a giant bubble pack, they come in a tiny little box --so you pay less :cool:

I have an 18-55 lens and a 55-200. The first is general purpose, the other gives pretty good zoom. They are very easy to swap. Don't try to make one size fit all. 2 lenses are in your budget

Get a good camera bag. I have an Ape Case made by Norazza (from amazon). It has the wonderful feature of being bright yellow inside, so you can see what the heck you are doing. Also has great functionality. The medium holds The SLR + extra lens, the digital camcorder, the old coolpix, and doubled as my purse at Disney world :winkgrin:. The small (which I got my dad) would hold most of that.

I found a great deal on a tripod at Heartland America (http://www.heartlandamerica.com/browse/search.asp?GUID=698D32E2-1FDB-473E-9CD7-B22D5AB132C4&storefront=1). It is all aluminum, light, comes in a carry case, and is very adjustable. Very useful for shooting horse stuff.

In line with taking a course, get good software. I use Photoshop. There is just no substitute, and bad software will make you want to tear your hair out, or you will just not use it, which gives up one of the biggest benefitrs of having a good digital camera. Photoshop home essentials (I think now called elements) is actually fine (maybe more user friendly to most than full Photoshop), but PhotoDeluxe (also from Adobe, I think for packaging with stuff) is worthless (IMHO). Whatever came with your computer, or comes with the camera is probably likewise. In any case, if you are frustrated by the software, there may be something better, so check around.

Experiment, and have fun!!

poltroon
Dec. 30, 2008, 01:35 PM
Another vote for Photoshop - but be warned, at $600 it is pricey. The real Photoshop is much nicer to use than Elements. On the good side, it's unlikely you'll drop your copy of Photoshop in the mud. :D

Kementari
Dec. 30, 2008, 02:01 PM
Definitely go Photoshop. I have used the full version, but at home I just have Elements, and find it does pretty much everything I (with no aspirations to graphic design ;)) need. It also has some nice shortcut-type things to make common fixes easier (of course, it's been awhile since I used the full version and my Elements is like 2.0, so everything may have changed by now! :lol:).

If you are not the type to learn software intuitively, though, and don't want to spend lots of time messing around with different settings to work out what they do, you will definitely want to take a class. It's a complicated program - incredibly useful and hands-down the best out there, but complicated. :yes:

DMK
Dec. 30, 2008, 03:08 PM
kementari, be aware, not all memory cards are created equal!

Sure, all 4GB cards hold 4 GB (more or less) and that will translate into roughly the same amount of photos depending on whether you shoot JPEG, RAW or JPEG+RAW, but a card AND a camera is only as good as how fast it can record that image to that card.

That being said, there is a reason why you will see a huge price difference in some cards with the same amount of memory. It has to do with the speed of the card. This isn't a huge issue unless your plan is to take continous action shots, then you need to be aware that the card speed (or lack thereof) could slow down your camera.

Hoever let me tell you, finding a high speed card takes no small amount of work on the part of the buyer. It's well hid data thank you very much!

Here's a Wiki explanation:


SD Speed Class Ratings

SDHC cards have SD Speed Class Ratings defined by the SD Association. The SD Speed Class Ratings specify the following minimum write speeds based on "the best fragmented state where no memory unit is occupied":[18] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Secure_Digital_card#cite_note-SDHC_speedclass-17)

Class 2: 2 MB/s
Class 4: 4 MB/s
Class 6: 6 MB/s SDHC cards will often also advertise a maximum speed (such as 133x or 150x) in addition to this minimum Speed Class Rating. See section Speeds (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Secure_Digital_card#Speeds) above for a further explanation. One critical difference between the Speed Class and the maximum speed ratings is the ability of the host device to query the SD card for the speed class and determine the best location to store data that meets the performance required. "Maximum speed" ratings are quoted by the manufacturers but unverified by any independent evaluation process.


which mostly tells you the 133X designation is, in a word, bullshit. You need to know the class of the card to really know how fast it is. I'm using a 4GB SDHC Panasonic card with a 6X rating. IT holds over 800 JPEG shots and does record data fast. But it cost about $80. I can tell a difference between it and a cheap card though!

Sing Mia Song
Dec. 30, 2008, 03:41 PM
I bought a new DSLR in 2006 and narrowed it between Canon and Nikon. Eventually went with the Nikon D70 and am very happy.

Penn camera is local and their staff is extremely knowledgable. They will spend all the time with you that you need and never pressure you to buy a thing. You can handle every camera you want and there is no such thing as a stupid question. They also offer classes--unfortunately, I haven't yet had time to take one, although I really, really want to.

Their prices are higher than what you would pay online (I've found very good prices at Butterfly) but the service can't be beat, and I like to reward the local guys for hiring true photographers instead of some high school kid in a blue polo shirt, aka Best Buy.

Kementari
Dec. 30, 2008, 04:18 PM
kementari, be aware, not all memory cards are created equal!

Sure, all 4GB cards hold 4 GB (more or less) and that will translate into roughly the same amount of photos depending on whether you shoot JPEG, RAW or JPEG+RAW, but a card AND a camera is only as good as how fast it can record that image to that card.

Gack! Even more research to be done!

It's a good thing I won't have the money to embark on this venture for awhile, yet - just when I think I've learnt what I need to know to pick out the right equipment, I find out there's more... :eek:

Thanks for the info, though - I would hate to get a cheap card and not be able to work out why the camera wasn't working as fast as it should!

Nikki^
Dec. 30, 2008, 04:36 PM
I own a Nikon D-80 and I love it! I take photos of the local rock bands here and have learned about shutter speed really quickly.
I want the 18-200 lens too but it's pricy at $1800!!!:eek: I am currently using the lens that the camera came with and I am happy with that. I wuld love to get the one that is used in very low light but it doesn't zoom up well (thankfully the band boys let me get on stage).

Here's some of my work:

I had the camera at 15f/s setting and no flash. You have to wait for the right moments but when you get them they are gorgeous. Club lighting is also very important when using a stock lens.

StrongFold at Grand Central
http://i156.photobucket.com/albums/t13/ntorchia/StrongFold/DSC_0174.jpg
http://i156.photobucket.com/albums/t13/ntorchia/StrongFold/DSC_0232.jpg
http://i156.photobucket.com/albums/t13/ntorchia/StrongFold/DSC_0198.jpg
http://i156.photobucket.com/albums/t13/ntorchia/StrongFold/DSC_0359.jpg
http://i156.photobucket.com/albums/t13/ntorchia/StrongFold/DSC_0338.jpg
http://i156.photobucket.com/albums/t13/ntorchia/StrongFold/DSC_0324.jpg

http://i156.photobucket.com/albums/t13/ntorchia/StrongFold/DSC_0095.jpg

Silver Tongue Devil at Thunders (the lighting isn't that great)


My friend Michael and me. (he's soooooo cute!)
http://i156.photobucket.com/albums/t13/ntorchia/Silver%20Tongue%20Devil/DSC_0163.jpg

Da Band
http://i156.photobucket.com/albums/t13/ntorchia/Silver%20Tongue%20Devil/DSC_0061.jpg
http://i156.photobucket.com/albums/t13/ntorchia/Silver%20Tongue%20Devil/DSC_0144.jpg

Here are some with the flash

My Friend Philip
http://i156.photobucket.com/albums/t13/ntorchia/Silver%20Tongue%20Devil/DSC_0176.jpg

Da band
http://i156.photobucket.com/albums/t13/ntorchia/Silver%20Tongue%20Devil/DSC_0118.jpg

stuge
Dec. 30, 2008, 09:49 PM
As much as I would love the AF-S VR Nikkor 70-200 f/2.8, at $1800, that's not going to be in the budget for a while. I've had the D70 for two years now and have been using my dad's old SLR 35mm lens' and really need to upgrade to something made for the digitial cameras.

What would you recommend? I'd love an 18-200mm lens but would I be sacrificing quality in my horse action shots when zooming in?

secretariat
Dec. 31, 2008, 01:21 PM
If you're a camera nut, ignore this post. If you're a photog dummy like me and just want good action photos, read on.

My criteria:
1. At least 10X (optical) zoom (probably the most important facet for horse shows).
2. Point and shoot
3. 8 MP or so resolution (more isn't necessarily better, as it shrinks your card and clutters up your computer)
4. Autostabilization

Researched the topic and bought Canon SX100 IS. Fabulous camera, gets tossed around everywhere in the car/truck/trailer, a jillion pictures fit on a 2GB card. Lock the focus at a jump & it's foolproof after a few "timing" tests. I'm too stupid to focus, set speeds, etc., so this camera is ideal for me. I always take highest resolution pix and then crop them on Photoshop (the cheap version, not the $600 item). They're good enough to have been published in several national and local "slick" magazines.

What I'd change:
1. It's a little heavy for your pocket, but I couldn't find any of the really little flat ones with an adequate zoom.
2. I'd like even more (optical) zoom, but that would probably just get shaky.

Firebug
Dec. 31, 2008, 04:11 PM
Researched the topic and bought Canon SX100 IS. Fabulous camera, gets tossed around everywhere in the car/truck/trailer, a jillion pictures fit on a 2GB card. Lock the focus at a jump & it's foolproof after a few "timing" tests. I'm too stupid to focus, set speeds, etc., so this camera is ideal for me. I always take highest resolution pix and then crop them on Photoshop (the cheap version, not the $600 item). They're good enough to have been published in several national and local "slick" magazines.


I'm glad you like your camera. I just got the Canon SX110 IS which is the extended form of SX100 IS. The biggest difference between the two is the SX110 IS has more Megapixels and a bigger LCD screen. I'm still reading the manual, so I know how to work all the features!

BelladonnaLily
Dec. 31, 2008, 10:37 PM
I have the Nikon D80 and love it. It has everything on it that I could ever want. It came with a 18-135 lens, and I just got a 70-300 lens for Christmas that I can't wait to use. I was told that the Nikon's were more user-friendly for novices than the Canons, but no personal experience with the Canons. One sister has an older Nikon D40 and loves it.

secretariat
Dec. 31, 2008, 10:56 PM
Firebug -- if you find any neat stuff in the manual, I'd appreciate a note. I never read the manuals; if I can't figure it out, it's too complicated for me. I'm sure I miss a lot that way, but .............

Tom King
Jan. 1, 2009, 09:56 AM
For your $1500 budget here's your camera. There are of course newer models but for the money this combo won't be beaten. Several friends of ours have the same setup that they bought a couple of years ago for 1,00 more and they are still taking great photos.

http://www.adorama.com/INKD200K2.html

or with no experience with this camera maybe:
http://www.adorama.com/INKD90K70.html

or http://www.adorama.com/NK18200DXU.html
with http://www.adorama.com/INKD90A.html which includes card and spare battery.

Ken Rockwell likes it.
http://www.kenrockwell.com/nikon/d90.htm
you can learn all you need to know from Ken Rockwell on his site
http://www.kenrockwell.com/tech/recommended-cameras.htm

You would need to buy card for either of the first two I listed but they are over on the right of the pages. I've bought cameras from Adorama with very quick and good service.

Firebug
Jan. 1, 2009, 11:24 AM
Firebug -- if you find any neat stuff in the manual, I'd appreciate a note. I never read the manuals; if I can't figure it out, it's too complicated for me. I'm sure I miss a lot that way, but .............

Of course. I hate reading manuals too there give me headaches, but I'm trying to read this manual so I don't miss out on any of the features. :)

poltroon
Jan. 1, 2009, 12:49 PM
Here is a picture (http://www.ponydom.com/images/birds/swan_goose_head_0438.jpg) from my S3IS (shrunk down quite a bit).

DMK
Jan. 1, 2009, 10:15 PM
I've bought cameras from Adorama with very quick and good service.

I second third and fourth Adorama!

fourmares
Jan. 2, 2009, 01:03 AM
I looked at Adorama, and Kits Cameras (www.ritzcamera.com) have better deals.

equineartworks
Jan. 2, 2009, 10:14 AM
Getting a huge MP camera is great if you are planning on printing enormous prints and canvases. But if you are looking to get great show pics your lens is going to be your most important purchase. A 70mm-200mm - F/2.8 will serve you well for most anythign horse related. You can expect to pay about $1500 for the lens alone but you won't be sorry. You can get a 70-300mm f4-5.6 for around $500 but it will not have the speed the other lens does.

If it were me, and I do take photographs for a living when the spirit moves me, I would go for the lighter, cheaper body and invest in the lens.

Adorama, B & H and Ritz have good deals, but don't forget about Amazon.com. I have gotten better deals there in recent years than I have at the camera co's.

fourmares
Jan. 2, 2009, 02:50 PM
Has anyone done business with www.DigiCombos.com ? They have a combo (NKD80DC3) for $1,299 that has a D80, three lenses (18-135 and 70 - 300, and a wide angle), a flash, three filters, a USB card reader, a memory card, a lense cleaning kit, two tripods (mini table top and full size), a compact soft bag and a hard case... kind of seems too good to be true.

meaty ogre
Jan. 2, 2009, 04:38 PM
I have a sony alpha 100 dslr. I am a total camera dummy. I went to ritz camera and they hooked me up with camera body, lens and flash and several fun filters for $1000 (2.5 years ago). I have no regrets. It came with a free class that I didn't take. I was able to use it right out of the box. I did eventually google ISOs and white balance, but I did fine before I knew what that stuff was.

I also elements. Not so user-friendly IMHO, but I have been told by photo professor uncle that the real thing would seriously overwhelm me. I can do what I need on it, though I do get frustrated.

Eventually I'm going to add a long-distance lens, but I only have limited use for one so I haven't splurged yet.

stuge
Jan. 4, 2009, 05:22 PM
be sorry. You can get a 70-300mm f4-5.6 for around $500 but it will not have the speed the other lens does.
.

If I was to get this lens for taking horse shots, what would happen. Would it just not be as clear or would they come out blurry?

DMK
Jan. 4, 2009, 08:37 PM
Let me see if I can dig aperture and shutter speed knowledge out of my dusty brain vault. Cheaper (as in less than a $1000) telephoto lens usually have an f stop range of 4.0 to 5.6, some as high as 6+

This presents a problem when you have less than superior lighting conditions.

In order to catch high speed movement the shutter cannot be open for too long - ideally you want a very narrow opening and a very fast open/close action - these terms are called f stop and shutter speed. If light is less than really bright this mean the lens opening (aperture) has to open up a bit wider if you still want the shutter speed to be fast enough to catch the motion. The problem is when you let the camera determine these things by its priority, it will want to open the aperture (f stop) wider - if you have a lens that only has a 4-6 f stop then the shutter speed will have to slow down in order to let enough light in - this means blurry.

This is very elementary - we aren't even getting into pushing the ISO higher to compensate for light aperture limitations or the limitations in depth of field due to f stop limitations but bottom line is most lower end lenses have less range of f stop. They also generally don't have the rapid autofocus. This is useful if you wanted to take pictures of more than one fence per course or if you are trying to get the lens to focus in on a rapidly moving object and stay in focus as the object leaves or approaches the camera (preventing more blur). Last but not least, there is a world of difference in crispness the better the glass used in the lens.

The most annoying problem I have found is that lens run from relatively cheap to very expensive. A good "ammy" lens will cost you $200-300. A really good ammy lens will cost $1000+ (and then pro lenses are muy expensivo). But there is not much (anything) in the telephoto 70-200/300 range that is up to an f 2.8 for less than a $1000. KInd of a discouraging gap for someone who wants to move up in lens quality, but isn't sure this hobby is worth another $1000

msrobin
Jan. 4, 2009, 11:54 PM
I have a Canon EOS XTI and just love it. The photos are always perfect and you can do so much with it. It cost $900 with one lens. I have always used the Nikon F5 film camera until I decided to go digital and this camera rocks. I cannot say enough good things about it.

Here is a link to the camera.
http://www.usa.canon.com/consumer/controller?act=ModelInfoAct&fcategoryid=139&modelid=14256

I just purchased two additional lenses one is 300mm 2.8 and the other a wide angle telephoto which I use for landscape scenes it is awesome.


I also shoot a lot of night photos and this camera allows you to change the settings with ease.


Good luck