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JoZ
Dec. 20, 2008, 12:45 AM
We are having ridiculously cold temps here in Washington. OK, OK, nothing like what you folks in the Midwest or Northeast or (god forbid) Canada have to put up with. But I don't live there, I live HERE, and I am being faced with animal issues that I'm not prepared for!

I'm assuming the horses are all going to make it just fine. Some are in stalls, some are turned out; they are getting lots of hay and are drinking just great (normal volume, bless them). Dogs are all inside.

I don't have the option of bringing the barn kitties inside. One reason, shared housing; another reason, cats aren't really catchable. They are inside the barn but the barn is hardly snug (lots of open air which most of the time -- not now -- I really appreciate!). There's hay for them to get up on, and a loft. They have food and water. Are they going to be OK with temps in the teens or single digits? So far they seem OK...

Also, we have some cats in cages. Long story -- basically they are new introductions to the farm and they haven't been neutered yet (they are teenage kittens). We have hay in the cages, and a blanket over the cage. Food, water and company (2 furries in one cage, 3 in the other).

In general, does this sound like adequate care for the kitties?

Simkie
Dec. 20, 2008, 12:51 AM
I think that sounds just fine, especially since the caged kitties have friends!

We have barn kitties here and temps were -15 earlier this week. Kitties are fine :)

If you are concerned, is there a place you could plug in a heating pad? One barn I was at had a teenaged kitty, and she lived on the heating pad in the winter.

danceronice
Dec. 20, 2008, 01:06 AM
Our barn cats in Central Michigan live outdoors all the time. (Well, in the barn, but it's not like it's heated.) If it gets REALLY bad, Dad will put on the kerosene heater for them in the tack room. But generally, they're fine--they have all their kitty beds in the tack room, and the hay in the loft or the old stalls if they like. They all seem to get along fine.

Peggy
Dec. 20, 2008, 01:39 AM
Safer than a plug-in heater might be one of those pads that reflect the heat back when the cat is on it. Like this. (http://www.petcattoys.com/thermalcatcushions.htm) I got one for the working student's kitten one winter after I finished changing my clothes in the tack room and she was curled up on my semi-warm discarded riding clothes. They do get pretty warm. I sat on it to test it out:lol:.

I suspect the cats will be fine tho, especially with their friends for warmth. I saw cats living outside in New England.

sk_pacer
Dec. 20, 2008, 01:51 AM
Mine are fine, when it gets really cold, they either fight for prime real estate under the heat lamp or dig caves in the hay and straw and curl up in cat heaps. The biggest thing is a source of water - heated dish works best, and feed some tinned food as well and the cheaper the better because of the higher fat and moisture content. Also left overs from the house would be appreciated - things like fat trimmings, too tough to eat bits of meat, gristle, poultry skin...all fatty and calorie laden. The fat does really warm them up. Of course lots of cat petting time if you can manage it.

Equine Obsession
Dec. 20, 2008, 03:41 AM
Ah, a similar story: I'm in WA with an airy barn and barn kitties that I'm worried about. For them I created a little cave on the hay with some saddle pads. They seem to enjoy it more than their hay nests, but I'm sure they'd be fine without it. Your setup for the other cats of blanket covered, hay bedded cages with multiple cats inside sounds more than adequate. As long as they all have access to food and water they should be fine.

Supplementing them a little bit with fats and oils might help. My cats are taking that a little further and adding some birds into the mix (first catch I've seen from these two). Time to break out the canned food!

Thomas_1
Dec. 20, 2008, 04:25 AM
With food, water and shelter they'll be absolutely fine. Remember they've got lovely made to measure fur coats.

It tends to be persistent freezing rain and wet and lack of food that does harm to animals.

The only ones I'd be concerned about are the caged ones if they're not able to move about a lot to keep warm. I'd suggest using a vet bed (is that what you call them? purpose made fleecy that always stays dry) and putting some polystyrene or pack hay round the wind prevailing side of the cage.

I definitely wouldn't suggest heat pads and stuff like that unless they were very tiny kittens or unwell.

MistyBlue
Dec. 20, 2008, 06:38 AM
Well, I brought the outside cats in last night...but not because of the cold. Because of the snow and winds. However I have outside feral cats...not barn cats. Go figure...I get feral cats who claimed my back deck as a home and refuse to go in my barn. So while I do have 2 insulated cat houses out on the deck...they weren't happy about trying to hop through loose powdered snow that's deeper than they are tall. Hubby and I felt bad, so they're shut up in my finished basement family room.
But if it were just really cold they;d be fine outside. When I lifted each to bring him in last night, both were toasty warm to the touch even without having a barn to live in. We're just dingbat suckers who felt bad for them, they were fine.
Cats so amazingly well in cold temps. And really hot temps too. They're an extremely adaptable animal. Many times when it's below zero with the wind chill I've watched Spare Kitty happily sitting up on the deck railing enjoying the night instead of in his insulated and fleece lined igloo.
Do make sure they have water, keep their water bowls from being ice skating rinks and keep them well fed during the cold temps.

mothermucker12
Dec. 20, 2008, 07:30 AM
granted i'm not even close to your temps, but our 3 cats stay out all the time, they will bed in the fresh straw and snuggle up together. we do have a cat bed for each and they do use that as well...our barn does not have any area that is completely closed off, so they are in the elements...

Chief2
Dec. 20, 2008, 08:11 AM
Here's another idea from a friend of mine.
She takes an old, rectangular, plastic hard shell food cooler (large, Igloo type), flips it upside down and cuts a doorway hole in one of the short ends. Then she puts pads/blanketing down in the sheltered corner of her deck, puts the cooler-turned-cat-shelter over the stuffing, and then covers it all with blankets and a plastic tarp, so that just the doorway is open for entry. The cat(s) stay warm, toasty and dry in it.

SLW
Dec. 20, 2008, 08:35 AM
That is a clever idea with the cooler turned condo for an outside kitty.

To the OP, your crew sounds like they have been very well provided for during this tough time. I have one older kitty, she is 14, who lives in the barn. She has her box on a table, with a pillow in it which has a nice old plush bathrobe over it. Above the box is a heat lamp which keeps her toasty and her drinking water melted for a couple hours- twice a day it gets dumped and refilled. She gets canned food at night and dry food 24/7.

2DogsFarm
Dec. 20, 2008, 09:42 AM
Ditto on the heated water dish!
The only drawback to mine is the birds use it too so I need to empty & refill nightly or kitty has to drink birdy bathwater w/poop. Mostly she hops into the stalls through the feed opening and drinks from the horses' water buckets (also heated) anyhow.

I got two of those fleece pet beds on sale (2 for $10!) and kitty sleeps in one that I've cocooned with an old sleeping bag on the stacked hay inside the barn. My barn is open as the stall doors to outside never get shut, but it is insulated and noticeably warmer than outside.

If those heatable gel pads go on sale I'll get one, but right now she's doing just fine in single-digit temps w/o.

I also feed her canned food for the extra fat & liquid but just as much as she'll eat at one time or it freezes.

carp
Dec. 20, 2008, 10:10 AM
I pretty much agree with Thomas on this one. The loose cats will be fine as long as they have a place to get into shelter. The ones in cages are more vulnerable because they don't have the option of running around to warm up or finding better shelter if theirs is inadequate. The one thing I'd add is that it makes a difference how well the cat is acclimated. A barn cat is much better prepared for weather extremes than an indoor cat. My shorthaired indoor only pet cat suffers when we turn the heat down to 60 degrees. He'd freeze if I abruptly put him outside; his coat and his metabolism aren't prepared for it. In contrast, his country cousins are perfectly happy in a hay loft when it's 15 degrees outside.

dressagetraks
Dec. 20, 2008, 10:20 AM
My barn cats stay warm and toasty in all sorts of weather, as long as they have hay, food, and water. I've even seen them out in the field hunting when it was negative-brrr and they could have been tucked up in shelter. One of the best cat cubbies I've ever seen was two plastic storage stackable things, the kind that have an opening on the front and are airtight when closed, like you would store cookies or flour or pet food in. They are about 18 inches cubed. I found two unused in a relative's garage, took the doors off, put some hay in, and put those in my garage. Nearly every morning when I go out to feed, at least one cat pops out of each of them at food call.

grayarabpony
Dec. 20, 2008, 10:24 AM
My cats are total wusses. They have heated beds.

Thomas_1
Dec. 20, 2008, 10:51 AM
Well we've 4 cats and all supposed to be farm cats.

One is lying sprawled on top of the radiator next to me with her head on the phone. One is under the christmas tree playing with the tinsel. One is flat out asleep on the settee.

The fourth "Sid Vicious" will be somewhere outside. He's the only one we have that decided he didn't want servants and feed on demand. He was an older un-neutered Tom cat when we first acquired him. My wife went to see him at the vets after he'd just been trapped as part of a huge feral colony clear-out. Our vet (some friend he is!) said come and see them, no obligation. Sid had a sign on his cage that said "euthanase or neuter after Susan has viewed"

Needless to say he got neutered and came to Flodden Edge! He's not sociable - indeed he's a total wild thug! We often don't see him for weeks on end.We put food down for him and he copes perfectly well each winter. He normally gets himself in the hay barn and somewhere between and in the middle of the stacks of round bales

snbess
Dec. 20, 2008, 11:29 AM
I always worry about this, especially as my barn cat makes her annual bid to become a house cat. Unfortunately, she doesn't get along with the house cats - I actually tried it over Thanksgiving and it just doesn't work. So, it's -9 here this morning and Molly is out in the barn. She has a box house with a wool sweater insulated by hay bales on all sides, and also has a "front porch" in front of the box, also surrounded on all sides by hay. This morning when I went to feed, she was in her hay hole on the "front porch". The box is actually warmer, so she's obviously doing just fine out there. I stuck my hand in to pet her when I brought her food to her and she was toasty warm. I still worry, but there's really no reason to. I do have a heated water bowl for her so she gets her water.
Sandra

grayarabpony
Dec. 20, 2008, 11:32 AM
Well we've 4 cats and all supposed to be farm cats.

One is lying sprawled on top of the radiator next to me with her head on the phone. One is under the christmas tree playing with the tinsel. One is flat out asleep on the settee.


I can just see it! :lol:

county
Dec. 20, 2008, 11:40 AM
We have 4 farm cats that live in the barns they do fine even at -30 F they curl up in the straw or hay except old mama cat she sleeps on top of the outdoor wood boiler we use to heat the house.

deltawave
Dec. 20, 2008, 12:23 PM
Our 2 barn cats do fine in all temperatures, right down to below zero. They have shelter in the barn, and have found all the warm little spots to cuddle in. They especially like the hayloft, and the rumps of the horses. Usually I see one cat perched on each horse's butt every time I drive by the barn if it's not snowing. :)

goodhors
Dec. 20, 2008, 12:56 PM
Please be very careful with the heatlamps, warm pads for the animals. An acquaintance had a heat lamp in the garage for the dogs, and it caught his garage, then the house, on fire. Really was a terrible mess, nothing was salvagable.

Being TOO NICE can be dangerous.

Our barn cats do fine in the haystack, food is present all day.
There is usually some rags or a rug to lay on, keeps them insulated. Nights the coons and possums are wandering, so I don't provide food for them. Water is replaced daily, and there is one heated horse bucket if they want. Usually cats would rather drink from the fish pond with the bubbler. I think all the neighborhood cats visit too, eat food and find water in the barn. You can see them sitting in various spots on the hay, warming up their feet. I think most are nuetered, we don't have cat fights like we used to and they live longer now.

Ours have lush, flowing coats. The picture of health. I keep telling them they would make great mittens! Deep snow is bothering them a bit, since it is harder work racing to the door. We got about 6-8 inches, depends on where the wind dropped it. Daughter likes to carry them around, telling me it is TOO HARD for them to walk. She likes them laying around her neck as fur stoles!! Our present ones are black dropoffs, look very pretty with snowy sparkles or frost on their hair. No cats lay on the horses, though they visit on the stall walls, touching noses.

I brought the old barn cat inside when she was 12yrs, after healing from a severe injury and vet expenses. Can't afford to keep an expensive cat outside, they ALWAYS get hit by a car! Very nice cat in all the time we had her, adapted right away to the litter box and sleeping in daughter's bed! Even takes baths well! She likes looking outside, but NEVER asks to go out. Stays FAR AWAY from the outside doors. She is a guaranteed sleep provider, anyone she sits with, goes right to sleep on the couch. Even if you are not tired! We do tie up the Christmas tree now, she tipped it over exploring her first year inside. She doesn't have nearly the hair needed for winters outside now. Much prefers the our one velvet pillow as her throne, instead of the old horse cooler of years past.

Foxyrab
Dec. 20, 2008, 01:13 PM
I make beds for the barn cats out of old insulated coolers as Chief2 suggested, then, for additional warmth, use either a low voltage bed warmer like this: KV Pet & Equine / KV HealthLinks - Dog, Cat and Horse Supplies, Pet Meds and Nutritio (item number 80934 )

Or, a disk called the "Snuggle safe Microwave Heat Pad" that holds heat after being heated in a microwave: Snuggle Safe | Snugglesafe | Heated Pet Beds

Coobie
Dec. 20, 2008, 02:37 PM
First barn cat I acquired a few years ago right now is curled up on the chair in the kitchen, she only goes out(of the house) to go to the bathroom and then runs back in. Barn cat attempt #1-failed.
Second barn cat that acquired me only about a month ago, right now is curled up in the barn on the hay. She has food and water. She has a fleece dog bed with a 1/4 sheet in it. She also has a big plastic box with a flake of hay shaken out and a cotton leg wrap for cushion. That being said when the storm moved in last night predicting over a foot of snow and nasty winds, she slept in my bedroom last night. Barn cat attempt #2-- on the way to failing!

Renn/aissance
Dec. 20, 2008, 03:43 PM
As long as they have company, shelter, food, and water, they should be fine. I wasn't sure from your OP whether or not these cats will cuddle up together, but if they do and they have a fairly insulated area, they should be OK.

Most of our cats--including the rescues and those who were adopted ferals--have the common sense to come in the basement when it's cold, and in fact we have had a hard time kicking one of them OUT of the basement (see: Fattest Barn Cat thread.) For those who don't, though, we have a tiny space heater in the barn, and have made up cat beds out of towels and fleece in tupperwares. There's a water dish by the heater (the outside water dish tends to freeze with very little provocation) and a bowl of food for when the snow piles up higher than the cat's head and they can't get up to their normal food shelter. Both are placed in the "chair space" under a desk with a towel strung up on a curtain rod so that we can draw it closed if there's a draft. They would curl up together in the beds and be just fine. It used to be that we wouldn't turn the heater on until it got below 20 degrees with wind chill, but now that we only have one cat who refuses to come in the basement (her brother, may he rest in peace, died last year) and she has no one to snuggle with, we kick the heater on a little earlier.

Huntertwo
Dec. 20, 2008, 04:52 PM
Well we've 4 cats and all supposed to be farm cats.

One is lying sprawled on top of the radiator next to me with her head on the phone. One is under the christmas tree playing with the tinsel

Please be sure your cats do not ingest any of the tinsel. This could be deadly as the tinsel acts like a *razor* and can very easily shred the intestinal tract.

Huntertwo
Dec. 20, 2008, 04:55 PM
I work with Feral Cats and provide dog houses I bought at Petco. Could that be an option? At least in keeps the body heat contained in a small area.

I use straw as hay tends to get moldy quickly.

The kitties in the cages should be fine - body heat :)

Huntertwo
Dec. 20, 2008, 05:02 PM
Here's another idea from a friend of mine.
She takes an old, rectangular, plastic hard shell food cooler (large, Igloo type), flips it upside down and cuts a doorway hole in one of the short ends. Then she puts pads/blanketing down in the sheltered corner of her deck, puts the cooler-turned-cat-shelter over the stuffing, and then covers it all with blankets and a plastic tarp, so that just the doorway is open for entry. The cat(s) stay warm, toasty and dry in it.

What a great idea!!! What does she use to cut through the hard plastic ???

This would be terrific for my Ferals instead of buying them expensive dog houses.
I'm assuming coolers are a lot cheaper and probably less draftier.

didgery
Dec. 20, 2008, 05:26 PM
I'm in WA too, with temps below 0 degrees F.!

We installed heatlamps for our goats and chickens today, and are feeling slightly better about their wellbeing tonight with those in place. As posted elsewhere, we'll be bringing them into the kitchen if the power goes out while temperatures are still this low!

I would think that company, adequate food and bedding, and a windbreak (the barn itself as well as the blankets for caged kitties) they should be ok. An electric warming pad is a nice suggestion, too, unless you have any concerns about one of your cats chewing it.

didgery
Dec. 20, 2008, 05:29 PM
Please be very careful with the heatlamps, warm pads for the animals. An acquaintance had a heat lamp in the garage for the dogs, and it caught his garage, then the house, on fire. Really was a terrible mess, nothing was salvagable.

Being TOO NICE can be dangerous.

Our barn cats do fine in the haystack, food is present all day.
There is usually some rags or a rug to lay on, keeps them insulated. Nights the coons and possums are wandering, so I don't provide food for them. Water is replaced daily, and there is one heated horse bucket if they want. Usually cats would rather drink from the fish pond with the bubbler. I think all the neighborhood cats visit too, eat food and find water in the barn. You can see them sitting in various spots on the hay, warming up their feet. I think most are nuetered, we don't have cat fights like we used to and they live longer now.

Ours have lush, flowing coats. The picture of health. I keep telling them they would make great mittens! Deep snow is bothering them a bit, since it is harder work racing to the door. We got about 6-8 inches, depends on where the wind dropped it. Daughter likes to carry them around, telling me it is TOO HARD for them to walk. She likes them laying around her neck as fur stoles!! Our present ones are black dropoffs, look very pretty with snowy sparkles or frost on their hair. No cats lay on the horses, though they visit on the stall walls, touching noses.

I brought the old barn cat inside when she was 12yrs, after healing from a severe injury and vet expenses. Can't afford to keep an expensive cat outside, they ALWAYS get hit by a car! Very nice cat in all the time we had her, adapted right away to the litter box and sleeping in daughter's bed! Even takes baths well! She likes looking outside, but NEVER asks to go out. Stays FAR AWAY from the outside doors. She is a guaranteed sleep provider, anyone she sits with, goes right to sleep on the couch. Even if you are not tired! We do tie up the Christmas tree now, she tipped it over exploring her first year inside. She doesn't have nearly the hair needed for winters outside now. Much prefers the our one velvet pillow as her throne, instead of the old horse cooler of years past.

Just read this - any tips on using heatlamps safely if you really feel you must use them??

I expressed some concern about fire when my husband went out for the lamps, but he felt like they'd be fine if securely fastened. The chicken lamp is 18 inches off the ground, pointing down, and the goat lamp is 4 feet up, pointing diagonally down. It is behind a wire fence screen, 12 inches away, to keep the goats from shoving, touching or knocking it. I don't think there's any chance of it falling into the straw, but what else should I look for in terms of risk factors?

DeeThbd
Dec. 21, 2008, 12:38 AM
A couple of other important things include having somewhere draft-free, like a nice blanket-lined hay fort :D. Keep a close eye on their ears, because they CAN freeze......I've seen barncats with hairless ears because of this, or even pretty much frozen off :cry:....so remember the nice snug spot for them.
One winter we were using ice melter instead of salt, and couldn't understand their refusal to touch the porch, only sitting on the rails - the stuff BURNS! Maybe only a sensation rather than an actual burn (not sure) but we went straight back to salt. More snow on the way, and then RAIN! ( Buffalo, NY!)
Stay warm and safe!
Dee

Thomas_1
Dec. 21, 2008, 03:39 AM
Please be sure your cats do not ingest any of the tinsel. This could be deadly as the tinsel acts like a *razor* and can very easily shred the intestinal tract. I'm thinking we've another case of "divided by a common language" here.

I'm not seeing "cat killed by tinsel" as a possibility.

"cat pulls tree down and killed by owner though" :yes:


Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas_1
Well we've 4 cats and all supposed to be farm cats.

One is lying sprawled on top of the radiator next to me with her head on the phone. One is under the christmas tree playing with the tinsel. One is flat out asleep on the settee.

Quote: Grayarabpony
I can just see it!

One of the "poor" farm cats having a hard life!
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v258/flodden_edge/pearlonphone.jpg

MistyBlue
Dec. 21, 2008, 08:08 AM
Thomas...love that photo. BTW, I would *so* use my cell phone to call the hoouse phone and make it ring during that nap. :D Human amusement at expense of cat....for once. :winkgrin:

H2...you can cut holes in the side of a plastic cooler using a Sawzall. They have different blades you snap in...I've found the metal blade to be best at cutting through plastic. Smallest teeth, cuts through like buttah. :yes:
We bought one of those "Dogloo" igloo things for our outside feral cats. It's insulated so holds in any body heat...it has a lawn chair pad in it folded into a triangle shape...it was for a lounge chair so pretty long. Spare Kitty snuggles in that wedged into the triangle. The other cat house on the deck is one of those 44 gallon plastic storage containers. We cut a small hole near the corner of the long side and on the opposite side inside there's a "box" made of styrofoam sheets for insulation and then another lounge chair pad lining that...walls, top and bottom. Boy Kitty prefers that one. That one gets less direct wind due to the entrance location. Spare is long haired and seems to like the wind. That Dogloo was expensive though...not much under $100.
Friday night since the snow was so deep and the two cats were trying to hop through it I ended up bringing them into my downstairs family room. It has 2 couches and 4 chairs down there, heat, etc...put out water and food and a new litter box for them.
Boy is always happy inside for all of 6-8 hours and then he yowls to go outside. Spare had never been inside before...he seemed to do fine. Hid for a while and then napped on a couch. However...one of those cats STINKS to high heaven...Saturday morning I went down there to see how they did overnight and almost dropped dead from the smell of the litter box! :o I went right outside and cleared that deck of snow and then cleared some paths into the woods so they could go do their business without hopping through snow so deep and got those two back outside. Took me the entire day airing it to be able to breath down there without my eyes watering or my gag reflex kicking in.
Next time those two cuties come inside...it'll be in the garage! Pew!

dressagetraks
Dec. 21, 2008, 08:28 AM
I just did morning chores. 4 degrees, windchill 15 below. There was only one cat waiting on the porch for the door to open, which is odd, but other cats immediately started popping out of the garage, from around corners, from cat warp invisible holes, etc., and by the time I got to the feeding station, I had the full usual escort. All felt nice and toasty.

DeeThbd
Dec. 21, 2008, 08:54 AM
Interesting comment about the smell, MistyBlue. This past summer I adopted my TangoCat from our local shelter, and for the first two months, ye gods....I have never smelled ANYTHING like it. I know that he was trying to survive in the grandstand of the racetrack for two months before he was captured (and he was DEFINITELY someone's housecat who got dumped), so heaven knows what he was eating.
Now, though, with his new diet, he smells (normal? :lol:) like he should.
Dee

MistyBlue
Dec. 21, 2008, 11:30 AM
You too, huh? I've never smelled cat feces as bad as what one of those two left in the litterbox. I even did wildlife rehab on some excessively naturally stinky animals (stoats, badgers, etc) and they didn;t stink as bad as whichever cat left. :eek:

JER
Dec. 21, 2008, 01:05 PM
My barn cat has a flannel-lined Coleman sleeping bag. Costs $20. I keep it half-zipped in a camp chair so the cat can crawl in to keep warm. She loves it.

I also have a SnuggleSafe for her but it's like an unhealthy addiction -- she sits on it all day long.

NoDQhere
Dec. 21, 2008, 01:06 PM
Our windchills yesterday and last night were 30 to 50 F below :(. All the kitties are happily inside. Our kitties are indoor outdoor cats who come in at night. But when it is this cold they all turn into house cats 27/7:lol: We do have one WILD feral cat that we haven't been able to catch and I have been really worried about him. But this morning I found him in the shop in a cozy place, nestled into a big box of blankets in the loft. It isn't heated in there but he seemed fine. He really didn't want to leave his place so I left him alone.

Huntertwo
Dec. 21, 2008, 03:31 PM
Thomas...love that photo. BTW, I would *so* use my cell phone to call the hoouse phone and make it ring during that nap. :D Human amusement at expense of cat....for once. :winkgrin:

H2...you can cut holes in the side of a plastic cooler using a Sawzall. They have different blades you snap in...I've found the metal blade to be best at cutting through plastic. Smallest teeth, cuts through like buttah. :yes:
We bought one of those "Dogloo" igloo things for our outside feral cats. It's insulated so holds in any body heat...it has a lawn chair pad in it folded into a triangle shape...it was for a lounge chair so pretty long. Spare Kitty snuggles in that wedged into the triangle. The other cat house on the deck is one of those 44 gallon plastic storage containers. We cut a small hole near the corner of the long side and on the opposite side inside there's a "box" made of styrofoam sheets for insulation and then another lounge chair pad lining that...walls, top and bottom. Boy Kitty prefers that one. That one gets less direct wind due to the entrance location. Spare is long haired and seems to like the wind. That Dogloo was expensive though...not much under $100.
Friday night since the snow was so deep and the two cats were trying to hop through it I ended up bringing them into my downstairs family room. It has 2 couches and 4 chairs down there, heat, etc...put out water and food and a new litter box for them.
Boy is always happy inside for all of 6-8 hours and then he yowls to go outside. Spare had never been inside before...he seemed to do fine. Hid for a while and then napped on a couch. However...one of those cats STINKS to high heaven...Saturday morning I went down there to see how they did overnight and almost dropped dead from the smell of the litter box! :o I went right outside and cleared that deck of snow and then cleared some paths into the woods so they could go do their business without hopping through snow so deep and got those two back outside. Took me the entire day airing it to be able to breath down there without my eyes watering or my gag reflex kicking in.
Next time those two cuties come inside...it'll be in the garage! Pew!

Thanks - A what Saw???? lol... I'll have to check the garage for one of them.. (joking) But, at the price of the dog houses I've bought for the Ferals, I'm sure the Saw would be a lot less expensive. Although, I might be missing a limb or two when I'm done. :lol:

Remember hubby is a city boy. Our tool box consists of a screw driver, pliers and a hammer. Thats it! ;)

grayarabpony
Dec. 21, 2008, 04:27 PM
One of the "poor" farm cats having a hard life!
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v258/flodden_edge/pearlonphone.jpg

Great shot! lol

Nothing knows how to get comfortable like an epicurean cat.

JoZ
Dec. 21, 2008, 04:31 PM
Update: all the cats are doing great! The only unusual development is that the barn kitties at large seem to have developed thumbs (or just amazing persistence) since they have gotten the bungee cords off the Rubbermaid container of cat food two nights in a row. Our barn cats would like to say that there is no better place to curl up and sleep than in a pile of Friskies! Luckily I bought more cat food when I was out yesterday (driving conditions today not so fun).

The kitties in cages are doing wonderfully. I reach my hand in to pet them or grab their food dishes to refill, and it's like a little steam bath in there. I would like to invest in a polarfleece blanket that could cover the entire barn!

Today it's about 32 degrees F and snowing, but things are melting a bit inside the barn. It feels downright balmy. Or perhaps I am now downright balmy (Merriam-Webster definition #2!!).

MistyBlue
Dec. 21, 2008, 04:54 PM
Sawz-All....it saws all things, hence the name. :winkgrin: It's my all-time favorite power tool. It's not as dangerous as other power tools...Mr Blue cab use it without removing body parts. :D
If you want to get a cooler and try cutting the hole in it, stop by my place and I'll cut one up for you and you can see how easy it is.

pb ranch
Dec. 21, 2008, 06:25 PM
For feral cats, we have two Igloo dog houses. Each dog house has a heated pad in it and has an insulated door covering most of the opening. It's a really easy solution to providing them a warm, dry place that is not effected by wind. If it is extremely cold, the cats usually go into one of the dog houses together which makes it even warmer. If it's not as cold, they spread out and use both houses.

camohn
Dec. 22, 2008, 09:12 AM
Ours camp out in the hay bales and do just fine.