PDA

View Full Version : True Christmas Joy!



EqTrainer
Dec. 22, 2008, 01:33 PM
I just called the quarry and they are deliving me 20 tons of pea gravel in a few minutes. This is true Xmas joy for me, as I hate mud... therefore I love pea gravel.

Anyone else gifting themselves gravel this year?

Jleegriffith
Dec. 22, 2008, 02:01 PM
We used lots of asphalt millings which are actually very small and cheap! Created sacrifice areas on either side of the barn and also had the driveway and all paths around the barn done in the millings. There is still mud but a lot less of it!

equineartworks
Dec. 22, 2008, 02:03 PM
Isn't it funny how your ideas for true bliss change with farm ownership?

I know I find myself longing for gravel, fence posts, lumber...

Enjoy your treasure! :D

2DogsFarm
Dec. 22, 2008, 03:09 PM
WooHoo!!!
EqT: what are you using for underlayment beneath your pea gravel?
If you don't use anything your wondrous pea-gravel will gradually disappear into the earth.
I know this because the crusher-run gravel (probably 10X larger than pea gravel) I used at the gates to my pastures is MIA after 4 years of horses walking back & forth over it.

OTOH: the fines (crushed gravel the consistency of very coarse sand) I put down behind the stalls 2 years ago is in fine shape. I had crusher-run laid beneath the fines.

And LOL! - yup, I tend to get much more excited about a pile of surplus fines than any former City Girl should

pintopiaffe
Dec. 22, 2008, 03:12 PM
I am very, very jealous.

VERY jealous.

Merry Christmas. ;)

EqTrainer
Dec. 22, 2008, 03:18 PM
2dogs - I actually have a few layers of crush and larger stone packed down where I am going to put this pea gravel. Otherwise I scrape away the top soil and put it down on top of what is basically sandstone in most places. My horses are barefoot and since I do barefoot rehab, I like all my surfaces to be pea gravel and not larger gravel. It's funny because the farmers always lecture me about this and I just smile :) I want what I want...

So it is here! A huge mountain of pea gravel! And.. drum roll please... my dad said he would buy me another one for Xmas if it would make me this happy so I'm getting another mountain later in the week! Hoorah for pea gravel :D

PP - I wish I could send you some, I would!

atr
Dec. 22, 2008, 04:55 PM
Mud?

Won't have to wory about that until May...

It's a white and tidy out there now.

True Christmas Joy would be one of my neighbors running their snow plow up my driveway and saving me a chore :)

JSwan
Dec. 22, 2008, 08:25 PM
I am very very very very very very jealous!!!

I hate mud.

meaty ogre
Dec. 22, 2008, 08:27 PM
Jlee, where did you get your asphalt millings?

I'm considering putting down some rubber mulch, but my hubby is trying to talk me out of it. We put the rubber mulch down around my daughter's swingset, which we put on a low-lying area so that it could have some shade. While there appears to be a moat around it, the area where we put the rubber mulch is great.

We have hard clay, so drainage is always going to be an issue in a few areas. We had some site work professionally done, and while my riding ring turned out great, I still can't seem to get a couple of high-traffic areas to my liking. Hubby wants to do more grading and bring in some dirt, but I say that's a bad idea because the clay won't allow the water to drain and taking away a layer of topsoil and putting dirt on top of clay still adds up to mud in my math. I really think the rubber mulch would work great for my purposes, though it is expensive, so I want to explore all my options. I haven't heard of asphalt millings.

I was thinking pea gravel, but unfortunately clay + smaller stones usually adds up to a cement-like mixture according to the guy who did our site work. He and hubby both said I need larger gravel stones and I'm like, yeah, that will get rid of my mud problem because then my barefoot horses will not be able or willing to walk there anymore.

Catersun
Dec. 22, 2008, 08:27 PM
Jswan... aren't you due to have some random animal show up at your farm to be adopted????

I saw your post on the normal horse thread.

JSwan
Dec. 22, 2008, 08:53 PM
No joke - I've been offered 3 horses this week. Free to good home.

I've stopped answering the phone!

EqTrainer
Dec. 22, 2008, 09:00 PM
Meaty Ogre - what is this with husbands? Mine thinks that, too. He always wants to just push some more dirt on top of whatever washed out. As if that won't just make more mud. He makes me feel craaaaaaazy when he does stuff like that!

But I know how the frontloader works :winkgrin: and you can bet all this pea gravel is going right where I want it to go..

and I understand, too, about the barefoot horses. No problem for my guys but the rehabs don't need to be walking over huge jagged stones. When we were adding onto our house, the cement guys thought they were helping by dumping the extra gravel in front of a new gate :eek:

Luckily you can pay small children to pick up the stones you cannot get w/the front loader!

meaty ogre
Dec. 22, 2008, 09:32 PM
When Mr. MO told me my idea was no good, I dragged him over to my daughter's swingset and showed him how well the rubber mulch was doing. He of course pointed out that the horses don't play on the swingset, and that the rubber mulch will not hold up with traffic.

In the past year, he has:
-dug a hole which managed to rupture both the water and electric lines to my barn (after I asked him to dig the hole 5 feet to the right, which would have been fine)
-skipped the step of adding quickrete to any of the posts except the corner posts for the new quarantine paddock (over my objections) resulting in loose fence posts
-ignored my request to place the quarantine barn on higher land resulting in mud
-hired the lowest bidder for grading who turned out to be some guy with a bobcat, resulting in more mud and poor drainage
-dumped sand in one of said poor-drainage areas resulting in a quagmire that is capable of sucking knee-high rubber boots right off your feet

So, like any good wife, I reminded him of all these things, and told him I was long overdue for a bad idea, he's way ahead of me in that department so it's only fair that I go ahead with my hair-brained rubber mulch idea.

So now I'm keeping my fingers crossed that my Christmas gifts will be money, which I will spend on loads of rubber mulch, much to my family's bewildered puzzlement.

Jleegriffith
Dec. 22, 2008, 10:20 PM
I had my work done by a local paving company. The millings are the size of pea gravel and very small so they don't hurt the horses feet at all. They put them in almost like paving except they didn't roll them out so it's almost like a stonedust footing but a lot cheaper! We did 15,000 square feet for $6000 (some was driveway and the whole entire area in front of my barn).

That being said if I had more $$ I would have done it right which would have been to scrape down to the hard base, add bigger stones and then the pea gravel or even the millings would work. We don't have enough base but with all the rain we have gotten it is not muddy so I won't complain. I just don't think it will last several years.

There is a craigslist posting for asphalt millings $275 for a dump truck full. If you are anywhere close to me feel free to stop by and have a look.

This is our first farm so we are making lots of learn as you go mistakes:D I have worked/managed/leased other farms but having your own place and making decisions with your own money is much different.

Riding ring is next on my list but I am hoping no mistakes will be made there!

Just My Style
Dec. 23, 2008, 10:18 AM
I was given 8 loads of dirt, 4 loads of manure, 10 hours of grading, a lean-to built by my DH, a load of stone dust and 6 bags of seed just before winter. We are giving it a good effort once and for all to get our land under control and good grass come spring. I still would have liked a load of pea gravel for the paddock, but I am still very lucky.

Just My Style
Dec. 23, 2008, 10:22 AM
I was thinking pea gravel, but unfortunately clay + smaller stones usually adds up to a cement-like mixture according to the guy who did our site work. He and hubby both said I need larger gravel stones and I'm like, yeah, that will get rid of my mud problem because then my barefoot horses will not be able or willing to walk there anymore.

BTW- I have used pea gravel in the past. I even have it in my stall that is used like a run-in. The horses are great on it. The stones are small and typically rounder. Mine are barefoot and I haven't had a stone bruise yet. I don't like the bigger stones, crush-n-run or any thing like that. They are hard on the horses.

CanterQueen
Dec. 23, 2008, 12:12 PM
I just called the quarry and they are deliving me 20 tons of pea gravel in a few minutes. This is true Xmas joy for me, as I hate mud... therefore I love pea gravel.

Anyone else gifting themselves gravel this year?

No, I didn't get gravel or a new saddle, or any tack. But I did adopt a local family through a Christian outreach program in our area. This isn't really horse related, but it made me feel as good as a day with my backyard 1000 lb. pets.

This year has been good for us despite the economic downturn, and I felt the desire to "share" and called the group. They gave me a family of seven (mom, dad and five kids). My son and I went shopping, bought gifts and groceries and delivered them yesteday. We met the Mom and one teenage daughter. Both were in tears and gladly accepted our gifts. It wasn't much really, but to them it showed someone out there cared. And I don't think I could have been happier.

God bless all my COTH friends, and a very Merry Christmas to you all!!

meaty ogre
Dec. 23, 2008, 01:13 PM
I've been making some phone calls this morning. I called 2 places about the asphalt millings, but when I told them what I wanted it for, they tried to discourage me, telling me that the asphalt millings are very dirty and you have to be careful about it breaking down and seeping into soil. ? Kind of odd when people aren't eager to take your money. I did do some googling and found some similar warnings. Is there such a thing as a processed or "clean" asphalt millings?

I'm still hoping I can do the rubber mulch. I'm calling around for prices and to see if there is some way I can pick up to avoid delivery surcharge.

Pea gravel would be fine on my horses' feet. The TB gets ouchy sometimes but the rest are pretty tough. The mini could give any mountain goat a run for it's money. Her feet are somewhere between granite and diamond on a scale of hardness. I think they've petrified due to her age. :)
Hubby and sitework guy are adamant that pea gravel plus my clay will become rock hard though. I'm not sure they know what they're talking about based on their previous work, but they both swear they're right on this one. I'm talking to some others with experience in this field at any rate.

If I can conquer my mud I will be the happiest small-farm owner around. I absolutely love everything else about my place.

dressagetraks
Dec. 23, 2008, 02:00 PM
Oh, I'm jealous! Merry Christmas and a very happy new year with your pea gravel.

Roughly how much does it go for these days? I'm getting a new horse for Christmas, but I might treat myself for Valentine's Day or something. :D

JSwan
Dec. 23, 2008, 03:31 PM
I've been making some phone calls this morning. I called 2 places about the asphalt millings, but when I told them what I wanted it for, they tried to discourage me, telling me that the asphalt millings are very dirty and you have to be careful about it breaking down and seeping into soil. ? Kind of odd when people aren't eager to take your money. I did do some googling and found some similar warnings. Is there such a thing as a processed or "clean" asphalt millings?



I knew a lady who got into deep trouble for using it. Turns out she needed special permits from the state or feds. But she lived near water so that may have been why. I'd not use it - it contaminates groundwater.

EqTrainer
Dec. 23, 2008, 07:56 PM
"Hubby and sitework guy are adamant that pea gravel plus my clay will become rock hard though. "


Well.. isn't that what you want instead of mud?!!!!

My pea gravel does work down and get "hard".. to me that means there's just no give underfoot. It's very nice. Not slippery at all but not muddy and the horses feet love it. Then I add a little more on top and that compacts down.. I think it's ideal :)

meaty ogre
Dec. 24, 2008, 08:37 AM
Oh, I'll take anything over mud!

Their argument is that if we scrape some topsoil and put pea gravel down, it will mix with the clay base and form a cement. Sitework guy says that if the grading isn't perfect or if the horses wear tracks/grooves into it and it hardens/sets that way I will have a mess that will be difficult to remove, short of bringing in a jackhammer. He and hubby want to do a full-blown excavation, remove topsoil, bring in loads of clean dirt, then put gravel, then stone dust. I think they just want to play with some big toys. I personally don't trust them to get the grading part done right (since they haven't so far!) and am certain I will end up with water pooling somewhere I don't want it, and/or it will take them 6 months to complete this adventure. They are also wanting to eat up large portions of my pasture putting this combination everywhere, when I only want it in key areas, to preserve as much pasture as possible. My TB *barely* grows hoof at the rate he wears it away. If I let them put stonedust everywhere they want to, he'll be on nubs or I'll have to put shoes back on him.

I went over hubby's head/behind his back or whatever and have a different guy coming out to look and give some suggestions and an estimate. The original sitework guy is a nice guy, but he "eyeballs" it, and doesn't use any equipment other than a bobcat. I think I'd feel better if someone actually made some measurements or even just pretended to!

monstrpony
Dec. 24, 2008, 10:00 AM
Add me to the jealous list. I spent part of Sunday on the tractor moving the last of my gravel stockpile into the spots around my barn that are getting muddy this year. I think when I re-stock, I will get something smaller, now that i have one barefoot and one bare at least for the winter. Over the years, I've put tons and tons of gravel and/or road bond around my barn and I no longer need to wear wellies. After a good snow melts (which really soaks the ground, instead of running off) I do get hoof pockets, but nothing like it was the first couple of years!

Now, if I can only get my semi-rescue clown to stop re-arranging it all. He is inclined to paw a bit (i.e., if I'm "slow" at feed time) and seeks out loose gravel as his fav thing to paw in. No, no, Dipper, it's supposed to be where I put it, not where you want to move it to!!