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View Full Version : What is the most affordable yet nice looking horse fence??



erinwillow
Dec. 26, 2008, 03:00 PM
We've already got some white vinyl up. . but honestly, I won't be investing in any more of that crap! lol!! :lol: it chips and breaks, cracks. . what a pain! However, anyone have good suggestions for *affordable* yet nice looking horse fencing??

Hunter's Rest
Dec. 26, 2008, 03:26 PM
IMO nothing beats 3 (or 4) board oak fence. Save $ by getting the materials yourself (why pay your fencer guy to pick it up for you); by painting it yourself (sloppy and horrible, but lots of $$avings); by using 7' posts instead of longer (just needs to be below frost line, not wayyy below.) I think it the most handsome, ever, anywhere.

erinwillow
Dec. 26, 2008, 03:39 PM
IMO nothing beats 3 (or 4) board oak fence. Save $ by getting the materials yourself (why pay your fencer guy to pick it up for you); by painting it yourself (sloppy and horrible, but lots of $$avings); by using 7' posts instead of longer (just needs to be below frost line, not wayyy below.) I think it the most handsome, ever, anywhere.

Thanks for responding. . . so, do you find that the lumber is cheaper at a lumber yard or at a home DIY place like Lowe's or Home Depot? Actually, I have totally been dreaming of nice, solid board fencing. .either black or painted white (to match the crapo vinyl :no: *sigh*) I am hoping there might be a lumber sale now while it's still winter and then we can stock up for a Spring project, yay! :winkgrin: Have you purchased wood recently? What are prices running per board, per fence post??

Bluey
Dec. 26, 2008, 04:52 PM
Depending on how much lumber you need, you could look for mills close by and ask how much they charge for a load of the kind of lumber you want.

You may get it delivered from the mill cheaper than you can buy it at the big box stores one board at the time, if you need a larger volume.

How much are you fencing in, feet, yards or miles?

erinwillow
Dec. 26, 2008, 05:02 PM
Hi Bluey,

Well, so far I've got only rough estimates. .the pasture is about 4-5 acres. . .sorry I'm not so precise. .

Bluey
Dec. 26, 2008, 05:21 PM
Those little measuring wheels you can get at Loewes or Home Depot for little, that you can walk along rolling them on the ground, may tell you how many feet you need.

There are also electronic gadgets that read those measurements for you.

An acre on a square, that your land may not be, is 208.7 on each side, so say that you may have 9 208.7' long sides to your parcel of land on a wavey pattern, rounded up to at most maybe 10 sides, so you may need up to 2087' of material, times how many boards you want to use, three or four, plus post every so many feet, gates, corner posts and braces.

I would get bids from local companies.:p
Those companies can buy the material in bulk cheaper than you can and so, adding their labor and a profit, still come in the same or even cheaper than you can buy the material retail.

You can then always say thanks, you will think about it, if the bids come above your budget.:yes:

Altamont Sport Horses
Dec. 26, 2008, 05:40 PM
Since you already have the white vinyl fencing have you thought about the flexible poly rails like Ramm and Centaur sell? It would probably go well with the vinyl you already have. We put up Centaur with a 5.25" wide white hot rail on top for visibility since we have a couple of night blind appaloosas here. And below that we have the polycoated wire by Centaur. We alternated between polycoated wire and the polycoated hotwire. Works great and it can take a beating. I've seen my guys run into it full blast when they were playing and not paying attention - they bounce right off of it. We had a large hardwood tree fall on it during a storm and it didn't break or even come down, just wrinkled in that spot. You could certainly do all the wide rails as well. I had it professionally installed and it looks great IMO. The stallions have the same fencing except it is on even taller posts with an extra strand of polycoated wire. 20 year warranty.

Go all the way to the bottom of this page to get a good look at it. http://www.altamontsporthorses.com/wapsadaisy.html

VarsityHero4
Dec. 26, 2008, 05:48 PM
Are you talking about the solid white vinyl/pvc type stuff or the stuff that's like fence "tape"? I worked on a LARGE breeding farm that had fence like this: http://www.centaurhtp.com/cenflex-gallery.html

It seemed very durable for the fact that we constantly climbed through it, bending the strips, and there were quite a few youngsters going into it, through it, over it, you name it. In the year that I worked there I never saw one break, even when the blind horse broke through an entire post! lol I think it looks pretty good too, almost like the solid stuff.

Daydream Believer
Dec. 26, 2008, 06:00 PM
Horseguard. I love the stuff. It has some drawbacks but for the money and the safety and it attractiveness, you can't beat it.

Altamont Sport Horses
Dec. 26, 2008, 06:06 PM
Nobody climbs *through* our fence. First of all, it is tight and the rails are close together (maybe 8"-9" apart). Secondly, the fence is hot. The top rail is a nice wide one but it has a hot strip attached to it. It is called Hot Rail. http://www.centaurhtp.com/hot-rail.html This keeps them from hanging over the fence or trying to climb it. And then starting at the bottom we have alternated polycoated wire from Centaur http://www.centaurhtp.com/polyplus.html with electrified polycoated wire from Centaur called White Lightning. It looks the same but has black strips running through it which conduct electricity. I've not had a horse successfully go over, under or through. Knock on wood of course. ;)

NoDQhere
Dec. 26, 2008, 07:06 PM
I'll second the Horse Guard Fence. We have miles of it. It is economical, easy to install and the horses R-E-S-P-E-C-T it. It looks very good on wood posts and is easy to maintain.

poltroon
Dec. 26, 2008, 08:34 PM
I quite like the flex-fence from Centaur or Ramm. It's sturdy, has a traditional look, and low maintenance once installed properly. I use mine with no-climb, and it's holding up brilliantly.

HorseGuard is good fence, but it's not nearly as attractive, and it does rely on the electrical charge to truly contain the horses.

MistyBlue
Dec. 26, 2008, 09:07 PM
Agree with poltroon...I have the Ramm fence...combo top rail Flex fence, 4 strands 5/16th coated wire and one line electric braid. Attractive, visible, sturdy as heck, little to no maintenance. Once in a while I have to go out and ratchet up the tensioners again for a tiny bit of sag which takes all of 5 minutes. Centaur also makes about the same stuff and also has an excellent reputation.
I was sold completely on mine when my late mare did a combo spook/REALLY pissed off charge straight at the fence. She's never been a fence jumper but was a world class fence smasher...she'd charge right through oak board as if it were kindling. You could see her power up and throw her chest into it to make sure she'd smash it up on the way through. She went full bore at the Ramm fence at charging speed...hit it, bowed it out a couple feet and it snapped back and tossed her backwards onto her oversized cheesed off arse. Not a mark on her, not a mark on the fence. Have to admit I did NOT think it would stand up to that...she weighed 1640 lbs! Darned impressed with it since. Now I'm not sure if the fence posts helped...I have 6" round line posts and 8" round end/corner/gate posts. Pretty much small telephone poles, LOL!
I don't know if Centaur does the same, but if you go to Ramm's website you can fill out a form for a free brochure sent to your house. It's a decent sized thing, like a newspaper wiith sections. It not only has the prices for everything it also has a few worksheet pages that help you easily figure out exactly what you need, how much of each and how much the entire cost will come to including shipping. Their telephone customer service is also excellent, you can call them and tell them your acreage amount and what fencing you like and they'll calculate it for you...or help you choose the safest and cheapest for your budget. heck, they even stay on the phone with you for 2 straight hours talking you through the installation step by step on a Saturday afternoon. :D

JB
Dec. 26, 2008, 10:46 PM
Horseguard electric tape. Love it.

CarolinaGirl
Dec. 26, 2008, 10:58 PM
The last barn I was at had coated high tensile wire. The second wire down was hot so they didn't lean on it or anything. Had one horse literally crash through it... managed to unearth a post (didn't break it). Reset the post, re-tightened the wire and all was back to normal. They also had one section of board fencing on either side of the gates. But since you're looking for something that LOOKS like board fencing I agree with the others and would choose Centaur and Ramm type fencing.

Old Equine Lady
Dec. 26, 2008, 10:58 PM
I have Centaur fencing that is over 25 years old. It still works great, except in certain places where the pony sticks her head though to get the grass when she in confined to the "dry" paddock. Those areas have strenched out on the bottom wire, while the top two are still tight. Have not figured out how to pull the wire though the vinyl to tighten it again. On the north side we have some mildew that won't wash off anymore, even with bleach. Do you think I could paint it after all these years?

county
Dec. 26, 2008, 11:01 PM
I've put up High Tensile around 140 acres the past two years and love it!!! Looks great, easy to maintain, horses and cattle both respect it, easy to keep hot, and easy to work with. I used all wooden posts and drove them in much more solid then digging and so much faster.

MistyBlue
Dec. 26, 2008, 11:09 PM
Old Equine Lady...try washing the mildew with CLR...it's made specifically for molds, rust, lime, calcium...crap like that.
You can buy a spray can of paint made for plastics...almost all hardware stores carry those in the paint sections. The cans have photos of those cheapo plastic lawn chairs being painted funky colors on it. That should work on Centaur or Ramm type fence I would think.

manyspots
Dec. 27, 2008, 06:18 AM
LOVE HORSEGUARD! I did my sacrafice paddock with the Horseguard bi-polar tape. We installed it at the end of November, using t-posts (with their covers) and some pressure treated posts for corners and tensioning points. Went up fast and has so far survived two feet of snow and two trees falling on it during the ice storm. The first time the snow slid off the barn roof, both geldings went CHARGING towards the fence and then stopped short, wheeling back. One of them has never been in electric and both very much respect it. Three stands, highest set at 60". As a previous poster said it does have some drawbacks, but best bang for the buck. Plus I like the idea od 600 lb. breaking point... too many nightmare stories out there about electrobraid, etc. not breaking when a horse gets tangled.

Sparky Boy
Dec. 27, 2008, 08:24 AM
I'll second the Horse Guard Fence. We have miles of it. It is economical, easy to install and the horses R-E-S-P-E-C-T it. It looks very good on wood posts and is easy to maintain.


Not to change the subject, but what kind of charger are you using with your horse guard fence?

Miss-O
Dec. 27, 2008, 09:51 AM
I also LOVE my horseguard fencing! Not quite as nice looking as wood or vinyl but much much cheaper, it's hot so the horses won't lean on it, it's VERY easy to maintain, very easy to install, is fairly safe, and IMHO still looks quite attractive.

shea'smom
Dec. 27, 2008, 09:55 AM
Altamont, I looked for the fence on your site but all I could see were spots!!
Very cute, too.

jacksorbetter
Dec. 27, 2008, 10:15 AM
4 strands of Horseguard fencing. Cheap and easy...did it with my husband over two days:


http://s298.photobucket.com/albums/mm258/ferry2424/?action=view&current=DSC01030.jpg

manyspots
Dec. 27, 2008, 10:25 AM
I used a low impedence Zareba charger for my Horseguard. From what I understand, you can use any charger as long as it is low impedence... I guess this is what is appropriate for tape fences. And it is HOT!!!!!!

I LOVE the t-post covers... attractive and so easy to use.

jn4jenny
Dec. 27, 2008, 01:48 PM
Not much to add, but I board at a barn with the CenTex fencing and it is great! I will definitely consider it if I ever have a farm of my own.

kj2H1D
Dec. 27, 2008, 01:58 PM
How does the Horseguard hold up if you have lots of deer in the area? I'm new to having an acreage and trying to increase my pasture area since the one pasture I have was quite overgrazed from the previos horses .... the temporary electric fencing tape I used last summer to set up a new pasture area worked fine for the horses but the deer seemed to be good at running through it on a regular basis :(

erinwillow
Dec. 27, 2008, 02:09 PM
Since you already have the white vinyl fencing have you thought about the flexible poly rails like Ramm and Centaur sell? It would probably go well with the vinyl you already have. We put up Centaur with a 5.25" wide white hot rail on top for visibility since we have a couple of night blind appaloosas here. And below that we have the polycoated wire by Centaur. We alternated between polycoated wire and the polycoated hotwire. Works great and it can take a beating. I've seen my guys run into it full blast when they were playing and not paying attention - they bounce right off of it. We had a large hardwood tree fall on it during a storm and it didn't break or even come down, just wrinkled in that spot. You could certainly do all the wide rails as well. I had it professionally installed and it looks great IMO. The stallions have the same fencing except it is on even taller posts with an extra strand of polycoated wire. 20 year warranty.

Go all the way to the bottom of this page to get a good look at it. http://www.altamontsporthorses.com/wapsadaisy.html


Altamont,

thank you so much for the link! I was trying to envision what Centaur might look like (horns?? fur?? :lol:) So it's that fence that is like a flexible white strip, right?? I will try to find them online for prices. . .also, did I mention that your Wap filly is just DARLING!! LOVE the spots :D

erinwillow
Dec. 27, 2008, 02:12 PM
4 strands of Horseguard fencing. Cheap and easy...did it with my husband over two days:


http://s298.photobucket.com/albums/mm258/ferry2424/?action=view&current=DSC01030.jpg

Wow! That fencing looks really tidy. . is that just electrical tape, 2" or is it larger?? How much per roll and how many feet per roll?? Good job! (Do they sell the tape in whit--got to have that matching thing going on here or I'll freak out!!! :D) thanks for sharing...lovely farm adn the fence looks great!

erinwillow
Dec. 27, 2008, 02:14 PM
Any links to the Horseguard or Ramm?? fencing?? You guys have such great reviews I'm wanting to research them more ;)

BasqueMom
Dec. 27, 2008, 02:15 PM
I'm a Centaur fan (wonder why?) and on our old place in Colorado we put up six strands
(which was overkill-five is plenty) on wood posts. Three horses (including two OTTBs) on 4.5 acres and we were away from home half the time due to our jobs. Six years and no fence injuries or fretting about the horses while on the road. Lusted after the 5 inch rail but couldn't afford it at the time.

Here in Texas, we have a mismash of Centaur, Polysite (1 inch rail) and PolyPlus (the
coated wire). The Centaur is on wood posts, the Polysite and PolyPlus is on existing
pipe in some areas and on t-posts with T-Sleeve covers in another area with pipe bracing
in the corners.

The PolyPlus in Colorado had a 60-foot tall pine tree fall on it and the top wires sagged
downward. DH cut the tree off the fence and the top wires came back up--all he had to
do was take the tool and tweak the tension on the wires. It also stood up to 3-4 inch
blizzards with drifting. In fact, Centaur makes a 5-inch rail called SnowRail for snow fencing
(it has cable instead of high-tensile wire embedded in the rails) and the rails are put much
closer together. There is miles of it near the Denver airport and along the tollway there.

Any of the products (Centaur or Ramm) that incorporate high-tensile wire have to have the
corners and end/gate posts installed according to the instructions--absolutely not an area to try and cut corners.

Love Altamont's combination of HotRail and the single-strand or coated wire products underneath. Next time or next place, will do combo of a top rail and the coated wire
underneath. If I win the lottery, then perhaps 4-rails of the 5-inch rail.

poltroon
Dec. 27, 2008, 02:29 PM
Horseguard: http://www.horseguardfence.com/

Ramm: http://www.rammfence.com/

erinwillow
Dec. 27, 2008, 02:35 PM
Horseguard: http://www.horseguardfence.com/

Ramm: http://www.rammfence.com/

:winkgrin: thanks poltroon!

Question: With this kind of electrical tape. .what is the best way to splice the ends of meeting strands so that you don't LOOSE THE CURRENT!!!??!! (is that a new thread :confused: sorry. . . but I've had trouble with that in the past. . .)

poltroon
Dec. 27, 2008, 02:38 PM
Horseguard comes with a simple splicing buckle that joins the two ends. No muss, no fuss.
(Splicer buckle picture about halfway down this page: http://www.horseguardfence.com/newcatal/catal.php)

The Horseguard temporary fence kit with the fiberglass posts is only about $250 and a great way to experiment with it. You have enough fence to do something interesting, it is easy to put in and to move, and great for short-term grazing. It would also be good for dividing a pasture in half for rotation.

For those of you who really like electric fencing, I think Centaur's product that has a hot wire integrated into the flex fence is very cool. However, by putting my top rail at 5', I don't have any problem with the horses leaning on the flex fence. When they try to chew it, it bounces out of their mouths.

Daydream Believer
Dec. 27, 2008, 03:11 PM
How does the Horseguard hold up if you have lots of deer in the area? I'm new to having an acreage and trying to increase my pasture area since the one pasture I have was quite overgrazed from the previos horses .... the temporary electric fencing tape I used last summer to set up a new pasture area worked fine for the horses but the deer seemed to be good at running through it on a regular basis :(

I have four strands also and lots and lots of deer and bears and I have had no issues. At first I think they tried it and got shocked. Now the local critters leave it alone and stay out of my pastures. That vinyl stuff won't phase them at all. I had some of that spinoff Centaur stuff and deer dove right through it. The Horseguard was respected though.

I once had a deer get into my horseguard fenced front field at my old farm in NC. The back was in the flexible vinyl rail and that was how he got in and then wandered into the front. We surprised him and he could not figure out how to get back the way he came. He ran up and down the Horseguard line and would not jump it or pop through it. We had to move around and herd the deer to the back of the property and he dove through that vinyl fence immediately.

Here at our new farm in VA, it is all Horseguard and I never see unwanted animals in my pastures.

kj2H1D
Dec. 27, 2008, 03:19 PM
Here at our new farm in VA, it is all Horseguard and I never see unwanted animals in my pastures.

OK, I think I'm sold! This sounds perfect!

Miss-O
Dec. 27, 2008, 03:56 PM
How does the Horseguard hold up if you have lots of deer in the area? I'm new to having an acreage and trying to increase my pasture area since the one pasture I have was quite overgrazed from the previos horses .... the temporary electric fencing tape I used last summer to set up a new pasture area worked fine for the horses but the deer seemed to be good at running through it on a regular basis :(


I'm probably going to jinx myself by admitting this but I've had no problems either. There is ALOT of deer in my area. My pasture was recently built and the deer used that area for feeding and had trails going through it. We've had no problems to date.

poltroon
Dec. 27, 2008, 03:56 PM
Deer go through my Horseguard all the time, but I think that's because in summer we don't always have a good ground - the land can get too dry. I'm going to try the bipolar fence next.

That wouldn't be a problem for y'all in the southeast.

Also, my deer can jump. :D

equineartworks
Dec. 27, 2008, 03:58 PM
We have ElectroBraid but I am loving the look of the horseguard for our back pasture! Woo hoo! Love the brown!

NoDQhere
Dec. 27, 2008, 04:41 PM
We have a lot of deer and they are pretty good at jumping the Horse Guard. The small ones duck through, quickly :lol:. We also have a lot of snow this winter which will stretch the tape, but it is so easy to re-tighten. Our Horse Guard has held up very well to snow, wind, deer and tractor (oops :eek:). We have not had a single fence injury since we put it up. One of the biggest pluses, IMO about Horse Guard is that you can put it on much smaller diameter wood posts or steel (T) posts. That will save hundreds of dollars in fencing costs. We have most of ours on 3" by 6'6" posts. Where we have used steel posts we have put caps on them or covered them with the sleeves.

Even if I hit the lottery and could have any fence I wanted, I think we would still stick with Horse Guard.

manyspots
Dec. 27, 2008, 04:48 PM
I have the bipolar Horseguard only. Decided to go with it because my property had quite a bit of ledge and it is New England :). The bipolar has the positive and ground built into the tape so the horse "theoretically" has to touch its body to the entire surface of the tape. Not sure if that really has to happen because I watched both my guys get hit on their muzzles and backup like they had been attacked. My friend has a shetland who also respects the Bipolar and ONLY the bipolar. Go figure....

Someone asked about splicing... this system using a splicer box which also acts as a tensioner. LOVE THEM! A little tricky to get used to but fantastic!!!! I can actually splice my second paddock into my sacrafice paddock through these boxes.

deltawave
Dec. 27, 2008, 04:49 PM
Love my Electrobraid. I've got 3 paddocks: one 1/2 acre, one 2 acres, one about 4 acres. Four gates, 2 chargers, automatic shutoff and alarm if it's grounded out, all the bells and whistles. Cost? Less than $5K *total* for all 3 paddocks. Upkeep? Tighten the rope once a year (takes about 2 hours), check the voltage weekly. 8000 volts, horses don't go near it, and I have a $5000 warranty against any horse ever getting hurt on the fence.

Love, love, love the stuff.

Serigraph
Dec. 27, 2008, 06:46 PM
I've got horseguard too. It looks very nice. I used wood posts with the brown tape. I've never had a deer in my pastures, although we've only been here less than a year. My horses totally respect it, many times I don't even have it turned on.

Sparky Boy
Dec. 27, 2008, 07:10 PM
We have 3 board for the perimeter fencing but the electric tape sub-dividing the paddocks. I like it a lot but I've had problems with the electric, I think it's the charger. I'm going to get rid of the solar one and get a stronger plug-in one. I'm hoping that will help.

I'd recommend the dark colored tape, black or brown. It looks much better. If you use white and it's not perfectly straight and tight, doesn't look so good.

I've seen deer jump over ours, but only once when it was first put up. My mare chased them out! Since then, I haven't seen the deer even come in our fields.

jacksorbetter
Dec. 28, 2008, 08:37 AM
Wow! That fencing looks really tidy. . is that just electrical tape, 2" or is it larger?? How much per roll and how many feet per roll?? Good job! (Do they sell the tape in whit--got to have that matching thing going on here or I'll freak out!!! ) thanks for sharing...lovely farm adn the fence looks great!

Thanks! I can't remember if its 2 in. its the standard Horseguard tape...they only make one size, and it comes in white, green and brown. I can't remember the exact cost per roll but it was def. the cheapest of all of my options. www.horseguard.com will answer all your questions. I got my posts at home depot for very cheap.

Nipntuck
Dec. 28, 2008, 09:33 AM
Our older fencing is 3 board. The newest pasture (6 years old) is rubber. I am now replacing the oldest boards with rubber. The rubber is very safe, inexpensive, virtually no maintenance, and relatively quick and easy to put up. You do have to do the the corner posts in cement since it is under tension. No electricity to worry about grounding out or getting run through by evil ponies. No boards for the beavers to enjoy. Don't kill so many old oak trees.

erinwillow
Dec. 28, 2008, 09:48 AM
Okay. . can someone please tell me about GATES with Horseguard??? We've tried the electrial tape/plastic springy handle type gate and had a really difficult time with them. . not to mention they BREAK quite easily. Please share pics of your useful and imaginative solutions :winkgrin:

sixpoundfarm
Dec. 28, 2008, 09:51 AM
I like the Horsegard, I have 3 strands up with Tposts as the line posts, and wood ends. The horses respect it, its easy to see, and attractive. I have the Brown tape, and really like how it blends into the landscape. I had white tape and post covers up, and anytime the wind would catch the tape and move it, it drove me crazy to see it! (Granted it was the skinny tape from TSC- garbage!)

Only other HG problem has been mowing. My SO has gotten too close to the tape with the HOT mower,while the wire is fine, the rest of it does melt. LOLOLOL.

I have only had babies go thru it, the section was not electrified at the time, or the foal was just too young to know better. Babies... I'm not so sure I love it until they get the concept of containment, but for the adults its great.

My mudlot and perimeter fence is No climb with rough sawn Oak on top, with a single strand of hotwire around the top board. The lower pastures I am going to do the top rain with the Centaur/Ramm product.

http://i56.photobucket.com/albums/g175/sixpoundfarm/sale%20mares/maybesnow.jpg

And the Horsegard I have used to divide said paddock, but do have one turn out paddock with it, and the T posts. I really prefer how they look with the Post covers. ($$$$$$)
http://i56.photobucket.com/albums/g175/sixpoundfarm/sale%20mares/PC019850copySmall.jpg

sixpoundfarm
Dec. 28, 2008, 09:54 AM
Okay. . can someone please tell me about GATES with Horseguard??? We've tried the electrial tape/plastic springy handle type gate and had a really difficult time with them. . not to mention they BREAK quite easily. Please share pics of your useful and imaginative solutions :winkgrin:

I have a few tape gates, for not so travelled areas. For the heavy traffic I prefer the heavy pipe gats, with the easy to open latches. HATE chains.
I also run a wire/ tape strand over the tops of most gates.

poltroon
Dec. 28, 2008, 11:23 AM
Okay. . can someone please tell me about GATES with Horseguard??? We've tried the electrial tape/plastic springy handle type gate and had a really difficult time with them. . not to mention they BREAK quite easily. Please share pics of your useful and imaginative solutions :winkgrin:

Horseguard suggests running a connecting wire underground and then using an ordinary metal or wood gate (http://www.horseguardfence.com/shop_intus/cat39.php). This is what I plan to do for my permanent installation, because I hate trying to take horses through electric gates. I can't imagine doing it with a 4- or 5- strand gate.

Of course, they also have the spring-loaded handle type, for cases where you don't want to install a conventional gate or where you want electricity going across the gate.

I am impressed with how well thought out and designed Horseguard is. And I'm always surprised that for a bunch of molded plastic parts that it's not made in China, but in France.

erinwillow
Dec. 28, 2008, 02:44 PM
I like the Horsegard, I have 3 strands up with Tposts as the line posts, and wood ends. The horses respect it, its easy to see, and attractive. I have the Brown tape, and really like how it blends into the landscape. I had white tape and post covers up, and anytime the wind would catch the tape and move it, it drove me crazy to see it! (Granted it was the skinny tape from TSC- garbage!)

Only other HG problem has been mowing. My SO has gotten too close to the tape with the HOT mower,while the wire is fine, the rest of it does melt. LOLOLOL.

I have only had babies go thru it, the section was not electrified at the time, or the foal was just too young to know better. Babies... I'm not so sure I love it until they get the concept of containment, but for the adults its great.

My mudlot and perimeter fence is No climb with rough sawn Oak on top, with a single strand of hotwire around the top board. The lower pastures I am going to do the top rain with the Centaur/Ramm product.

http://i56.photobucket.com/albums/g175/sixpoundfarm/sale%20mares/maybesnow.jpg

And the Horsegard I have used to divide said paddock, but do have one turn out paddock with it, and the T posts. I really prefer how they look with the Post covers. ($$$$$$)
http://i56.photobucket.com/albums/g175/sixpoundfarm/sale%20mares/PC019850copySmall.jpg

Apologies for not noticing this earlier. .. but what you mentioned about babies is *so* very correct. In fact, I think the biggest drawback (aside from all the many pluses) to this kind of fencing is the fact that the foals are ALWAYS getting through it!! We might have to do some combination of paddocks where we have the mare/foal pasutre (or stallion pasture) with the three boards and then the horseguard type for all the other guys. . . also, no one has mentioned any hassels with the horseguard. . are there any negatives?? i.e. does it sag?

poltroon
Dec. 28, 2008, 07:45 PM
The horseguard is easy to retighten; I think as long as your posts are secure, it won't sag and if it does, it's easy to fix.

My negatives are:
- The look doesn't thrill me. I don't like the narrow rails.
- I dislike electric in general.
- I have a pony who will notice the instant I leave the fence off, and she has gone through it. However, in both cases it was a section of temporary fence, which is two strands and fiberglass posts. The good news is that there was no injury to the pony, and the fence was perfectly reusable, just has a wrinkled section where it got mashed, and a splicer buckle where it broke, and good to go.

The positives are:
- can't beat the price
- can be installed on pretty much any kind of post you can imagine.
- Very safe other than the escape potential.
- The look doesn't thrill me, but it's not bad looking, especially if done with nice posts. I would suggest green or brown rather than white.
- very easy for one person to put up (other than the post issue, depending on what you choose.
- With T-posts, it can be moved fairly easily. I have a pasture to fence that overlooks a river, and I'm worried about the bluff moving, so putting in permanent, high tension fence does not seem a smart choice there: definitely a job for HorseGuard.
- Components are cleverly designed and work well.

For the babies, I'd consider just adding an extra strand.

manyspots
Dec. 28, 2008, 07:52 PM
I agree it is easy to tighten. Mine has loosened up but between a NASTY ice storm and two major snow storms it has held up well. I am going to tighten mine tomorrow and I am assuming I might have to do it again occassionally over the winter. BUT this is the worst season for us... spring summer and fall should be a breeze.

I paid under $600 for the "Paddock" kit w/ t-post cover kits. About $100 in T posts and pressure treated posts for corners. Seriously can't beat the price.

JB
Dec. 28, 2008, 08:49 PM
Absolutely easy to tighten! I actually love the look of the skinny "rails". I like that it's not as "in your face" as a regular wooden fence, though I do love a nicely done wood fence.

poltroon
Dec. 28, 2008, 08:57 PM
On the escape potential, the other three horses respect it totally and I have no worries about them in this fence. The troublemaker pony has also escaped from pipe corral by breaking the snaps on the gates. ;-p I love her anyway.

erinwillow
Dec. 29, 2008, 08:50 AM
poltroon,

:lol: I *so* know what you are talking about. . .with ponies we're talking about a "horse of another color" alltogether! I swear they could get out of straightjackets!!:lol: And we do have many babies on our farm at any given moment. . . .I think I'll have to use the Horseguard on the Mare-in_Foal pasture and spend all my money on boards to fence in the babies! :eek:

Miss-O
Dec. 29, 2008, 09:19 AM
Okay. . can someone please tell me about GATES with Horseguard??? We've tried the electrial tape/plastic springy handle type gate and had a really difficult time with them. . not to mention they BREAK quite easily. Please share pics of your useful and imaginative solutions :winkgrin:

Actually my gate is my favorite part of my horseguard fence. While those spring handle electric gates can work fine for temporary gates or gates which don't get frequent use they are incredibly impractical for full time regular use.

Gateways are where people and/or horses can get hurt. When your planning your gate you need to keep safety in mind. One of the most important aspects of a gate in regards to safety is to make sure it's quick and easy to open. So IMO those spring handle electric gates are just asking for someone to get hurt.

Depending on the design of your paddock you probably won't need a hot wire above or below your gate to keep it hot on either side of the gate. My pasture is shaped like a rectangle. My charger is on the back of the rectangle my gate is directly across from it. The charger sends electricity down both sides of my pasture so that it stops at the gate on either side works perfectly fine without the underground wire.

Also since the fence is under tension it is especially important to have your ending posts on either side of the gate anchored in concrete. Not only will this save you from having your gate starting to hang unlevel but it will also help keep your end posts in place.

I even designed a pass through for my gate. It's the best thing EVER! It's an opening in the fence between the end post that my horseguard ends at and the post that hangs my gate. I'm pretty small so didn't need a huge gap. I made it big enough so that I can easily slip through the space when I walk through sideways. If I need to run into the pasture for something quick I can do so without messing around with the gate or anything else. This comes especially in handy when I'm trying to carry things through. I no longer have to put stuff down to mess with a gate latch. The only time I wouldn't do this is for a pasture holding foals or mini's. I wouldn't want them being enticed to try and get out that way. But my Morgan and Shetland have no problem with it and respect it. Of course I didn't allow for the added bulk of winter coats or my pregnant belly so I'm forced to use the gate now:lol:

meaty ogre
Dec. 29, 2008, 09:51 AM
I have mostly vinyl fence with a hot wire top and bottom. I didn't want it because I was sure the horses would slice a tendon or get tangled trying to graze through the bottom of the fenceline, but so far it has been a wise investment. It deters them from trying to graze through the fenceline, and keeps small critters out.

For my quarantine paddock that I needed to throw up quickly for the rescue horses I did wood 4x4 posts, 3 strands of generic electrobraid and one strand of 1.5" electric tape at about 5' high. We have an overabundance of deer in this area, and are surrounded by corn and bean fields which draw them. I think the key to deer deterent is a high wire/tape as they are quite the leapers. I also did the one strand high because I was fostering a stallion (who was soon gelded) so I wanted to be safe. I've never had deer go through or over the vinyl, so I think a good solid fence can deter them as well, though I have friends with oak or electric fencing who have big deer problems. I guess it depends how kamikaze they are.

Since my vinyl had a hot wire already installed I spliced the new electric fence into that (the charger was plenty big enough to handle it). Otherwise I would not have been able to do it myself. Borrowed my uncle's auger/tractor to dig the holes and put the posts in. The braided rope electric fence is uber cheap, but I don't like the lower visibility, so I did a strand of electric tape, also very cheap, to take care of that.

poltroon
Dec. 30, 2008, 02:41 AM
poltroon,

:lol: I *so* know what you are talking about. . .with ponies we're talking about a "horse of another color" alltogether! I swear they could get out of straightjackets!!:lol: And we do have many babies on our farm at any given moment. . . .I think I'll have to use the Horseguard on the Mare-in_Foal pasture and spend all my money on boards to fence in the babies! :eek:

Heh. Mine's a Connemara too. She's just like my daughter: obnoxiously smart, always looking for an angle. She doesn't go anywhere. She's just problem-solving, because it amuses her. I will always find her standing, or eating, just outside the gate, with an I-told-you-so grin on her face.

This is the same pony who walked up to a scary green tarp that was scaring all the other horses (who are all older than she) and wondered if she could eat it, or if not, what else it might be good for. :D

Sing Mia Song
Dec. 30, 2008, 03:29 PM
I have a 6-acre pasture in Horseguard and actually prefer it to my five-board paddock. I have a beaver horse, and he will chew on the board fence, but he thoroughly respects the Horseguard.

About deer: I have the green Horseguard, and I've had deer run into it and stretch the tape or knock the insulators off the top (this was a fence that needed to go up on a budget and in a hurry, so it's on T-posts). They've never broken the tape, though, and I just tighten the tape and replace the insulators.

Gates: I have pipe gates set on 6x6 posts. You do not need to complete the circle with Horseguard for it to work, so you can start it at one side of the gate, go around the perimeter, and end at the other gate post. My horses have access to their stalls from the pasture, and there isn't any standing at the gate, so I haven't had a problem with the gate not having a hot wire. I do use the electric gate handles as temporary gates in a pinch, but wouldn't use them long-term.

Chargers: I use a Zareba charger, but I found the solar ones did not work well for me--even the "five mile," which greatly exceeds the amount of fence I have. Got a one-mile plug in and that baby ROCKS!

My only beef with the Horseguard is the insulators. I replace a lot of the pins. I think it's from deer, because they are on the outside of the fenceline, but I'm not sure. Still, for the money, it is a great and secure fence.